Wagner Heights Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

Nursing homes have a legal obligation to provide care for your loved one according to a plan that they must carefully monitor, follow and revise as necessary. When they fail to do so in a manner that harms your loved one, they may be found legally responsible for any damages in court. Call the Nursing Home Law Center to learn more about the process of filing a lawsuit against the nursing home and to find out how we can help your family.

Wagner Heights Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

This nursing home is a large-sized 152 bed for-profit facility that offers short and long-stay care to residents of the Stockton area. The Medicare/Medicaid approved facility is located at:

9289 Branstetter Pl
Stockton, CA 95209
(209) 477-5252
Wagner Heights Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

Nursing home residents and their families have the ability to file complaints against skilled nursing facilities for deficiencies in care and the environment. Both federal and state law necessitate that these complaints must be investigated. If necessary, inspectors will be sent to the facility to conduct a full onsite investigation. Federal and state law allow for monetary fines against a nursing home if the violation is egregious enough. In most cases where there is actual harm to a resident, the facility will receive a fine and a possible payment denial from the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Wagner Heights Nursing & Rehabilitation Center has been the subject of frequent complaints filed by its residents and their families. This has resulted in a number of complaint citations against the facility. The number of complaints filed with the State of California far exceeds the statewide average. Even though this is a larger facility, the amount of complaints is still disproportionate.

While the facility has not been fined by the federal government in the past three years, there have still been three fines from California. Recently, the nursing home received a $20,000 fine from California for a lapse in patient care. The resident fell out of bed during bowel and bladder care and sustained a fractured leg. The care plan specified that two staff members were supposed to provide this care for the resident. However, one staff member performed this task since they did not know that two were required. The resident had an artificial knee join and the fracture was so severe that the orthopedic surgeon recommended amputation of the leg below the knee.

In 2017, the facility received a small fine for failure to promptly an incident of abuse. One resident, who had a propensity for aggressiveness and violence, grabbed another resident’s wheelchair and shook it. The problem here was that this was a form of physical abuse and the facility was obligated to report it within 24 hours. Instead, all that was done was that there was a note placed in the resident’s clinical record. This was the second time the facility was fined in two years for the same type of event because the previous year, it failed to report the fact that one resident threw a beverage in the face of another resident.

There has been an increase in resident complaints recently. In March 2019, the facility received a citation as a result of a complaint investigation. Staff failed to follow a physician’s order, which had the possibility to increase the resident’s blood sugar level. The nurse had been using their judgment to not administer insulin to a resident based on their blood sugar level notwithstanding a physician’s order for insulin. There was another citation issued when staff failed to properly fix and deal with a leaking roof that caused a resident to trip and fall. Residents reported that the roof persistently leaked and the nursing home’s response was to put buckets on the floor.

Previously, a nurse had given a resident a medication to which they were allergic. The resident had a reaction and needed to be transported to an acute care facility. The failure in part resulted from an error at the pharmacy and a mix-up in communication. This was one of a dozen instances where the nursing home received a citation as a result of a complaint investigation in the past three years.

The most recent inspection report, issued in 2018, resulted in 18 health citations against the facility. This is above the average of eight nationally. While California nursing homes are generally graded more strictly than those in other states, it is still well above the state average of 12 health citations.

Many of the incidents described above either caused injury to a senior or had significant potential to do so. Had it been your loved one who experienced this, you would likely want the nursing home to face consequences for what they did beyond just receiving a fine from the government. This would mean a lawsuit where the nursing home would have to pay compensation. The attorneys at the Nursing Home Law Center can help you through that process. Call us today at (800) 926-7565 to learn how you can file a lawsuit against a nursing home where your loved one suffered harm due to the errors or omissions of that nursing home.

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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
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After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric