St. Paul, MN Nursing Home Ratings

Overall Rating of 79 Nursing Homes
    Rating: 5 out of 5 (26) Much above average
    Rating: 4 out of 5 (20) Above average
    Rating: 3 out of 5 (13) Average
    Rating: 2 out of 5 (19) Below average
    Rating: 1 out of 5 (1) Much below average
August 2018

St Paul Minnesota Nursing Home Abuse AttorneyThe population of the United States is demographically getting older as new advancements in technology and medicines as allow the elderly to live well beyond their life expectancy. Unfortunately, many family members lack the capacity to provide the needs of senior citizens and instead entrust that care to for-profit nursing facilities and assisted-living homes throughout Minnesota. However, the St. Paul nursing home neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center LLC has also seen a significant rise in the number of cases involving neglect, abuse and mistreatment of Minnesota’s most vulnerable citizens.

Medicare releases information every month on all nursing homes in St. Paul based on the data gathered through surveys, investigations and inspections. The patient-protecting agency found serious violations and deficiencies at twenty (25%) of the seventy-nine St. Paul nursing homes that led to preventable resident harm. If your loved one was injured, abused, mistreated or died unexpectedly from neglect while living in a nursing facility in Minnesota, your family has legal rights to monetary recovery. We encourage you to contact the St. Paul nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center (800-926-7565) today to schedule a free, no obligation case evaluation to discuss a financial compensation lawsuit.

Many families face the horrific and heartbreaking reality that their loved one is a victim of abuse or neglect while residing in a nursing home. Many of these cases involve dehydration, malnutrition, pressure sores, life-threatening infections, mistreatment, resident to resident assault and unsanitary conditions.

Nearly 300,000 residents live within the St. Paul city limits, of which nearly 27,000 are 65 years and older. This number has risen substantially in the last few years as many elderly individuals choose to remain in Hennepin County throughout their retirement years. With the increasing population throughout the Minneapolis metropolitan area, the cases involving abuse and neglect are likely to increase in the years ahead.

St. Paul Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

Our Minnesota nursing home attorneys recognize that any form of elder abuse and neglect is inexcusable. We recognize that the only way to ensure that elder abuse is stopped in its track is to confront the abusers and take every step possible to ensure they are held accountable for their unacceptable actions.

In an effort to provide assistance, our Hennepin County elder abuse attorneys continuously examine, review and assess opened investigations, filed complaints, safety concerns and health violations against nursing facilities all throughout the state. We gather this information from national databases including the federal government website Medicare.gov. By publishing this data, we hope to help families who must decide where to place a loved one who requires a high level of quality care.

Comparing St. Paul Area Nursing Facilities

Our Hennepin County personal injury attorneys have compiled and published the list below detailing all of the St. Paul area nursing facilities that currently maintain below standard ratings compared with other homes nationwide. In addition, we have posted our primary concerns that details specific cases at these facilities that have harmed one or more residents through negligence, abuse or mistreatment.

GOLDEN LIVINGCENTER – LYNNHURST
471 Lynnhurst Avenue West
Saint Paul, Minnesota 55104
(651) 645-6453

A “For-Profit” 72-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure That All Residents Receive Services and Treatment to Continue and Improve Their Ability to Care for Themselves

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/04/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “implement consistent ambulation programs to maintain or improve [each resident] reviewed for ambulation.”

The deficient practice was noted by state surveyor who made an observation of a resident at 6:34 PM on 06/01/2015 when the resident “was seated in a wheelchair by the side of the bed.” At that time, the resident stated: “they don’t walk me to meals or to the bathroom like they are supposed to do.” Again, at 6:34 PM, during the interview, the resident “expressed concern of not walking to meals and the bathroom according to the physician’s orders.”

As a part of the investigation, the state surveyor reviewed the resident’s 03/24/2015 Quarterly MDS (Minimum Data Set) indicating that the resident “had intact cognition and was dependent with ADLs (activities of daily living).”

A review of the resident’s physician’s orders revealed “Walk to the bathroom with standby assist. Will toilet and wipe self. Walked to dining room with a two-wheeled walker and sit in an armchair. Every shift. Physical Therapy: resident will walk 50 feet using front wheeled walker with the assist of one BID (twice a day). Follow with wheelchair every day and evening shift to maintain the ability to walk.”

However, the state investigator conducted an 8:30 AM 06/02/2015 observation noting that the resident “was seated in the wheelchair at the dining room table and did not walk to the dining room for the meal.” A follow-up investigation the next morning at 7:35 AM noted that the resident “was seated in the wheelchair and stated, ‘they did not walk me to the bathroom this morning’.”

The state investigator conducted a 7:40 AM 06/03/2015 interview with the facility’s nursing assistant who provided the resident care. The nursing assistant “verified that [the resident] did not walk to the bathroom and the process was to walk her down the hallway after breakfast.”

During a subsequent 8:00 AM interview on the same day with the Director of Nursing, the Director verified that the resident “was to be walked according to the physician’s orders.”

Our St. Paul nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to ensure that every resident receives services, care and treatment to continue and improve their ability to care for themselves could place their health and well-being in danger. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Golden Living Center – Lynnhurst might be considered negligence or mistreatment because her actions failed to follow the Aide Assignment Sheet to direct the staff when providing care to the resident that reads in part:

“Restorative walking program: see documentation book and ADL (activities of daily living) sheet and room for cares.”

CREST VIEW LUTHERAN HOME
4444 Reservoir Boulevard Northeast
Columbia Heights, Minnesota 55421
(763) 782-1611

A “Not for Profit” 122-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce Policies to Prevent Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/03/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide training on abuse prevention prior to working with residents.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Crest View Lutheran Home involved “six employees reviewed for abuse prohibition.”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator upon review of employee files that revealed one employee was hired by the facility on 05/05/2015, beginning work on the following day and working alone for the first time 22 days later on 05/27/2015. However, the surveyor notes that the resident did not sign off on receiving Abuse Prevention Identification Training until one month later on 06/25/2015.”

On a second hire, another employee was hired on 08/04/2015 with the first day of work beginning that day and the first time working alone four days later on 08/08/2015. However, it was not until 11 days later on 08/19/2015 that the resident signed off on receiving the Abuse Prevention and Identification Training.

On 08/31/2015, the third employee signed the facility’s Nursing Safety Employee Orientation Checklist. However, the state investigator noted that there was a lack of documentation “showing abuse training was provided.”

The investigator conducted a 9:30 AM 09/03/2015 interview with a Registered Nurse the facility who stated, “I do train new employees on definitions of abuse on the first day, but it does not say it here (referring to the Nursing Safety Employee Orientation Checklist).” The Registered Nurse also stated that “the material covered reporting injuries – including a change in status to the nurse and how to do that […and] the training was not in depth, but employees, I tell them what abuse looks like and that they have to report it. I do not use the word mandatory.”

The state investigator also noted that the Registered Nurse being interviewed confirmed that one of the employees listed above “had not received abuse in-service training yet, and [that a fourth employee] no longer was employed by the facility but had also not received the training.”

An Interview with the Facility’s Director of Nursing “described what was covered with employees on their first day” as was covered in the “Nursing Safety Employee Orientation Checklist that included reporting falls, skin tear bruises, and resident disclosure of unknown falls injury.” The Director of Nursing also verified the checklist “did not indicate abuse reporting was covered […and] was unsure if employees were provided the packet on their first day, but acknowledged, most likely did not read it when handed it.”

The Director of Nursing had the “expectation that staff receives orientation including abuse prior to working with residents on the floor. Although she may have expected persons just finishing school to know about abuse, she would not have expected maintenance, dietary or housekeeping staff to know about abuse prior to being hired. How would they know that? It would be employers job to teach that.”

The investigator conducted an interview at 2:27 PM on 09/03/2015 with the facility Administrator who stated, “I expected staff to be trained on abuse immediately at orientation. My expectation is everyone we have on the floor would have an understanding of the vulnerable adult act, including maintenance and dietary […and] verified abuse was not listed on the Nursing Safety Employee Orientation Checklist, but would have expected it to have been.”

Our Columbia Heights nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failing to develop, implement and enforce policies that prevent abuse and neglect from occurring could place every resident in Immediate Jeopardy. The deficient practice of failing to train new employees how do identify and report incidences of abuse, neglect or mistreatment might also be considered negligence or abuse because their actions failed to follow the facility’s September 2014 policy title: Abuse Prohibition Policy that reads in part:

“All facility staff will be in-serviced upon first employment, and at least annually thereafter, regarding Resident’s Rights, including freedom from mistreatment, neglect or abuse, including injuries of unknown source, and misappropriation of property. Staff will be in-serviced on resident mistreatment, neglect and abuse including injuries of unknown source and misappropriation of property upon first employment and annually thereafter.”

TEXAS TERRACE CARE CENTER
7900 West 28th Street
Saint Louis Park, Minnesota 55426
(952) 920-8380

A “For-Profit” 118-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols When Reporting and Investigating Any Action or Alleged Action of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/17/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure resident allegations of abuse/neglect/mistreatment were reported immediately to the State Agency and investigated.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Texas Terrace Care Center involved two residents “who reported allegations of staff mistreatment.”

In addition, the state investigator handling the complaint noted the facility’s failure “to ensure bruising of unknown origin was immediately reported to the state agency and investigated for [a resident at the facility] reviewed with bruising of an unknown origin.”

The deficient practice was noted by the state investigator after reviewing a resident’s Quarterly MDS (Minimum Data Set) that “identified the resident had no cognitive impairment and was independent with ADLs (activities of daily living).”

The state investigator also reviewed the facility’s 05/06/2015 Resident Concern Report indicating that “Nursing Aides [were] being disrespectful to [the resident] in the dining room. Gives examples of [the Nursing Aides] serving her spaghetti and when she told him she was allergic to it they responded, ‘if you die, you die’.” The resident was unable to identify who stated this to her. The resident reports most issues are with evening nursing aides. Reports being frustrated and not wanting to come out to the dinner meal. [The resident] stated she did not come out for dinner yesterday.”

The state investigator conducted 11:25 AM 09/17/2015 interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who stated that “she was not aware why [the resident’s] alleged staff mistreatment was not reported, or why it was not investigated until 20 days after the allegation was made by [the resident] and verified [the resident’s] allegation should have been reported to the State Agency and investigated.” In addition, the Director of Nursing stated that “she would talk to the nurse manager and obtain more information.”

The Director of Nursing also provided the state surveyors an untitled handwritten document dated and signed by the Administrator on 09/17/2015 in regards to the resident’s “allegation of staff mistreatment on 05/26/2015. The document identified [that] the Administrator [had spoken to the resident and questioned] if she remembers any problems with the dietary aides, she said, ‘Nope, can’t remember’.”

The Administrator asked the resident “if anyone in dietary hurt her feelings [or] was rude.” The resident replied, “she can’t remember. Resident obviously did not have long-standing mental anguish resulting from resident concern. The Administrator uncertain why [the] investigation was not documented more thoroughly. Leadership change did occur in the dietary department on 07/01/2015. [The Administrator’s] best guess is that either documentation has been lost or the Registered Dietitian immediately unsubstantiated [the] report of ‘if you die, you die’.”

Our St. Louis Park nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failing to follow procedures and protocols when reporting and investigating any action or alleged action of abuse could place the health and well-being of the resident in Immediate Jeopardy. The deficient practice by the Administrator and nursing staff at Texas Terrace Care Center might be considered additional abuse or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow the facility’s July 2015 policy title: Prevention and Reporting: Resident Mistreatment, Neglect, Abuse, Including Injuries of Unknown Source and Misappropriation of Resident Property reads in part:

“All allegations of resident mistreatment will be reported to the State Agency immediately, and staff is directed to report all alleged violations to the Executive Director (Administrator) and Director of Nursing/designee immediately.”

HAYES RESIDENCE
1620 Randolph Avenue
Saint Paul, Minnesota 55105
(651) 690-4458

A “For-Profit” 40-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Maintain a Safe, Clean and Sanitary Environment for All Residents, Public and Staff Employees

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/30/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure residents rooms, bathrooms and bathing areas were maintained in a clean and sanitary manner.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff and employees at Hayes Residence affected 39 residents [all residents at the facility].”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after 30 interviews and observations “occurring on 12/20/2015 from 2:00 PM until 7:30 PM and again on 12/29/2015 from 8:00 AM until 11:00 AM.” These observations and interviews involved “residents’ rooms, toileting areas and bathing areas that were unsanitary and malodorous areas identified.

The surveyor conducted an environmental tour of the facility at 1:00 PM on 12/29/2015 with the facility’s Maintenance Supervisor. The tour included the bathing areas. As a part of the tour, it was revealed that one shower room “had a heavy buildup of brown debris, sand, particles, here behind the door and along the edges the flooring.”

It was also noted that a tub room “had a heavy accumulation of dust on the heat register, windowsill, window vertical blinds and floor moldings as well as along the floor edging had an accumulation of dry dark substances with sand and hair particles. There was an accumulation of a white substance on the top water spigots and guard ring. There were numerous dried splatters of tan/brown/yellow substances on the wall.” That area also had a “resident call light string/cords were not on a cleanable surface and they were discolored dark yellow and brown and areas of the string material.”

The investigator also noted that Room M3 “had a chair that had chipped away paint and was rusted in numerous areas with dark rust color on the frame of the chair and multiple areas of duct tape on the chair pad. The tub lift in [that room] was dusty, visibly soiled with the dried, dark substance and there were rusty appearing dark areas on the underside of the seat and attachments to the mechanical lift tub chair.”

As a part of the initial tour, it was noted that many residents’ and public shared toilet/bathroom areas that have foul odors present and heavy buildups of brown debris, sand, particles, here behind the door and along the edges of the flooring.”

Investigator conducted a 1:00 PM 12/30/2015 interview with the resident who “express living at the facility for years and never having the bed frame washed nor having the carpet vacuumed behind and under the furniture in all the years living at the facility.”

The Maintenance Supervisor was interviewed at 1:30 PM on the same day and “verify there was not a system to monitor or document the cleaning of rooms, toileting/bathing areas, bed frames, windowsills, heat registers, or any other area of the facility. There was not a policy and procedure for cleaning the facility and there was not a checklist for deep cleaning of the resident rooms in the facility.”

The state survey team requested policies and procedures for auditing deep cleaning and general cleaning of the resident’s bedrooms, window treatments, bed frames, heat registers, vents, bathing/tub rooms and toileting rooms. However, no policies or procedures were given to the survey team at the conclusion of the survey.

Our St. Paul nursing home neglect lawyers recognize that any failure to maintain a clean, safe and sanitary environment could place the health and well-being of residents, visitors, staff employees and others in jeopardy. The deficient practice by the cleaning staff, Maintenance Director and Administrator at Hayes Residence might be considered negligence or mistreatment of the residents.

GOLDEN LIVINGCENTER – ST LOUIS PARK PLAZA
3201 Virginia Avenue South
Saint Louis Park, Minnesota 55426
(952) 935-0333

A “For-Profit” 208-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure That Every Resident Receives Proper Treatment to Allow an Existing Bedsore to Heal or Prevent a New Bedsore from Developing

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/14/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “ensure a resident identified with a coccyx/sacral pressure ulcer received every other day physician order treatment.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Golden Living Center – St. Louis Park Plaza affected one resident at the facility.”

The complaint investigation involved a review of a resident of hospice medical records that indicated the resident “was usually able to make his needs known would occasionally use the call light […and] did have moderate cognitive impairment and did have a guardian in place.” The documentation also revealed that the resident “required extensive to total assistance with bed mobility, transferring, dressing, eating, toileting, personal hygiene and bathing.”

A review of the resident’s Comprehensive Skin Assessment indicated that the resident “was at high risk for pressure ulcer development.” In addition, the resident’s current 12/25/2015 Care Plan indicated that the resident “had a current pressure ulcer on his coccyx/sacrum/buttocks region and was to receive treatments as ordered.”

In addition, the state investigator reviewed the resident’s 06/21/2015 Wound Evaluation Flow Sheet indicating that the resident had a “Stage III [full thickness tissue loss] deep tissue injury to the coccyx/sacral area [that] measured 6.0 centimeters by 3.0 centimeters by 0.1 centimeters.”

The following day on 06/22/2015, “the physician ordered a coccyx wound treatment… to be cleaned with normal saline and patted dry. Apply skin barrier film to intact skin peri-wound and allowed to dry. Cover wound with foam adhesive. Change every other day as needed until resolved. To be completed on the day shift.”

Approximately one month later on 07/24/2015 the resident’s pressure ulcer had grown in size and now measured “10.0 centimeters by 10.0 centimeters, which was unstageable (full thickness tissue loss in which actual depth of the ulcer is completely obscured by slough (yellow, tan, gray, green or brown) and/or eschar (tan, brown or black) in the wound bed).”

The investigator reviewed the resident’s June 2015 treatment record documenting that the coccyx wound treatment was not completed on numerous days between 07/03/2015 and 07/15/2015. “This was verified by the [facility’s Director of Nursing].”

A 7:00 AM 08/04/2015 interview with the facility’s Licensed Practical Nurse providing care to the resident it was revealed that “she did not complete [the resident’s] coccyx treatment on 07/13/2015 because she did not have time.” Licensed Practical Nurse also “stated when they are working without a trained medication aide, it gets really crazy a lot of the time.”

The state investigator conducted an interview three days later on 08/07/2014 with the facility’s Director of Nursing who stated that “the nurses who had not documented the coccyx treatment were disciplined […and] if the treatment was not documented, it was not done.”

The state investigator conducted a 2:19 PM 08/10/2015 interview with the Licensed Practical Nurse who stated: “she had been employed for about eight weeks […and] she was not fully oriented to the computer system for documenting resident treatments.” Licensed Practical Nurse also stated that “she was only given four days of orientation and she should have had more orientation […and] she was not sure how many coccyx treatment [the resident] missed as she was not aware of the area until a nursing assistant told her about it.”

During that interview, the Licensed Practical Nurse also stated that “there were many times when she was the only nurse for 30 residents […and] stated that the trained medical aide scheduled was split between two units and there was no other nursing staff available.”

Our St. Louis Park nursing home neglect lawyers recognize that not providing proper treatment to residents with developed pressure ulcer could cause a significant decline in their health and well-being. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Golden Living Center – St. Louis Park Plaza might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions fail to follow the facility’s undated policy title: Skin Integrity Guideline “whose purpose was to decrease pressure ulcers and or wound formation by identifying those residents who are at risk and implementing appropriate interventions. The Care Plan is also to be implemented.”

Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect Resources
Client Reviews
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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
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After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric