Springfield, MO Nursing Home Ratings

Overall Rating of 24 Nursing Homes
    Rating: 5 out of 5 (14) Much above average
    Rating: 4 out of 5 (5) Above average
    Rating: 3 out of 5 (2) Average
    Rating: 2 out of 5 (1) Below average
    Rating: 1 out of 5 (2) Much below average
August 2018

Springfield Missouri Nursing Home Abuse LawyerEvery family wants the best for their aging spouse, parent, grandparent or elderly loved one. These individuals played an unforgettable and important part of our daily lives and deserve to receive the best quality care available. Unfortunately, many families are unable to ensure that all of their loved one’s needs are met while staying at home. The Springfield nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC understand that moving a loved one into nursing facilities is often the only option left.

The federal government through Medicare collects information every month on all nursing facilities in Springfield, Missouri based on data gathered through investigations, surveys and inspections. Currently, the publicly available database reveals inspectors identified serious deficiencies and violations at three (13%) of the twenty-four Springfield nursing homes that provide their residents substandard care. If your loved one was injured, abused, mistreated or died unexpectedly from neglect while living in a nursing facility in Missouri, you have legal rights to ensure your family receives monetary recovery. We encourage you to contact the Springfield nursing home abuse lawyers at Nursing Home Law Center (800-926-7565) today to schedule a free, no-obligation case review to discuss a financial compensation lawsuit.

Without vigilant observation and advocacy from someone who cares, many nursing home residents become the victim of elder abuse or mistreatment. The actual number of real cases involving mistreatment are unknown. This is because many victims lack the capacity to defend themselves or speak out for fear retaliation from those that are causing them harm.

Abuse and neglect in nursing facilities is a serious problem in Greene County. More than 165,000 residents live within the county’s boundaries of which nearly 20,000 are 65 years and older. The limited number of nursing homes in Springfield, Marshfield, Mount Vernon, Marionville and Willard and the growing number of the aging population in the local community will likely place an even greater burden on the nursing staff and administrators at many of these facilities. Overcrowded conditions, a lack of staffing and improper training are all conditions that can lead to physical assault, sexual abuse, neglect, abandonment and psychological/emotional harm.

Springfield Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

Our Missouri elder abuse attorneys recognize that nursing facilities are businesses and often times the only way the company can stay in business is to place profits in front of labor costs and services. Unfortunately, the greater need for profit often results in serious harm and injury to the residents. In an effort to help families, our Greene County nursing home neglect attorneys continuously assess, evaluate and review opened investigations, filed complaints, safety violations and health hazards at nursing facilities all throughout Missouri.

We gather this information from a variety of publicly available sources including Medicare.gov. We post the results in an effort to assist families in making the best decision when placing a loved one in a nursing home or for those families who already have a spouse, parent, grandparent or other loved one residing in a nursing facility in Missouri.

Comparing Springfield Area Nursing Facilities

The detailed list below was published by our Missouri elder abuse law firm outlining specific Springfield area nursing facilities that currently maintain substandard ratings compared with other homes nationwide. In addition, we have posted our primary concerns detailing cases that involve neglect, abuse or mistreatment that has led to harm, injury or death of the resident.

MANORCARE HEALTH SERVICES
2915 South Fremont
Springfield, Missouri 65804
(417) 883-4022

A “For-Profit” 194-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols to Eliminate the Potential of the Spread of Infectious Bacteria throughout the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated06/05/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide adequate infection control measures to prevent the spread of infection for [a resident at the facility] when staff placed the resident in contact isolation for Clostridium difficile Colitis (C-diff) and used the wrong disinfecting solution wipes to disinfect equipment and other care items that could be contaminated with infectious bacteria.”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after reviewing a resident’s medical records that revealed the resident was suffering from Clostridium difficile (C. diff) that “most commonly affects older adults and hospitals or in long-term care facilities and typically occurs after use of antibiotic medications, infections resistant to drugs, malnutrition or mental status changes.”

An investigation of the resident was made at 11:00 AM on 06/04/2015 when the “staff placed the resident in a private room [… with] an infection control cart outside the resident’s room. Inside the infection car control, staff placed personal protective items for staff and visitors to use before entering the resident’s room.” The infection control cart contained a purple container of wipes to disinfect and clean the resident’s room and equipment. However, the disinfecting wipes contained a virucidal, tuberculocidal, bacterial, and 55 percent alcohol. While these types of disinfecting wipes “tested effective against 26 microorganisms including tuberculosis, influenza A and infection resistant to drugs” it does not work against Clostridium difficile.

The state investigator noted that at 2:00 PM on the same day, a container of wipes at a different location on a different hall at the facility noted that it does kill Clostridium difficile. However, those disinfecting wipes were not used in the resident’s room who was suffering from C. diff.

An interview was conducted 11:24 AM on the same day on 06/04/2015 with the facility’s Certified Nursing Assistant who said that the “staff disinfected all equipment going into and out of the resident’s room […and] used the container of disinfecting wipes located at the top of the infection control cart to disinfect the equipment.” The Certified Nursing Assistant also said that “it is the nurse’s responsibility to ensure that the staff uses the correct disinfecting wipes” and that they were not sure whether or not the correct disinfecting wipes were being used in the resident’s room.

A few minutes later the state investigator interviewed the Licensed Practical Nurse providing the resident care who said that they “were unaware that staff was using the wrong disinfecting wipes” and that the staff “should use a bleach disinfecting wipe to disinfect the resident’s equipment.”

Our Springfield nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow procedures and protocols to eliminate the potential spread of infection throughout the facility could place the health and well-being of all residents in Immediate Jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at ManorCare Health Services could be seen as negligence or mistreatment because their actions fail to follow 2007 and 2010 CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Guidelines for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities that reads in part:

“Person-to-person transmission of infection disease primarily occurs through unprotected contact with blood and body fluids; associated with high rate of transmission; transmission in healthcare settings to be reported.”

“High-level disinfectant agent [is] capable of killing bacterial spores when used in sufficient concentration under suitable conditions. It, therefore, is expected to kill all other microorganisms – when using the same monitoring device for more than one resident, the monitoring device must be cleaned and disinfected after each use.”

SPRINGFIELD SKILLED CARE CENTER
2401 West Grand
Springfield, Missouri 65802
(417) 864-4545

A “For-Profit” 120-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Train All Employees on What to Do in Case of an Emergency and Carry out Announced Staff Drills

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 01/27/2016, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “educate staff on the process of relocating residents to a safe area in the event of a fire.” The failure of the nursing staff at Springfield Skilled Care Center affected one resident at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted by state surveyor after conducting staff interviews at 10:55 AM on 01/26/2015 as a part of the Fire Safety Question and Answers Portion of the Life Safety Code Inspection where employees at the facility were asked what “they would do in the event of a fire in a resident’s room.” Some of the employees answered:

  • The Certified Medical Technician at the facility said they “would get the resident out of the room, close the door and take the resident outside away from the fire.”
  • A Registered Nurse the facility said they “would get the resident out, try to put out the fire and take the residents out the exits.”
  • A Certified Nursing Aide said that they “would get a fire extinguisher and take the resident outside.”
  • A Dietary Aide at the facility said they “would get the resident out, pull the fire alarm and get the residents outside to the back parking lot.”
  • Another Certified Nursing Aide at the facility said that they “would get the resident out, shut the door and move the residents outside.”
  • The Manager of Plant Operations said, “he would expect the staff to take residents on the other side of the smoke barrier doors.”

The state surveyor noted that there was no training of logistics of what employees would be expected to do in the case of a fire to ensure residents safety. Our Springfield nursing home neglect lawyers recognize the failing to establish and prepare for a fire by performing staff drills could place the health and well-being of the residents in jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff, administrators and employees at Springfield Skilled Care Center might be considered negligence or mistreatment of the residents because their actions failed to follow the facility’s 01/06/2015 policy titled: Fire Evacuation Plan and Procedure, and Evacuation Instructions that reads in part:

“The facility is required to have a fire drill quarterly on each shift. The maintenance department is in charge of these fire drills and it is the responsibility of each employee to participate.”

“Staff are to remove residents from the immediate fire danger area to the nearest safe area. The first step is to evacuate the residents behind the nearest exiting smoke door in the event of a fire. The charge nurse on duty will determine if evacuation to the parking area is the next course of action.”

“Do not evacuate the building unless authorized by a charge nurse. Evacuate the residents behind existing smoke doors.”

WEBCO MANOR
1687 West Washington
Marshfield, Missouri 65706
(417) 859-5144

A “Not for Profit” 120-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 3 out of 5 possible stars

3 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Physical Restraints Unless Approved for Medical Treatment

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 03/09/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “develop a systematic process for evaluating whether or not a device was a restraint and [a failure to] assess the use of seatbelts as a restraint.” The failure of the nursing staff at Webco Manor affected two residents at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted by a state investigator who recognized that the “facility continued to use the seatbelts as a restraint for [two residents] for two months without documenting attempts to reduce the use or attempts to use less restrictive alternatives. The deficient practice involved [two residents].”

In the case involving one resident, the state investigator reviewed their 01/06/2015 Care Plan that revealed the resident “is at risk for falls due to functional decline in severe cognitive impairment; does not always realize and/or remember [their] limitations and will transfer self; Resident very impulsive; sensor monitor on bed and wheelchair to remind resident to call for help with transfers and ambulation… Do not leave the resident unattended in the wheelchair in the room; Offer to assist out of bed; assist with transfers and ambulation; keep the bed in the lowest position; keep the pathway clear of unnecessary clutter and well lit.”

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s Nurse’s Notes on multiple dates that revealed a variety of issues including that on 01/02/2014, the resident had been suffering with an acute illness for the last few days and while eating in their room “got up from [their] wheelchair, lost balance and sat on the floor; The staff place a safety alarm on [their] wheelchair as a reminder to seek help before getting out of the wheelchair.”

However, six days later on 01/08/2015 “staff held a fall meeting due to the resident’s falls on 01/02/2015 and 01/05/2015 stating that the staff “added a new intervention for pressure safety alarm… Related to falls… And will continue with this plan.”

However, I 01/21/2015, “the staff changed the pressure alarm in the wheelchair to a Velcro seatbelt alarm” and indicated that the resident demonstrated they knew how to remove the seat belt. Other notations made included that the staff “will continue to monitor the resident’s ability to use the seat belt correctly.”

In contrast, the resident’s 02/19/2015 Quarterly MDS (Minimum Data Set) reveaedl that the resident was severely cognitively impaired, [requires] extensive assistance needed for transfers and toilet use […and that] limited assistance is needed for walking in rooms and halls, locomotion on and off the unit, dressing, eating, personal hygiene and bathing. Limited assistance needed for moving from seated to standing position, moving on and off the toilet, and surface to surface movement.” The state investigator notes that the Quarterly MDS also states “No restraints.”

The Nurse’s Notes also revealed that “on 03/03/2015, the staff received a new physician’s orders revealing that “the device should remind the resident not to get up unassisted.” On that same day, “the resident had a pressure sensor alarm at all times and a Velcro seatbelt while in the wheelchair to remind the resident to ask for assistance and to alert staff so that the staff can offer assistance.”

However, an observation made by the state investigator 10:45 AM on 03/06/2015 showd that the “staff positioned the resident in the wheelchair secured with a Velcro seatbelt […and] the resident was alert but very confused. The staff asked the resident to remove the Velcro seatbelt and the resident was unable to remove it.”

A couple of hours later at 12:15 PM, the staff “parked the resident in the dining room and placed [their] food tray in front of the resident on the dining room table. The staff failed to remove the resident’s seat belt while [they] ate lunch.”

Later that afternoon at 2:10 PM on 03/06/2015, the state investigator Interviewed the Facility’s Certified Nursing Assistant providing the resident care who said “the care plans for the residents were located behind the resident’s doors […and] the resident can remove the seat belt sometimes, but not always […and] the Velcro seatbelt was not a restraint, because [the resident] could remove the device sometimes. If it was a restraint, the staff needed to remove the device every two hours.”

Five minutes later at 2:15 PM, the Certified Nursing Aide and the surveyor “checked behind the resident’s door and found [that there was] no care plans.”

10 minutes later, the investigator conducted an interview with the facility’s Licensed Practical Nurse providing the resident care who stated that “the resident’s Velcro seatbelt was a restraint because he kept the resident from getting out of [their] wheelchair. The resident cannot remove the Velcro seatbelt every time of the staff asks [them] to do so.”

A 1:07 PM 03/09/2015 interview was conducted with the facility’s Director of Nursing who said that “the residents’ seatbelts were a restraint and staff should assess the Velcro seatbelt quarterly. The staff needed to release the Velcro seatbelts every two hours and at meals.” The Director of Nursing also indicated that “she just became aware of the issue and started correction and reevaluation on all residents with devices.”

Our Marshall Field nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failing to provide each resident an environment of free of unnecessary physical restraints minimizes their quality of life. The deficient practices by the nursing staff at Webco Manor might be considered mistreatment or abuse because their actions failed to follow the facility’s undated policy titled: Acknowledgment of Facility Restraint Philosophy and Policies that reads in part:

“Restraints shall only be used for the safety and well-being of residents and only after other alternatives have been tried unsuccessfully. Restraint shall only be used to treat the resident’s medical symptoms and never for discipline or staff convenience.” “Prior to placing a resident in an enabler/restraint, the Committee shall review the Enabler Restraints. The Committee shall attempt to identify residents at risk for injury/entrapment and falls and indicate if the resident could benefit from the enabler/restraint use. Medical symptoms that may be temporary, for which the enabler/restraint is to be used, will be identified. Symptoms may be temporary or long-term.”

“Restraint shall only be used upon the written order from physician and only after informing the resident and/or their legal representative. The order shall include the following: the medical reason for the restraint, how the restraint will be used to benefit the resident’s medical condition, and the type of restraint and period of time for the use of the restraint.”

MARSHFIELD CARE CENTER
800 South White Oak
Marshfield, Missouri 65706
(417) 859-3701

A “For-Profit” 77-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure the residents at the facility are free from inappropriate sexual behavior of other residents

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/22/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “protect residents and maintain an environment free of harassment of [one resident at the facility] with a documented history of increased sexual behavior and impulse control who staff witnessed standing over, with hands near the privates of another dependent resident.”

The deficient practice was noted by state surveyor after witnessing a resident who was laying “in bed with covers and undergarments pulled down staring at his/her exposed body despite multiple attempts to redirect. The staff also witnessed the resident make sexual remarks to another dependent resident, then later crawled into bed with the resident without [their] consent.”

Our Marshfield nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failing to take every necessary precaution to ensure that residents are free from inappropriate sexual behavior of other residents could place the health and well-being of every resident in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Marshfield Care Center might be considered mistreatment or abuse because their actions failed to follow the facility’s 06/13/2014 policy titled: Policy and Procedure Abuse Neglect that reads in part:

“The resident has a right to be free from verbal, sexual, physical and mental abuse, corporal punishment, and involuntary seclusion. It is the policy of the facility to ensure that each resident is treated with dignity and care, free from abuse and neglect and to take swift and immediate action to investigate and adjudicate alleged resident abuse and neglect.”

“Residents must not be subject to abuse by anyone including, but not limited to, facility staff, other residents, consultants or volunteers, staff or other agency serving the individual, family members are or legal guardians, friends or other individuals.”

“Sexual abuse includes, but is not limited to, sexual harassment, sexual coercion or sexual assault.”

“Training: it is the responsibility of the Administrator and Director of Nursing services to ensure the training of employees, through orientation and ongoing in-services on issues related to abuse prohibition practices.”

“The Administrator Director of Nursing services shall analyze the occurrences to determine what changes are needed, if any, to facility practices to prevent further occurrences.”

The OZARKS METHODIST MANOR
205 South College
Marionville, Missouri 65705
(417) 258-2573

A “Not for Profit” 78-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols When Providing Care and Treatment to Prevent a New Bedsore from Developing or Allowing an Existing Bedsore to Heal

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 01/09/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “consistently provide ongoing skin assessments [for five residents at the facility].” The failure of the facility involved four residents who “were at risk for the development of pressure ulcers. The facility identified one resident with a pressure ulcer to the surveyors at the onset of the survey.”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator upon review of a resident’s records when requested the resident’s Bath Sheets completed by a Certified Nursing Assistant over the last three months. However, “the facility was unable to provide any documentation.”

The surveyor also noted that the “resident’s medical record showed staff did not complete any weekly skin assessments for at least the last six months (according to the facility’s policy) although the resident was at high risk for the development of pressure ulcers.” This was determined by a review of the resident’s 04/22/2014 Quarterly Nursing Assessment – assessment taken every three months to determine the resident’s risk for developing pressure ulcers. The assessment revealed that the resident has “occasional incontinence of bowel and bladder… Some redness of perineal area (groin and surrounding area) and buttocks” and a Norton Scale result of 13 (a skill used to determine a resident’s skin condition) that revealed the resident was at “high risk” for developing pressure ulcers.”

A review of the resident’s Quarterly Nursing Assessment revealed the resident had “redness of the perineal and buttocks, pressure prevention screen (Norton) staff did not complete.”

The resident process Quarterly MDS (Minimum Data Set) revealed that the resident was “cognitively impaired; requires the assistance of staff for bed mobility, transfers, toileting and bathing; at risk for developing pressure ulcers.”

The surveyor noted that even though the resident is at high risk for developing pressure ulcers, the facility failed “to provide preventative routine assessments on the resident’s skin, according to the facility policy, to ensure [that the resident] did not develop any pressure ulcers.”

Our Marionville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow procedures and protocols when providing care to prevent the development of a new bedsore or allow an existing bedsore to heal could place the resident’s health in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at The Ozarks Methodist Manor might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions fail to follow the facility’s policy titled: Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Management that reads in part:

“A standardized assessment for skin risk is completed upon admission; All risk factors are Care Planned at least one intervention per risk factor; positioning/pressure reduction devices are in place for residents with actual or high risk for skin breakdown; weekly skin assessments are completed and documented by licensed staff, and audit process is assigned in place to ensure completion of weekly assessments.”

Certified Nurses’ Aides (CNAs) are required to document resident’s skin appearance of the time of the resident’s scheduled bath/shower”

“Weekly wound rounds are conducted that include stage, description, management, progress and treatment.”

VERNON PLACE CARE CENTER
1425 South Landrum
Mount Vernon, Missouri 65712
(417) 466-2260

A “For-Profit” 60-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 3 out of 5 possible stars

3 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Unnecessary Physical Restraints

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 02/04/2016, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “assess the need for restraints prior to application, identify the medical condition the restraints would treat, and [a failure to] reevaluate routinely whether the restraint was the least restrictive possible [method].” The failure of the nursing staff at Mount Vernon Pl. care Center that affected two residents at the facility.”

The deficient practice was noted by state surveyor after a review of a resident’s 10/07/2015 Care Plan that showed that the “resident was at risk for falls related to dementia diagnosis; the staff wrote a goal that the resident will not have any injuries related to falls by the review date […and] the staff wrote an intervention to meet the goal [which was the use of] a seatbelt alarm.”

The resident’s Care Plan also noted that there was nothing written “related to restraining the resident and did not address the restrictive properties of the belt. Staff wrote nothing showing the medical symptom that require the use of the restraint or that the restraint was the least restrictive device possible.”

The state surveyor also reviewed the resident’s 10/07/2015 Care Plan Social Progress Notes that revealed the resident “requires both belt and bed alarm due to decreased cognition and decreased safety awareness.” The facility’s 12/30/2015 Nursing Aide Care Plan lists “Velcro belt under the section for personal/safety devices.” However, the state investigator noted that “the staff circled ‘No’ in the restraint/enabler box on the same document.”

An interview with the resident was conducted at 11:30 AM on 01/11/2016 where the “resident was able to voice [their] needs.” The staff called the facility called Hospice at 1:00 PM on 01/29/2016 to inform “them that the resident seatbelt alarm for [their] wheelchair was broken and would not shut off.” However, the nurses “wrote nothing in the note showing the medical symptom that require the use of the restraint or that the restraint was the least restrictive device possible.”

The investigator reviewed the resident’s medical records that revealed that the staff “did not document an assessment prior to using the seat belt restraint […and] wrote nothing in the record showing the medical symptom the restraint treated [nor was there any documentation of] ongoing assessments since beginning the use of the restraint in January 2015, and did not assess recently or any time previously to show the seat belt restraint was and continued to be the least restrictive device possible to enable the resident to obtain or maintain [their] highest practical level of physical and psychosocial well-being.”

Upon multiple observations of the resident on 02/01/2016 and 02/03/2016, the surveyor noted: “that something was wrong with a seatbelt and they were waiting for someone from hospice to come and fix it.”

A few minutes later at 8:40 AM on February’s third 2016, the Director of Nursing at the facility provided information including that “she was unaware of any assessment completed by the nursing staff or therapy staff for the use of the seat belt restraint.” The Director of Nursing also indicated that “Seatbelt use required a physician’s orders […and] the resident may not be able to unfasten the belt command.”

The surveyor conducted a 02/03/2016 interview with the Certified Nursing Assistant providing the resident care who said that “the resident has a belt because [they] tend to slide out of the wheelchair. The resident is able to undo the belt [… but] cannot always verbalize what [they] want. Sometimes the resident does not like having the belt around [their] waist.

Our Mount Vernon nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failing to obtain proper authorization and informed consent prior to using a physical restraint on a resident could be considered abuse or mistreatment. The deficient practice of the nursing staff did not follow their current restraint policy that reads in part:

“The facility and medical director encourage freedom from restraint for a resident or the use of the least restrictive restraints from the resident’s physical, mental and emotional condition warrant”

“The facility will do a comprehensive assessment to determine the resident specific medical conditions. If a resident is in restraint, the assessment will show the presence of a specific medical condition that would require the Use of Restraints, though symptoms being treated on how the Use of Restraints will assist the resident and reaching his or her highest level of physical and psychosocial well-being. This includes concerning the least restrictive therapeutic intervention before using restraints as part of treating the resident’s medical symptoms. The least restrictive therapeutic intervention is the one that provides the resident the maximum amount of freedom of movement.”

WILLARD CARE CENTER
400 West Walnut Lane
Willard, Missouri 65781
(417) 742-3593

A “For-Profit” 66-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 3 out of 5 possible stars

3 stars rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Immediately Notify a Resident’s Physician and Family Members of a Change in the Resident’s Situation Including a Decline in Health, Injury or Room Change

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/11/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “notify the physician in a timely manner [in involving a resident] who fell and sustained a head injury.”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator reviewed a resident’s Admission MDS (Minimum Data Set) that revealed the resident “had severe cognitive impairment.” Further review of the resident’s Nursing Flow sheets also revealed that “on 12/03/2015 at 2:35 PM, a Licensed Practical Nurse providing the resident care documented Physical Therapy staff called the nurse to the therapy room. Upon arrival, the nurse observed the resident had approximately a 2.0 centimeter laceration, with a moderate amount of blood to the left side of [their] head.”

The Licensed Practical Nurse called to the scene “cleaned the laceration, apply a cool wet cloth until the bleeding stopped, then applied triple antibiotic ointment to the area. The nurse informed the Director of Nursing. The nurse wrote a note in the physician’s communication book, but did not immediately notify the physician of the fall or laceration.”

Further review revealed that at 11:15 AM the next day on 12/04/2015, the day shift Licensed Practical Nurse “documented that the previous nurse said that the resident’s head was still bleeding from the fall [they] have the previous day […and] the nurse assessed the resident then notify the physician who sent the resident to the emergency room. The resident left the facility at 8:15 AM, approximately 18 hours after the resident fell and sustained a laceration.” Later that afternoon at 3:00 PM, the Licensed Practical Nurse “documented the resident returned from the emergency room at 1:30 PM with one stitch to [their laceration].”

During a 2:30 PM 12/11/2015 conducted an interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing, the Director “said immediately after the resident fell, she saw [the Licensed Practical Nurse] gathering supplies out of the treatment cart […and told the Licensed Practical Nurse] if the laceration continued to bleed to deal with it.”

The Signs and Symptoms of Abuse
  • Physical Abuse – In a nursing facility, physical abuse is recognized as the use of physical force against the resident that results in bodily injuries, impairment or physical pain. However, this type of abuse is not limited simply to an act of violence like hitting, striking or beating. It can include unauthorized physical restraint, inappropriate use of medication, physical (corporal) punishment, force-feeding or another type of physical assault. This can involve:
  • Joint dislocation, sprains, internal bleeding/injury
  • Open wounds, punctures, cuts, bruises, untreated injury at any stage of healing
  • Skull fractures, broken bones and bone fractures
  • Rope marks, lacerations, welts, black eyes and bruises
  • A sudden change in the elder’s behavior
  • Laboratory results indicating medication overdose or no results in the resident’s bloodstream of prescribed medication
  • Broken glasses that could be a physical sign that the resident is subjected to restraint or punishment
  • Any indicator that the resident is being slapped, hit, kicked, beaten, bitten or mistreated
  • The refusal of the caregiver to allow the resident access to any visitor in a private area
  • Sexual Assault – In a nursing environment, sexual assault involves non-consensual sexual contact or sexual interaction. Typically, many individuals are sexually attacked who lack the capacity to give consent. These cases usually involve unwanted and undesired touching, sexual assault involving rape, coerced nudity, sodomy or sexually explicit photographs. These cases typically involve:
  • Unexpained genital infections or venereal disease
  • Bruising around the genital area or breasts
  • Unexplained bleeding
  • Bloody, stained, or torn underclothing
  • A victim’s complaint involving rape or sexual assault
  • Neglect – Many nursing home residents are victims of neglect where the caregivers fail or refuse to fulfill their obligations and duties to meet the health and hygiene needs of the resident. However, neglect can also involve a failure of any individual with a fiduciary responsibility to provide a level of care to the elder. The most common types of neglect involve:
  • Making the resident live in unsafe or hazardous conditions
  • Failing to treat or attend to the resident’s health problems
  • Signs of malnutrition or dehydration
  • Unsanitary conditions or poor personal hygiene
  • Undetected or untreated facility-acquired pressure sores
  • Any report by the others of mistreatment or neglect
  • Financial Exploitation – Out of all of the signs and symptoms of abuse and neglect in nursing facilities, material or financial exploitation often goes unnoticed. This could include the improper use of assets, medication, property or funds that belonged to the resident, stealing or misusing the elder’s money or possessions or deceiving/coercing the elder into signing paperwork or documents. The most common types of nursing home resident material exploitation cases involve:
  • A sudden change in the resident’s banking practices or account
  • The inclusion of unauthorized names on the bank signature card of an account belonging to the resident
  • An unexpected discovery of the nursing home resident’s signature that was forged to the financial gain of another
  • An unexplained disappearance of the resident’s valuable possessions or funds
  • Unexplained missing narcotics and other medications that should have been given to the resident per the physician’s orders
  • An unexpected sudden transfer of the resident’s assets to another

Not all signs and symptoms of abuse, neglect and mistreatment are obvious. Typically, the only way to be assured that the loved one is being provided adequate care is to serve as their advocate and hire a personal injury attorney who specializes in abuse and neglect cases.

Hiring an Attorney

If you suspect your loved one is the victim of nursing home neglect or abuse, do not remain silent. It is crucial to have legal representation on your side by hiring a skilled personal injury attorney with a comprehensive understanding of Missouri tort law. The Springfield nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC fight aggressively to protect the rights of defenseless individuals who have been abused or neglected by caregivers or others.

In addition to ensuring that all parties responsible for causing your loved one harm, injury or death are held legally liable, we can help your family pursue compensation to ensure your loved one receives the recompense they deserve. We encourage you to make contact with our law offices today at (800) 926-7565 to discuss the merits of your case. We accept wrongful death lawsuits, personal injury claims and nursing home abuse/neglect cases on contingency. This means that all legal fees are paid only out of a jury trial award or after we successfully negotiate an acceptable out of court settlement.

For additional information on Missouri laws and information on nursing homes look here.

Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect Resources

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric