Champaign, IL Nursing Home Ratings

Overall Rating of 8 Nursing Homes
    Rating: 5 out of 5 (2) Much above average
    Rating: 4 out of 5 (1) Above average
    Rating: 3 out of 5 (0) Average
    Rating: 2 out of 5 (3) Below average
    Rating: 1 out of 5 (2) Much below average
August 2018

Champaign Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Nursing homes, rehabilitation centers and assisted-living facilities have a legal obligation to ensure that the needs of residents are met by providing specific standards of care. Failing to do so could result in serious injuries, harm or death. In recent years, the Champaign Illinois nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center LLC have seen a significant rise in the number of cases involving abuse, neglect or mistreatment in nursing facilities throughout Illinois.

Medicare regularly collects information on every nursing facility in Champaign, Illinois based on data gathered through inspections, surveys and investigations. Currently, the national database reveals that surveyors found serious violations and deficiencies at five (63%) of the eight Champaign nursing facilities that provide their residents substandard care. If your loved one was mistreated, abused, injured, harmed or died unexpectedly from neglect while residing in a nursing home in Champaign, let our lawyers protect your rights. Contact the Champaign nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center (800-926-7565) today to schedule a free case review to discuss filing and resolving a claim for compensation to ensure you recover your damages.

More than 200,000 individuals reside in Champaign County Illinois, of which more than 20,000 our senior citizens 65 years and older. The significant rise in the number of the aging population has placed a burning demand on nursing facilities in charge of providing professional nursing assistants to the elderly, disabled and rehabilitating. These facilities are charged with providing nursing, health and hygiene care to residents of Champaign, Colfax, Bement, Savoy, Danville, Sullivan, Monticello and Urbana.

A Review of Champaign County Nursing Facilities

Our Illinois nursing home abuse lawyers are witnessing serious problems occurring in nursing facilities that result in civil lawsuits and insurance claims for compensation of residents victimized through neglect, abuse and mistreatment. Our law firm continuously reviews publicly available information gathered from state and federal databases including Medicare.gov. We publish this information in an effort to assist families facing the daunting task of deciding where to place a loved one who requires skilled care in a safe environment.

Our Champaign County elder abuse lawyers listed the facilities below that currently maintain a one star out of five possible stars rating in the national databases. In many of these cases, their below average ratings involve serious opened investigations, filed complaints and surveyor notations made during routine facility assessments and unannounced inspections. Our lawyers have included their primary concerns and detailed specific cases that have caused direct harm to the nursing home resident.

Illinois Nursing Home Negligence Lawsuit Information

Our attorneys have compiled data from reported settlements and jury verdicts from across Illinois to give you an idea of what your case may be worth in a civil law context. We have broken down these cases according to case type and patient injury. Learn more about these Illinois nursing home lawsuit settlements below:

APERION CARE COLFAX
402 South Harrison
Colfax, Il 61728
(309) 723-2591
A “For-Profit” 60-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Do Follow Protocols to Investigate and Report Any Allegation of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 01/20/2016, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “thoroughly investigate allegations of physical abuse.” This deficient practice involved to residents at the facility “reviewed for abuse.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state surveyor conducted a review of a resident’s January 2016 POS (Physician Order Sheet) and 11/08/2015 MDS (Minimum Data Set) that documents the resident has “cognitive impairment and requires physical assistance with all activities of daily living.”

The 6 PM 01/06/2016 Occurrence Report signed by the facility’s LPN (Licensed Practical Nurse) documents that the resident stated to a CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant) that the resident “was going to report [the CNA] for pushing [the resident].” Certified Nursing Assistant [reported the allegation to [the LPN]. The corresponding Nurses’ Note documents [that the LPN] asked [the resident] ‘Is everything alright and she [the resident] stated yes. I [the LPN] asked if there is anything wrong and she [the resident] said no’.” Nurses notes dated 01/02/2015 documented by the facility’s Director of Nurses indicates that the Director interviewed the resident “regarding the alleged abuse the night before [and] documents [the resident] describe the alleged offender as ‘a young guy that helps me, it seems like he was rushing me’.”

The Administrator documented on 01/04/2015 in an interview with the CNA that the CNA stated the resident “was unsteady when [the CNA place their hands on the resident’s] shoulders to stabilize.” The resident then responded to the CNA “do not push me or I will tell and you will get in trouble.” A review of the facility’s 01/05/2016 Social Service Note by the Social Service Director documented that the resident “felt rushed by [the CNA] during care.”

In violation of state and federal regulations, the facility failed to interview other residents and employees about the incident.

At 2:10 PM on 01/20/2016, the state surveyor asked the facility’s Director of Nursing on “investigational guidance on how to conduct abuse interviews of residents who may have received care from an allegedly perpetrator and staff who have worked with an alleged perpetrator.” The Director of Nursing dated “I have no comment; I will review my policy.”

Our Colfax nursing home neglect attorneys recognize and any failure to follow protocols to ensure that all allegations of abuse, neglect or mistreatment are investigated and reported jeopardizes the well-being of all residents at the facility. In addition, the deficient practice might be considered additional abuse, mistreatment or neglect. The facility also failed to follow their own establish policies, procedures and protocols including their 01/01/2016 policy titled: Abuse Prevention Policy that states in part:

“Investigation procedures: the appointed investigator will at minimum attempt to interview the person who reported the incident, anyone likely to have direct knowledge of the incident and the resident if interview-able. Any written statements that have been submitted will be reviewed, along with any pertinent medical records or other documents. Residents whom the accused has regularly provided care and employees with whom the accused has regularly work, will be interviewed to determine whether anyone has witnessed any prior abuse, neglect, mistreatment or misappropriation of property by the accused individual.”

BEMENT HEALTH CARE CENTER
601 North Morgan
Bement, Il 61813
(217) 678-2191
A “For-Profit” 60-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols to Ensure Residents Remain Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/22/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide supervision to prevent one resident requiring physical assistance of staff from rolling off the bed onto the floor.” This deficient practice resulted in the resident “sustaining a fracture of the fourth cervical vertebrae.”

The deficient practice was noted at the review of a resident’s 07/06/2015 Minimal Data Set (MDS) stating that the resident “is severely cognitively impaired, requires total assistance with one staff for bed mobility and assistance of two staff for transfers with the aid of a mechanical lift.”
In addition, the resident’s 09/02/2015 Nurse Progress Review notes that the resident “needs the assistance of two staff for mobility and transfers with the use of a mechanical lift [and] the resident’s care plan states ‘[the resident is] to be free from injury related to falls and [the resident] has padded full side rail to be in the up position while in bed to facilitate safe care [because the resident] makes random and sudden movements that place her at increased risk for falls.”

In addition, the resident’s 09/02/2015 Nurse Progress Review notes that the resident “needs the assistance of two staff for mobility and transfers with the use of a mechanical lift [and] the resident’s care plan states ‘[the resident is] to be free from injury related to falls and [the resident] has padded full side rail to be in the up position while in bed to facilitate safe care [because the resident] makes random and sudden movements that place her at increased risk for falls.”

The facility’s 09/13/2015 1:15 PM Nurses’ Notes indicates that a member of the nursing staff “was called to the room by [a CNA in charge of providing the resident care]. At that time, the resident was “noted to be lying on floor on-site. CNA stated [the resident] was in bed, CNA put rail down, turn to get supplies to change [the resident] and when the CNA return back around [the resident] had turned to her side by grabbing bed and was falling… blood noted from side of scalp… Physician notified with order to send to emergency room for evaluation… Analysts arrived at 1:50 PM for transport to emergency room.”

The facility’s 09/13/2015 1:15 PM Nurses’ Notes indicates that a member of the nursing staff “was called to the room by [a CNA in charge of providing the resident care]. At that time, the resident was “noted to be lying on floor on-site. CNA stated [the resident] was in bed, CNA put rail down, turn to get supplies to change [the resident] and when the CNA return back around [the resident] had turned to her side by grabbing bed and was falling… blood noted from side of scalp… Physician notified with order to send to emergency room for evaluation… Analysts arrived at 1:50 PM for transport to emergency room.”
The resident was transferred to the emergency room, returning later the same day at 5:45 PM “with three staples to laceration on scalp and a fracture the fourth cervical vertebra…”

Our Bement nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow protocols and ensure that every resident remains free of accident hazards places the resident in grave danger and susceptible to serious injury. The deficient practice of not following protocols cause significant harm to the resident and the action might be considered negligence or mistreatment. In addition, the facility failed to follow their own establish procedures and policies, especially the facility’s undated policy titled: Fall Prevention which states in part:

“All staff to provide for resident safety and to minimize injuries related to falls… establish a visual alert system to check those at risk.”

MASON POINT
One Masonic Way
Sullivan, Il 61951
(217) 728-4394
A “For-Profit” 122-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –
Failure to Follow Protocols and Take Necessary Precautions to Minimize the Potential of Accident Hazards That Cause Serious Harm to Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/01/2015, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “safely transfer [a resident] from a wheelchair to the toilet using a mechanical lift.” The failure of the facility “resulted in [the resident] sustaining a fracture of the left femur.”

The deficient practice was noted after a state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s Physician Order Sheet (POS) records for March, April, May and June 2015 documenting that the resident “is to be transferred only with a full body mechanical lift […and] “transfer with two staff and [full body mechanical lift [due to] resident unable to consistently participate with transfers.”

The facility’s 04/13/2015 MDS (Minimum Data Set) documents of the resident is “totally dependent on two staff or service to service transfers and for toileting.” In addition, the facility conducted Fall Risk Assessments on the resident on numerous dates including 09/21/2014, 10/18/2014, 10/20/2014, 01/13/2015 and 04/13/2015. The results of the assessments indicated that the resident is at “high risk for falls.”

The facility’s 06/13/2015 Self-Reported Incident Report documents at a Certified Nursing Assistant transferred the resident “from her wheelchair to toileting using a sit-to-stand mechanical lift with no other staff present and [resident] fell to [the resident’s] knees from the sit-to-stand mechanical lift during the transfer.” The report documents that the resident “experienced pain in the inability to move [their] left knee.” The resident was then “sent to the hospital for an x-ray and was then admitted to the hospital with a fracture of the left femur [… With] the root cause of [the resident’s] fall as [becoming] agitated and letting go of the sit-to-stand mechanical lift.”

However, the facility’s June 2015 Behavior Monitoring Record indicates there is no documentation of “any adverse or educated behaviors on the date of [the resident] fall on 06/12/2015.” Additionally, the Licensed Practical Nurse on duty indicated that the resident “was not frustrated or agitated when I assessed [the resident] when [the resident] fell.”

The state surveyor conducted a 07/01/2015 10:45 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who stated “all CNA’s and licensed nursing staff are trained in the use of mechanical lifts […and] the staff training includes the use of all safety straps including the leg straps […and] the staff should know which residents are to be transferred with which type of lift because each resident has a specific care plan which the staff are directed to follow and stay updated to any changes.”

Our Sullivan Illinois nursing home neglect attorneys recognize it failing to follow protocols when providing care to residents requiring specialized services could place the resident’s health and well-being in jeopardy. The deficient practice of the nursing staff might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it violates federal and state regulations and does not follow the established policies and procedures adopted by Mason Point. The failure resulted in serious injury of a broken femur suffered by the resident at the hands of negligence staff.

PAXTON HEALTHCARE AND REHABILITATION CENTER
1240 North Market Street
Paxton, IL 60957
(217) 379-4896
A “For-Profit” 76-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –
Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/23/2015, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “implement an intervention ordered by the Medical Doctor (MD).” This deficient practice directly involved one resident at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted after an initial review of a resident’s records by the state surveyor and the facility’s Accident and Incident Log that reveals one resident falling three times on 12/07/2015, 12/08/2015 and 12/17/2015. The Accident and Incident Log also documents of the resident “was sent to the emergency room on 12/08/2015 and 12/17/2015 with injuries.” The hospital emergency room doctor ordered that the Paxton Health Care and Rehabilitation Center follow specific procedures including “please keep [the resident] in an area where [the resident] may be monitored by staff during the day to decrease [the resident’s] risk of falls such as areas near the nurse’s station and in common areas. Do not leave unattended during the day.”

The facility’s 12/17/2015 Nurse’s Notes documents the resident is not to be left alone and unattended. However, a 12/22/2015 observation of the resident noted that the resident “was alone in [the resident’s] room alone in the recliner with a pull tab alarm clip on [the resident’s] shirt at 9:53 AM, 10:12 AM, 10:25 AM, 10:30 AM, 10:42 AM, and 10:55 AM. The same date at 2:07 PM, [the resident] was in [the resident’s] room in the recliner along with pull tab alarm clip to [the resident’s] shirt.”

The state surveyor conducted a 12/22/2015 2:08 PM interview with the facility’s Certified Nursing Assistant in charge of providing the resident care who stated “we help [the resident] with transferring because of the falls and we try to check on [the resident] at least every 30 minutes but that does not always happen.”

A few minutes later, the state surveyor conducted an interview with the facility’s Licensed Practical Nurse in charge of providing the resident care who stated “we make sure [the resident] has an alarm on and if [the resident] is non-compliant, by taking the alarm off, they will bring [the resident] out to the nurse’s station.”

Our Paxton nursing home neglect attorneys recognizing that failing to follow procedures and protocols in a hazardous environment can cause serious harm to residents. The deficient practice by Paxton Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it caused serious injury to the resident on multiple falls at the facility. In addition, the failure does not follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility and violate state and federal regulations.

PIATT COUNTY NURSING HOME
1111 N State St
Monticello, IL 61856
(217) 762-2506
A “County Government Owned and Operated” 100-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure That the Residential Environment Remains Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/02/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure that three of four toilet grab bars were firmly secured in the group toilet areas.” This deficient practice could potentially affect 56 residents at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted after the state surveyor conducted a tour the facility on 03/31/2015 at 2:00 PM and observed “the toilet grab bars for the toilet in the 170’s shower room were loose and wobbly. The bars were not secure and safe.” Additional notations are made later in the tour at 2:35 PM where the state surveyor indicated “the toilet grab bars in the toilet room next to the Alzheimer’s unit dining room were loose and not stable.” At 2:55 PM the state surveyor noted that “the toilet grab bars in the toilet room inside the Activity Room were loose.”

The state surveyor conducted a 03/31/2015 interview with the facility’s Maintenance Director who acknowledged “that the toilet grab bars were loose and not firmly secured.” The state surveyor then conducted a review of the facility’s 04/01/2015 Daily Census Report that revealed there were 56 residents residing “in the area served by these toilets with the loose and wobbly toilet grab bars.”

Our Monticello nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to maintain the environment of nursing home residents creates the potential of accident hazards. The deficient practice by Piatt County Nursing Home violate state and federal regulations and their failures might be considered negligence or mistreatment.

CHAMPAIGN URBANA NURSING AND REHABILITATION
302 West Burwash
Savoy, IL 61874
(217) 402-9700
A “For-Profit” 213-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Staff Members Maintain Every Resident’s Rights to Dignity and Respect of Individuality

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 11/10/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “address residents’ needs in a timely manner when the call light was activated.” This deficient practice affected two residents at the facility.”

The deficient practice was noted at the review of an incident occurring on 11/07/2015 at 6:40 AM when a resident of the facility’s “call light began alarming” and one minute later, another resident’s “call light began alarming.” Observations of the incident indicated that three minutes later at 6:44 AM, the Registered Nurse (RN) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) “look down the hall at the call lights and continue to count narcotics on the medication cart.”

By 7:18 AM, or 38 minutes later, the LPN finally answered the first resident’s call light stating that the resident “wanted a notebook.” The second resident setting off their alarm and “call light was answered at 11/07/2015 7:20 AM (39 minutes later) by [the LPN who stated) the resident “needed assistance dressing before breakfast.”

The state surveyor conducted a 11/07/2015 6:44 AM interview with the RN and LPN who concurred that the Certified Nurse’s Aide “is assigned to the first floor.” The RN stated that the CNA “is responsible for taking care of 22 residents.” At 7:30 AM, the registered nurse stated “I do not have any CNA assigned down there; they moved [the CNA] to the second floor. I did not realize that. I do not think anyone is assigned as Charge Nurse on the weekend.”

The resident who first initiated their alarm was interviewed by the state surveyor and revealed “it always takes at least 15 minutes for staff to answer call lights, but it is usually more like 45 minutes. They are worse about it on weekends because they are always short.”

A husband of one of the resident setting off their arm alarm in the early morning also stated during an interview that “it is always this way. They take forever to answer a call light and help someone. [His wife] does not know until [she] really has to urinate [and] needs to go right away. I just help my wife on the toilet so [she] did not wet [herself] and would not cry. [My wife’s] stomach hurts, because they were taking so long to answer the call light. [My wife] needs help dressing. I just cannot do that for [her] anymore. My cancer is back and I am too weak; that is why we are here.” His wife was later interviewed and stated to the surveyor “I wet myself because they took forever getting here.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview with the Director of Nursing on 11/07/2015 at 7:25 AM. The Director stated “I got a CNA moved back down to the first floor we are calling in more staff since there were two call offs.”

Our Savoy nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to ensure adequate staff is on hand to ensure the basic needs of residents are being met might be considered negligence or mistreatment. The deficient practice also violates the facility’s October 2010 policy titled: Answering the Call Light that reads in part:

“The purpose of this procedure is to respond to the resident’s request and needs.”
In addition, a review of the 08/11/2015 and 10/13/2015 Resident Council Minutes documents that “call lights [at this facility] take a long time to answer.”

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY NURSING HOME
500 South Art Bartell Drive
Urbana, IL 61802
(217) 384-3784
A “County Owned and Operated” 243-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure That Residents Maintain Their Dignity and Respect of Individuality

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/08/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “keep the resident’s body covered when lying in bed with the door open.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility.”

The deficient practice was noted in response to an 10/07/2015 11:55 AM observation of a resident who “was in [the resident’s] bedroom lying on the bed, bed was in the high position, with her pants pulled down to her hips and the call light lying on the floor. [The resident’s] skin and Depends were both visible from [the resident’s] doorway.”

The state surveyor conducted a 07/25/2015 review of the resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) that documents the resident’s “cognitive skills for daily decision-making as moderately impaired, decision support, and cues/supervision required. [The resident’s] MDS also documents [the resident’s] functional limitations in range of motion in the upper and lower extremities, as being impaired.” The MDS also states of the functional status of the resident “as being totally dependent on staff for self performance of activities of daily living.”

The resident’s 08/11/2015 care plan documents that “staff to provide all hygiene and dressing needs and all needs for [the resident].”

The state surveyor conducted an interview with two of the facility’s LPNs (Licensed Practical Nurses) on 10/07/2015 at noon who “viewed [the resident’s] room and stated the call light should not be on the floor, the bed should be in the lowest position, and [the resident’s] pants should be pulled up.”

Our Urbana nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that every resident in nursing facilities have the right to maintain their dignity and respect of their individuality at all times. Any failure of the nursing staff to do so might be considered neglect or mistreatment because it violates the resident’s rights and does not follow the established protocols and procedures adopted by Champaign County nursing home.

DANVILLE CARE CENTER
1701 North Bowman
Danville, IL 61832
(217) 443-2955
A “For-Profit” 200-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols When Providing Services and Treatment to Heal Existing Pressure Sores or Prevent the Development of a Pressure Sore

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 02/25/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure that staff wash their hands, use aseptic technique, and prevent cross-contamination during a pressure ulcer dressing change.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility “reviewed for pressure ulcers.”
The deficient practice was noted after review of the resident’s medical records, MDS (Minimum Data Set) and Physician Order Sheet (POS) noting the resident is severely cognitively impaired with documented pressure ulcers at level Stage II and Stage IV. The resident’s February 2015 Physician Order Sheet (POS) in the case of the resident was diagnosed with pressure ulcers, severe intellectual disability, Vancomycin-resistant enterococci infection (VRE), pressure ulcers and metastatic prostate cancer. The resident’s Plan of Care documents the resident has compromised immunity secondary to cancer and “is at risk to develop secondary infection due to antibiotic use.”

The state surveyor performed the routine tour of the facility on 02/24/2015 at 2:10 PM where the Wound Nurse was observed walking “to the treatment cart outside the […and] resident’s room […and] proceeded to set up the treatment administration fluids and ointments without washing [their] hands or applying gloves.” Later throughout the wound treatment the Wound Nurse was observed using gloves while using a contaminated pan to record measurements followed by the application of calazime cream.

Our Danville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow protocols and procedures while providing treatment to heal existing pressure sores to a resident suffering with infection might be considered negligence or mistreatment. The deficient practice violates policies adopted by Danville Care Center especially the 12/08/2002 policy titled: Dressing Change: that reads in part:

“Purpose of dressing changes to protect wounds, prevent irritation, prevent infection and the spread of infection…”

Our Illinois elder abuse lawyers also recognize that the nursing staff failed to follow the facility’s 03/15/1998 policy titled: Hand Washing that directs the staff to follow specific protocols such as:

“Hands should be thoroughly washed before and after resident care… Wash your hands before and after all procedures.”

GARDENVIEW MANOR
14792 Catlin Tilton Road
Danville, IL 61834
(217) 443-6430
A “For-Profit” 213-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Physical Restraints

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 05/15/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning three failures including the facility’s failure to “identify medical symptoms and/or diagnoses justifying the use of physical restraints [and a failure to] complete pre-restraint assessments [and a failure to] obtain a physician order and family consent for physical restraints.” These deficient practices affected three residents at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted by the state surveyor after a review of a resident’s records including their May 2015 Physician Order Sheet (POS) documenting the resident with dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, potential for rehabilitation, leukemia and anxiety. The POS orders a self releasing seatbelt where staff members in charge of providing the resident care must “release the seat belt every two hours for toileting, during meals and activities.”

The resident’s 12/05/2014 MDS (Minimum Data Set) documents that the resident “is severely cognitively impaired and uses a wheelchair for mobility” and uses the “wheelchair for locomotion propelled by self and with assistance for distance.”

The facility’s Fall Log documents of the resident has experienced falls between 07/01/2014 and 01/14/2015. A review of the facility’s 01/14/2015 Fall Occurrence Investigation Report documents that the resident “stood up from the wheelchair to ambulate and fell. The post-fall intervention documented for this fall on the Plan of Care is self-releasing seatbelt.”

An incident arose on 05/13/2015 at 12:35 PM where the resident was observed “at the dining table eating with [a member of the nursing staff] assisting and [resident’s] soft waist restraint was undone. [The nursing staff member] apply the restraint back on for [the resident] and he asked [resident] again if she could take the restraint apart. [The resident] attempted to undo the restraint was not able to release the restraint.”

A review of the facility’s 01/17/2015 form titled: Restraints/Adaptive Equipment Use Observation documents that the resident “has had one on one and walking with staff assist as a restraint alternative. The medical symptom documented on this same form for the use of physical restraint (non-releasable seat belt) is listed as ‘unsteady gait’.” The state surveyor found “no other documentation for Medical Symptoms is available for review. Functional factors considered for the use of a non-releasable seatbelt is documented on this form as falls.”

Our Danville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow procedures, protocols and policies when providing care and instead utilizing physical restraints without documented medical symptoms and authority might be considered abuse, mistreatment or neglect. The deficient practice violated the facility’s December 2008 policy titled: Use of Restraints that reads in part:

“Restraints may only be used if/when the resident has a specific medical symptom that cannot be addressed by another less restrictive intervention AND a restraint is required to treat the medical symptom, protect the resident safety; and help the resident attain the highest level of his/her physical or psychological well-being.”

Fighting for the Rights of Nursing Home Residents in Champaign, IL

The Champaign County nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center LLC fight for the rights of nursing home residents suffering harm, injury or death through the negligent action of others. We understand the comprehensive Illinois laws, procedures and protocols design to protect the aging population. We have access to ample resources to ensure the injured party can obtain justice and hold those legally responsible financially accountable.

Our Illinois nursing home lawyers have handled many types of nursing home neglect cases that involve:

  • Bedsores (pressure sores; pressure ulcers; skin ulcers; decubitus ulcers),
  • Amputations,
  • Dehydration and malnutrition,
  • Failing to provide basic standards of care,
  • Failing to monitor blood work,
  • Failing to provide security in a safe environment,
  • Failing to prevent fall accidents,
  • Failing to seek appropriate consultation with qualified medical staff,
  • Medication overdoses,
  • Drug errors,
  • Wandering and elopement
  • and other serious issues resulting in harm and death.
Hiring an Attorney to Prosecute a Champaign Nursing Home Abuse Lawsuit

Learning your loved one has been harmed, injured or abused by the nursing staff you entrusted to provide care is shocking, devastating and unimaginable. When that happens, you want to seek justice and hold those in responsible, legally accountable. Our Champaign Illinois nursing home neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center LLC have a comprehensive understanding and years of experience in representing nursing home victims. Our team of reputable elder abuse lawyers investigate, gather evidence, speak to eyewitnesses and devise strategies to achieve the results you need to obtain the financial compensation you deserve.

We encourage you to contact our Illinois elder abuse law offices by calling (800) 926-7565 today to schedule your free, full case evaluation. All information you share remains confidential. We accept wrongful death lawsuits, personal injury claims and nursing home abuse cases through contingency fee agreements. This means we provide all necessary legal representation without the need of you paying any upfront fee.

For additional information on Illinois laws and information nursing homes look here.

Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect Resources

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

Client Reviews
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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
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After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric