Towson, MD Nursing Home Ratings

Towson Maryland Nursing Home Abuse AttorneysAbuse and negligence in nursing facilities occur when the staff or other residents cause the resident significant injuries. Unfortunately, quick action by the nursing home administration might not always be forthcoming because many nursing facilities are all about profits run by multibillion-dollar corporations that are eager to please their stockholders. Because many facilities provide substandard care, both state and federal governments have introduced strong regulations in an effort to protect residents from the nursing staff in charge of providing the resident care. Unfortunately, the Towson nursing home neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center LLC continue to see significant problems in nursing facilities involving mistreatment.

Nearly 625,000 individuals reside within the city limits of Towson, with almost twice that number living in Baltimore County. Of that, almost 17 percent or one in six of all residents are senior citizens, many of whom live in nursing facilities. In recent years, the significant increasing elderly population in the Baltimore area has placed a huge demand on the number of nursing home beds and the staff necessary to provide health and hygiene care. Because of that, there has been a significant increase in the number of cases involving mistreatment.

Towson Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

Many families with a loved one in a nursing facility are unexpectedly disappointed to find that the nursing home does not provide adequate care and treatment to their elderly, disabled or rehabilitating parent or grandparent. Because of that, our Maryland elder abuse attorneys have long served as legal advocates to nursing home residents statewide.

In addition, our lawyers review and post the most current information on health concerns, filed complaints and opened investigations in nursing homes throughout Baltimore County. We publish this information source from national publicly available databases including Medicare.gov in an effort to provide families the best means to make an informed decision of which nursing facilities provide quality care.

Comparing Towson Area Nursing Homes

Our Maryland elder abuse attorneys post the information below detailing a long list of nursing facilities throughout the Towson area that currently maintain substandard ratings compared to other facilities throughout the U.S. In addition, we have added the primary concerns at these facilities with conditions, events or lack of care that could or has resulted in injury or harm of residents.

Information on Maryland Nursing Home Abuse & Negligence Lawsuits

Our attorneys have compiled data from settlements and jury verdicts across Maryland to give you an idea as to how cases are valued. Learn more about the cases below:

MANORCARE HEALTH SERVICES – RUXTON
7001 Charles Stree
Towson, Maryland 21204
(410) 821-9600

A “For-Profit” 169-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Maintain the Nursing Home Area to Ensure Residents Are Free from Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 05/07/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide adequate supervision and assistance during bed mobility for resident.”

The deficient practice by the nursing staff at ManorCare Health Services – Ruxton “resulted in the resident falling from bed, landing face down on the floor between [their] bedside table and bed, sustaining physical and emotional trauma.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state surveyor reviewed the resident’s medical records regarding the falling incident. The medical records indicated that the resident had “slip and fall and resulting in a fractured left ankle which became displaced requiring surgical repair the hospital, prior to their admittance to the facility. Only then was the “resident discharge to [ManorCare Health Services – Ruxton] for rehabilitation [on 05/10/2013].”

The state surveyor reviewed the resident’s quarterly MDS (Minimum Data Set) that reveal the resident “required extensive assistance of two persons for bed mobility [including assistance for turning from side to side and position their body while in bed]. The correlating Care Plan and Geriatric Nurse Assistant That (GNA) care sheets, also, noted that two persons were to assist with bed mobility, turning, positioning and incontinent care.” The surveyor noted that at the time of the fall, these were the assessments in the Plan of Care and tasks that were to be carried out by the nursing staff.

The state surveyor concluded by review of the facility’s 11:24 PM 04/14/2015 Progress Notes that “the resident fell from the bed landing face down while being turned by [the GNA providing the resident assistance] as she provided care by herself. [The resident] was assessed to have a very large hematoma (collection of blood outside of the vessels, larger than 10 centimeters) in the center of [her] forehead. [She] complained of left ankle pain at the rate of 7/10 (on a scale of 1-10) and the physician ordered the resident be transferred to the emergency room (ER).”

While at the hospital, the resident was assessed for her head trauma where the injury “was described as concussion [a blow to the head causing traumatic injury] and contusion [a blow to the head causing an injury that does not break the skin but does colors the skin typically leaving a bum/lump with pain and swelling… and] a pelvis x-ray results were negative for fracture.”

The facility Administrator documented on 04/15/2015 in a summary of interviews with the resident, the resident’s son and the resident’s roommate. The result of the interviews revealed that “the resident felt as though the GNA that was with [her] at the time of the fall… had pushed [her] out of bed and was being nasty.”

Documentation by the Director of Nursing and Human Resources Director of an interview with the GNA providing care at the time of the incident revealed that the Geriatric Nursing Assistant “was the only person with the resident at the time of the fall. Her statement noted that she asked for help from other staff members before providing care to [the resident] but that nobody was available so she provided care alone – the resident fell from the bed landing face down on the floor.”

The Human Resources Director gave the Geriatric Nursing Assistant an Employee Warning Notice on 04/21/2015 “which [the GNA] refuse to sign. The documentation which made the final warning/termination necessary include the following: on the evening of 04/14/2015 while providing ADL (activities of daily living) care, [the GNA] did not follow the Plan of Care. As a result, the resident fell from the bed which cause significant physical and mental injury […and that the GNA] was not honest in her statements when she described asking for help of other GNAs – which was unconfirmed during the investigation and statements of other staff.”

The following day, the facility had an initial psychiatric evaluation done on the resident “because the resident felt [she] was pushed out of bed and felt [the GNA] should have had someone else with her. The resident] was described to have significant facial bruising and follow-up emotional support was recommended.”

The state investigator noted that “the facility failed to provide adequate supervision and assistance during bed mobility for the resident. This resulted in the resident falling from bed, landing face down on the floor between [their] bedside table and bed, sustaining physical and emotional trauma.”

Our Towson nursing home neglect lawyers recognize that failing to follow protocols to ensure the residents remain free from accident hazards and provide adequate supervision to prevent avoidable accidents has the potential causing serious harm and injury to residents. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at ManorCare Health Services – Ruxton might be considered negligence, mistreatment or abuse because the failures did not follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility and violated federal and state nursing home regulations.
MANORCARE HEALTH SERVICES – DULANEY
111 West Road
Towson, Maryland 21204
(410) 828-6500

A “For-Profit” 135-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Are Free from Unnecessary Medications

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 05/15/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “identify target symptoms and justify continued use of psychoactive medication for a resident [at the facility].”

The state surveyor noted during our review of a resident’s records that a physician ordered medication on 10/13/2011 for a resident given “two times a day for mood” and at the “hour of sleep for mood.” The notation indicated that the treatment was for the resident’s medical condition noting that “a manic episode is a distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive or irritable mood. Typical symptoms [for the medical condition can involve] pressure of speech, reduced need for sleep, flight of ideas, grandiosity, poor judgment, aggressiveness and possible hostility.”

The surveyor conducted a 05/14/2015 9:20 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing to request “how the facility identifies and monitors targeted behaviors to evaluate the effectiveness and continued need of [the resident’s psychoactive medications].” At 10:18 AM, the [Director of Nursing] confirmed the facility did not identify or monitor targeted depression behaviors for [the resident]” before administering the psychoactive medication.

The state surveyor conducted an interview the following morning at 11:00 AM with the facility’s Director of Nursing to reveal that the facility “staff failed to identify and document target behaviors for continued use of psychoactive medications […and] failed to identify and monitor targeted behaviors to assess the continued need and effectiveness of antidepressant medication [for the resident].”

Our Towson nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow protocols to ensure that all residents are free from unnecessary medications has the potential of causing the resident serious harm or injury to their health and well-being. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at ManorCare Health Services – Dulaney might be considered mistreatment or negligence because the failures did not follow established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility.

HOLLY HILL NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER
531 Stevenson Lane
Towson, Maryland 21286
(410) 823-5310

A “For-Profit” 75-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents Necessary Care and Treatment of Developing Pressure Ulcers

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/21/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “document administration of a treatment to [a resident’s] pressure ulcer.” In addition, the state investigator noted the facility’s failure “to document a thorough assessment of [the resident’s] pressure ulcer” and a failure to “develop a Care Plan with appropriate goals and interventions related to [the resident’s] risk of developing pressure ulcer.”

The deficient practice was noted at the state surveyor reviewed a resident’s medical records on 09/17/2015 noting that the resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) noted the resident “required extensive assistance with bed mobility and was incontinent of bowel and bladder. Additionally, the resident was assessed as being at risk for the development of pressure ulcers.” The surveyor noted that even with these conditions, “the facility staff failed to develop a Care Plan with appropriate goals and interventions related to the resident’s risk for the development of pressure ulcers.”

The state surveyor noted that the resident’s 05/29/2015 medical records show the resident “was assessed by nursing with an open area to the sacrum. However, nursing failed to document a more comprehensive assessment of the resident’s wounds [including] length, width, depth, pain, drainage, odor, tissue type/stage of the wound.” The surveyor noted that the “physician assessed the [resident’s wounds] on 05/29/2015 and gave an order to cleanse the wound with normal saline solution or wound cleanser, dry the area and applied Duoderm every three days.”

However, the surveyor reviewed the resident’s TAR (Treatment Administration Record) which revealed “the facility staff failed to document the treatment was done to the resident’s sacral wound on 03/29/2015.”

Our Towson nursing home neglect lawyers understand the failing to follow protocols when providing treatment and care to residents with developed bedsore could cause additional harm and injury to the resident. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Holly Hill Nursing and Rehabilitation Center might be considered mistreatment or negligence because the facility failed to follow established protocols and procedures as required by state and federal nursing home regulators.

LOCH RAVEN CENTER
8720 Emge Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21234
(410) 668-1961

A “For-Profit” 101-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Appropriate Services and Treatment to Ensure the Resident Restores as Much Normal Bladder Function as Possible

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/25/2015, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “provide appropriate treatment and services to restore as much normal bladder function as possible [for two residents at the facility].”

The deficient practice was noted review the medical records of a resident at the facility including the resident’s Quarterly Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) dated 05/15/2015 that indicates that the resident is “always continent.” However, “the same day the facility staff conducted urinary incontinence evaluation and indicated “yes” that the resident now experiences urinary Incontinence.

The investigator conducting the survey noted that “urinary incontinence is not normal. Although aging affects the urinary track increases potential for urinary incontinence, urinary incontinence is not a normal part of aging […and] because urinary incontinence is a symptom of the condition and may be reversible, it is important to understand the cause and to address incontinence to the extent possible. If the underlying condition is not reversible, it is important to treat or manage the incontinence to try to reduce complications such as pressure ulcers and infection.”

At the conclusion of a thorough investigation, the state investigator revealed that the “facility staff failed to conduct an in-depth assessment to determine the cause and type of the new onset of incontinence and provide treatment and services to manage and restore as much bladder function as possible.”

The surveyor conducted a 05/25/2015 interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing and Administrator confirming that “the facility failed to conduct an in-depth assessment, development care plan and provide treatment and services to restore as much bladder function as possible.”

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the feeling to provide appropriate services and treatment to ensure that residents restore their normal bladder function whenever possible has the potential of causing serious harm or injury to the resident, especially the development of avoidable bedsores. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Loch Raven Center might be considered mistreatment or negligence because the staff failed to follow protocols and procedures adopted by the facility.

CROMWELL CENTER
8710 Emge Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21234
(410) 661-5955

A “For-Profit” 135-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Remain Free of Physical Restraints Unless Needed for Medical Treatment

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/07/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s use of “had meds on a resident without current ongoing documentation for recent continued use of restraints.” The state investigator identified the problem as the facility’s “use of unjustified restraint” on a resident at the facility “assessed to be cognitively impaired and not capable of making medical decisions.”

The deficient practice was noted after the surveyor reviewed a resident’s medical records on 04/03/2015 revealing “a physician’s order written as hand mitts when in bed.” In addition, the resident’s TAR (Treatment Administration Record) revealed “documentation by all three shifts on April 1, and April 2 [with] night shift documenting use of mitts on April 3.” The surveyor reviewed the March 2015 TAR (Treatment Administration Record) revealing there was “ongoing use of hand mitts on all three shifts [… and that the original order for use of hand mitts is dated 07/08/2014.]”

However, upon review of the resident’s medical records there were no documentation to “reveal any justification for ongoing use of restraints. There were not any written plans of care for the use of hand mitts when in bed.”

The surveyor conducted an 04/03/2015 11:45 AM interview with the facility’s Unit Manager who “reveal that [the resident] had a Foley catheter inserted at one time and the resident was pulling it out. (A urinary Foley catheter is a flexible tube that is often passed through the urethra of the penis and into the bladder for urine drainage).

The surveyor conducted a review of the “physician’s order sheet [that] revealed that the use of the Foley Catheter was discontinued on 12/10/2014 [4 months prior].” As a result, the state surveyor indicated that “restraint use should be limited to circumstances in which the resident has medical symptoms that warrant the use of restraints.”

Our Baltimore nursing home abuse lawyers recognize that the use of unnecessary physical restraints violates federal and state nursing home regulations. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Cromwell Center might be considered abuse or mistreatment and that it restricted the freedom of movement or normal access to one’s body without medical cause.

LONG GREEN CENTER
115 East Melrose Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21212
(410) 435-9073

A “For-Profit” 135-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols to Report and Investigate Any Allegation or Act of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/30/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “report allegations of abuse to the Administrator immediately and [a failure to] protect other residents for potential abuse after the initial allegations of abuse were observed.”

The state investigator reviewed it resident’s records including their Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) given by medical professionals to assist them in determining the resident’s cognitive abilities. The resident presented a score of 7 (where 0-7 indicates severe impairment).

The complaint investigation was initiated because of an incident noted in a nurse’s statement on 08/17/2015 indicating that “at around 7:30 PM, the Charge Nurse from the Charles Unit called and told her that the resident from the Joppa unit was on her unit.”

The investigative documentation reviewed by the state investigator “reveal that on 08/17/2015 between 8:00 PM and 8:30 PM, [a Geriatric Nurse Assistant] revealed that she went over to the Charles unit to bring [the resident] back to [their] unit but the resident did not want to come back to Joppa unit.” Because of the resident’s resistance, the Geriatric Nurse Assistant “asked the resident for permission to do evening care and the resident agreed only if it can be done on the Charles unit. Further review revealed that after the GNA completed evening care she covered the resident up making the resident comfortable and told [a staff member] that the resident was resting and wanted to stay in the dining area. “However, one staff member told another staff member] of the resident had to go back to the Joppa unit.” The staff member revealed on 08/17/2015 that the facility’s Director of Nursing “was called because [a staff member] was trying to make the resident return to the unit against the resident’s will.”

A Geriatric Nursing Assistant provided a statement revealing “that while doing PM care she heard someone cry out in the hallway on Charles unit, and as she walked towards the crying it was [the resident] crying with [the staff member] standing over top of the resident trying to pull a resident in the wheelchair by grabbing the resident by the shirt and under the arms.” The CNA revealed “that the resident started screaming and kicking, and was heard stating that [they] did not want to go.”

The Geriatric Nursing Assistant told the staff member “the resident would leave when [they] were ready and the resident sat on the floor. [The staff member] grabbed the resident by the shirt and slid the resident across the floor back into the dining room.” That was when another staff member who saw what happened indicated they called the Director of Nursing. However, the Director of Nursing “reveal that he was not called when this incident occurred.”

The Human Resource Specialist at the facility provided a statement revealing that they had spoken with the resident and the resident “informed her that someone had choked and pulled [their] shirt.”

The state investigator conducting a review of the incident revealed “the facility staff failed to notify the facility’s evening shift supervisor, nor did they notify the [Director of Nursing). The alleged perpetrator was allowed to continue working with the resident for the remainder of the shift.”

The Director of Nursing was interviewed by the state investigator on 10/30/2015 at 2:30 PM acknowledging “he did speak with [the staff member] in reference to moving the resident against the resident’s wishes […and] acknowledged that he did not follow up with staff in reference to the resident […and] reported that he was not made aware of the allegation of abuse until the Social Worker came to him around 3:30 PM.” The Director of Nursing revealed that the staff member “was reported to the Board of Nursing and indicated that the police was called, but [the Director of Nursing] failed to supply any documentation that law enforcement was called and made aware that the abuse was sustained.”

The state investigator noted that “despite multiple staff witnessing the physical abuse that occurred to [the resident], none of them reported to the facility administration immediately in order for a timely investigation to be conducted to prevent further abuse to [the resident] and other residents at the facility.” The surveyor reviewed the nurse’s employee file that revealed that “she had been terminated on 08/24/2015.”

Our Baltimore elder abuse lawyers recognize that the deficient practices by the nursing staff and administration at Long Green Center violated federal and state nursing home regulations. In addition, these failures did not follow the facility’s revised 07/01/2009 policy titled: Abuse Policy/Procedure that reads in part:

“Anyone who witnesses an incident of suspected abuse is to tell the abuser to stop immediately and report the incident to his/her supervisor immediately.”

PERRING PARKWAY CENTER
1801 Wentworth Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21234
(410) 661-5717

A “For-Profit” 125-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure the Residents Receive Services and Treatment to Not Only Continue, but Improve the Ability to Care for Themselves

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/15/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide restorative nursing services as ordered by the physician for [2 residents at the facility].”

The deficient practice was noted by the state investigator after reviewing a resident’s 06/17/2015 medical records revealing “the physician in collaboration with physical therapy ordered: resident to be followed by restorative nursing program: to walk with rolling walker 100 feet (or as tolerated) three times a week to maintain functional ambulation and transfers.”

A review of the medical records reveal that the “facility staff failed to provide restorative nursing program three times a week as ordered.” The surveyor noted that the facility staff documentation revealed that the restorative nursing was provided to the resident was provided 10 times between 08/24/2015 and 10/09/2015.

The surveyor noted that “Restorative Nursing is an individualized program where restorative aides are transferred by the therapy staff to provide exercises to maintain and prevent a decline in the resident’s current level of functioning.”

The surveyor conducted a 10/15/2015 11:00 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing to confirm that “the facility staff failed to provide restorative nursing services to maintain a resident’s current level of functioning and prevent a decline as ordered by the physician”

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect lawyers recognize that failing to follow protocols to ensure that residents receive treatment and services to improve their ability to provide their own care has the potential of diminishing the resident’s quality of life. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Perring Parkway Center might be considered mistreatment or negligence because it did not follow doctor’s orders to ensure the health and well-being of the resident.

LEVINDALE HEBREW GERIATRIC CENTER AND HOSPITAL
2434 W. Belvedere Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21215
(410) 466-8700

A “For-Profit” 210-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Implement Policies and Procedures for Screening and Training Sitters and Companions Who Attend Facility Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/08/2015, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “implement policies and procedures for screening and training sitters and companions who attend to facility residents.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator who reviewed the 12/23/2014 Facility Reported Incident Form revealing that “at approximately 8:00 AM, the day shift personal aide noted that the resident had a large bruised and swollen area on the left forearm. The investigation revealed the private aide assigned to the resident’s care “during the 11 PM to 7 AM shift, stated the resident did not fall but was agitated throughout the night and the bruise may have occurred related to the episode of agitation.” The facility had the resident x-rayed where the 12/23/2014 11:23 AM x-ray report “reveal defining a soft tissue swelling of the left forearm. The injury of unknown origin was not reported to the nurse by [the personal aide working the 11 to 7 shift].”

An interview was conducted with the aid on 04/07/2015 at 3:10 PM where they stated “they noticed the resident’s bruised and swollen left arm on 12/23/2014 at approximate 11:00 AM, while receiving report from [the personal aide].” They stated that when they made an inquiry of the personal aide “about the origin of the injury [VA] was unable to provide an explanation.” Because of that response, the second aide “promptly reported the injury of unknown origin to the [Licensed Practical Nurse on duty].”

The state investigator conducted an 04/03/2014 8:50 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who reported that “the facility does not maintain files containing criminal background screening results and abuse prevention education information for ancillary staff. The Director of Nursing stated facility staff make rounds to check the status of residents […and] stated companions and sitters are oriented to the unit of their assigned resident but this does not include abuse prevention education.”

Our Baltimore nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that any failure to follow procedures and protocols to screen and train sitters and companions providing assistance for facility residents has the potential of causing serious harm and injury should an abusive or negligent event occur. The deficient practice by the nursing staff, sitters and companions fails to follow Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital policy and procedure regarding companions and sitters that reads in part:

“Ancillary staff function under the direct supervision of the assigned licensed nurse and resident’s care remains the responsibility of the facility.”

OVERLEA HEALTH AND REHABILITATION CENTER
6116 Belair Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21206
(410) 426-1424

A “For-Profit” 150-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols to Report and Investigate Any Act of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 03/23/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “report a resident to resident altercation to the Office of Health Care Quality (OHCQ).” This deficient practice directly affected one resident at the facility.”

The deficient practice initiated a thorough investigation “to determine if abuse of the resident has occurred. Current regulation requires any allegation of abuse or injury of unknown occurrence to be reported to the Office of Health Care Quality (OHCQ) within 24 hours in the final conclusion of the investigation to be reported within five days.”

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s 10:45 AM 05/03/2014 records that noted “while smoking [under supervision by the facility staff] the resident’s leg was bumped by another resident. The facility staff at the time documented [the resident] stood up from the wheelchair began to choke the other resident. The facility staff immediately intervene and separated the residents. The resident that was assaulted denied pain and no acute injury was noted.”

The state surveyor indicated that even though the incident was witnessed by employees of the nursing facility and interventions were immediately placed in an effort to separate the residents “the facility failed to report the resident to resident choking incident to [the Office of Health Care Quality (OHCQ).” During a 05/23/2015 12:00 PM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing, the state surveyor confirmed the failure to properly investigate and report the resident to resident choking incident to the proper authorities as required by state and federal nursing home agencies.

ENVOY OF PIKESVILLE
7 Sudbrook Lane
Pikesville, Maryland 21208
(410) 486-8771

A “For-Profit” -certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols to Investigate and Report Any Act of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/03/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “conduct a thorough investigation of an incident of employee to resident abuse as evidenced by conflicting documentation and failure to document action is taken to ensure resident safety.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after review of the facility reported incident on 12/01/2015 revealing “an allegation that [a Registered Nurse at the facility assaulted a resident]. While being evaluated in the emergency room on 07/27/2015 at 1:56 AM the resident reported that [they] were struck in the face by a staff member at the nursing home.” That documentation revealed that the Emergency Room triage nurse noted the “presence of bruising to the residents left forearm.”

The state surveyor reviewed the facility investigative documentation statement by a Geriatric Nurse Assistant dated 07/30/2015 stating “that on 07/26/2015, while conducting [their] last round, [they] observed blood in the resident’s nose and asked the resident what happened.” The Geriatric Nurse Assistant then stated they “clean the area and placed a resident in bed. The statement did not include the time of the occurrence or information about notifications to the Charge Nurse or Nurse Manager. A statement from the [Registered Nurse reported that they were] formed by [a member of the nursing staff] at approximately 10:30 PM that the resident had a nosebleed.” That is when the Registered Nurse “went to the resident’s room to attend the nosebleed [documenting they] applied pressure to the resident’s nose and noted a small cut to the right nostril.”

One of the resident’s family members approached the desk that evening at approximately 11:20 PM “saying the resident reported being struck by a staff member. The nurse responded she did not know anything about that. There is no indication that [the Registered Nurse] returned to the resident’s room to assess the resident and attempt to ascertain if the resident was injured or the source of the injuries. Another statement from [the Registered Nurse on 07/26/2015 reported that they] did not have any knowledge of the resident being struck.”

The responding officer provided a statement on 07/26/2015 indicating they “observe what to be a cut on the resident’s lip, bruising on the inside of the forearms and redness on the first knuckle of the left hand.”

The state investigator realized that the 12/01/2015 facility investigation did not reveal information required by state and federal nursing home regulators including statements taken from all employees on duty at the time of the event or any attempt to interview the resident. In addition, no comprehensive head to toe assessment was performed on the resident or any evaluation of staff actions, nor what actions the facility took to maintain the resident safety during the period of investigation or any need for education or counseling for employees involved in the incident.

The state investigator reviewed the medical record and investigative packet and recognize the “failed to reveal progress notes containing [the Licensed Practical Nurses] assessment of the resident’s condition or statement of the events that occurred on the evening of 07/27/2015. In an interview with the resident on 12/02/2015 [the resident] stated they did not want [that RN] to provide care.” The resident’s friend reported the nurse had been assigned to the resident since the incident despite staff having been told they did not want this nurse assigned to the resident’s care.”

The state investigator noted that the documentation provided by the facility “failed to address whether or not [the Registered Nurse] was removed from the resident’s care assignment, receive counseling, education or was interviewed by senior or administrative staff to determine of all appropriate actions were taken to ensure the safety of the resident.”

Staff Inattention Can Cause Serious Health Problems

The Baltimore County nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center LLC know that the most common complaint involving nursing facilities throughout Maryland is the home’s failure to respond to resident complaints. In many incidences, the staff is overworked and unable to provide the level of care the loved one requires. As a result, medications are not provided in a timely manner, resident’s hygiene suffers, physical assistance with activities of daily living are not provided or many of the signs and symptoms of serious illnesses are overlooked.

What to Do

If you suspect your loved one is suffering neglect, abuse or mistreatment while residing in a nursing facility in the Towson area, Nursing Home Law Center LLC can help. Our Maryland team of dedicated reputable attorneys has handled many cases throughout the state involving nursing home abuse, neglect and mistreatment.

Schedule your free, no obligation full case review by calling our Baltimore elder abuse law offices at (800) 926-7565 today. All cases are accepted on contingency, meaning no upfront fees or retainer are required for immediate legal representation.

For additional information on Maryland laws and information on nursing homes look here.

Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect Resources

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

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