Chattanooga Tennessee Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer

Chattanooga Elder Neglect LawyersFamilies always have the best intention when placing an elderly parent, grandparent or spouse in a nursing facility. Many of these nursing homes paint their place as an idyllic environment where the loved one will receive compassionate and loving care by competent nursing staff. While it seems like the ideal solution, the true picture of reality often involves nursing home residents that live in less than a perfect environment. In fact, The Chattanooga nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have handled many cases where the resident was ignored, isolated, physically attacked, emotionally and mentally abused or neglected, stripped of respect and dignity or provided substandard care.

Abuse and neglect occurring in nursing facilities are often difficult to recognize. This is because many of the signs and symptoms are covered up by the nursing facility staff, employees, other residents and even the victims themselves. In fact, in many incidences, the victim will remain completely silent in fear of retaliation of an angry caregiver or another resident who has cause them harm.

The number of incidences involving abuse and neglect has been rising significantly over the last few decades. This is not surprising seeing how the number of elderly residents within the Chattanooga Tennessee city limits has top well over 22,000 out of the 175,000 residents. This number is even higher when counting for all the retirees living all throughout Hamilton County. Many of the local area nursing facilities have become significantly overcrowded in an attempt to keep up with the high demand of skilled nursing beds and the shortage of qualified medical personnel to meet the needs of their residents.

Chattanooga Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

The cases involving neglect and abuse in nursing facilities has grown to epidemic proportions. Often times, the owners and operators of nursing homes care more about generating profits than providing an enjoyable, safe environment for the elderly residents. In an effort to help, our Chattanooga elder abuse attorneys continuously post information about safety concerns, health violations, opened investigations and filed complaints from publicly available databases including Medicare.gov.

Many families choose to use this information is an effective solution for determining where to place a loved one who requires the best care in the safest environment. Others value this data to better understand the level of care their loved one might be receiving while already residing in a Chattanooga area nursing facility.

Comparing Chattanooga Area Nursing Facilities

The list below has been compiled by our Tennessee nursing home neglect attorneys that details every nursing facility throughout the Chattanooga area currently maintaining substandard readings in comparison to other facilities nationwide. In addition, our law office as posted our primary concerns about specific cases at each of these facilities that contributed to their low ratings as determined by state and federal surveyors, inspectors and investigators. Some of these cases involve substandard care, a failure to control the spread of infection, medication errors, poor hiring practices and other serious problems.

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Information on Tennessee Nursing Home Abuse & Negligence Lawsuits

Our attorneys have compiled data from settlements and jury verdicts across Tennessee to give you an idea as to how cases are valued. Learn more about the cases below:

LIFE CARE CENTER OF RED BANK
1020 Runyan Dr.
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37405
(423) 877-1155

A “For-Profit” 148-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Necessary and Proper Treatment Every Resident with Special Needs Including Those with Feeding Tubes to Ensure Their Health and Well-Being

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/26/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure medications were administered per enteral tube (feeding tube) and given safely and accurately for [a resident at the facility].”

The deficient practice was noted by the state investigator after a review of the facility’s August 2015 Physician’s Recapitulation Orders that revealed the nursing staff is to provide medication as prescribed by the doctor through an enteral (feeding) tube “every four hours. Flush PEG tube with 30-milliliter water before and after medication administration.

However, the state investigator made an observation at 8:15 AM on 08/25/2015 in a resident’s room that revealed a Licensed Practical Nurse “in the resident’s room, flush the two with 15 ccs of water (without checking for placement), drew the [resident’s medication] up in a 60 cc syringe, which the medication through the tube and immediately flushed the tube with 30 ccs of water.”

The investigator then conducted an 8:30 AM interview with a Licensed Practical Nurse the same morning who confirmed that the Licensed Practical Nurse “failed to verify the tube placement with the syringe prior to the enteral tube flush/medication administration and put the medication through a 60 cc syringe into the enteral tube.” It was also revealed during the interview that the Licensed Practical Nurse “does not check the tube placement every time.”

Later that day 4:25 PM, the state investigator interviewed the facility’s Assistant Director of Nursing who confirmed that their “expectations would be to always check placement prior to any use of the tube and generally instill medications and not push medications.”

Our Chattanooga nursing home neglect attorneys recognized failed to follow protocols, policies and procedures when providing care to residents requiring special services including medication administration through feeding tubes could place the resident’s health and well-being in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practices of the nursing staff at Life Care Center of Red Bank might also be considered mistreatment or negligence of the resident because their actions failed to follow the facility’s policy title: Feeding Tube Instilling Medication that reads in part:

“Medications are administered appropriately and safely when a resident has a feeding tube in place. Attach the syringe to the end of the two main insert 20 ccs (cubic centimeter) of air. Check placement and patency of auscultation. If the tube is not adequately placed, do not give the medication and do not flush with water.”

ALEXIAN VILLAGE OF TENNESSEE
671 Alexian Way
Signal Mountain, Tennessee 37377
(423) 886-0100

A “Not for Profit” 114-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent an Avoidable Fall from Occurring

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/21/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “prevent a fall for [a resident at the facility] resulting in harm to the resident.” In addition, the facility also failed “to provide the appropriate number of staff assistance for transfers for [a resident].”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after a review of a resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) revealing that the “resident had cognitive impairment, memory problems, and required extensive assistance with transfers and ambulation.”

The surveyor then conducted a review of the 06/27/2015 Nurse’s Notes that documented: “Called to resident’s room at 1:20 AM by [a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)]. The resident found lying on her right side on the floor next to the bed. Unable to answer what happened or if she hit her head. Call made to Doctor to update resident condition. Order received to send to the hospital for evaluation and treatment.”

The facility’s 06/27/2015 Documentation of the Fall was reviewed and revealed “interventions were in place the time of the call and included a low bed and nonskid socks. Medical record review revealed [that the resident] was readmitted to the facility [after the hospital stay].”

The following week, the 07/04/2015 Plan of Care for the resident documented: “Need two-person staff assist with transfers. Support with transfer with use of Hoyer lift (a type of total dependence non-weight-bearing lift).” In addition, the resident’s Physical Therapy Evaluation and Plan of Treatment documentation noted a Start Date the following day on 07/05/2015. The documentation revealed: “Transfers = Total dependence without attempts to initiate unable to perform sit to stand despite maximum system 2 [staff members]. The patient will require the use of total dependence lift for out of bed transfer.”

The following day on 07/06/2015, the facility’s Nurse’s Notes revealed at 11:30 AM: “CNA and this nurse were transferring the resident to restroom using a sit to stand lift  (a type of weight bearing lift). Encouraging resident to bear weight on her right leg and toe touch with the left. The resident was cooperative and then suddenly said no and let go of the lift crossing her hands, losing her balance in the lift. [The] CNA and Charge Nurse Assistant resident by lowering her to the floor. Assisted resident back to the wheelchair with three staff members and then assisted the resident to bed with an assist from physical therapy department.”

The next day on 07/07/2015 at 1:11 AM, the Nurse’s Notes revealed: “Assessment of the surgical site shows severe redness and warmth to two staples on left it. The middle site has a two-inch surrounding area that is hard and red. Will alert day shift nurse of the need to call surgeon in [the morning].” Later that morning, the nursing staff assessed the resident’s surgical site and noted a “red, hard, swollen two inches by two inches” area on the resident’s skin. The medical doctor was “called and informed. The new orders to apply warm compresses to the area for 20 minutes. Will continue to monitor.”

On 07/08/2015, the Physicians Telephone Orders revealed: “x-ray to left hip and femur pain.” A mobile image was taken that same day to the resident’s left hip that revealed: “Findings: screw threads projecting beyond the superior margin of the femoral neck and appearing to impinge upon the lateral aspect of the acetabulum [the socket of the hip bone]. Impressions: Recurrent fracture of the femoral neck versus malposition dynamic screw of the femoral neck. Notified Doctor wants to see the resident [in two days] on 07/10/2015.”

The resident had a hospital consultation that revealed that the recent fall and admission to the hospital was required for “a total hip arthroplasty [a surgical replacement or reconstruction of a joint] on that side.”

The state investigator conducted a 10/21/2015 interview with the facility’s Medical Director and Director of Nursing. The director “confirmed the facility failed to prevent a fall, resulting in harm to the resident, by not using the appropriate lift for transfer of the resident.” The Medical Director also “confirm the resident’s fall could have caused the re-injury to the resident’s hip.”

Our Signal Mountain nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow physician’s orders when transferring residents with special needs could place the health and well-being of the resident in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Alexian Village of Tennessee might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions likely lead to serious injury of the resident requiring extensive surgery to reconstruct or replace the resident’s hip.

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The HEALTH CENTER AT STANDIFER PLACE
2626 Walker Rd
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421
(423) 490-1599

A “For-Profit” 444-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce Procedures and Protocols That Can Control or Keep Infection from Spreading throughout the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/05/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure eye medication was not contaminated during administration to both eyes for [a resident].” In addition, a notation was also made of the facility’s failure to “ensure good infection control practices during dining.”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after a review of the facility’s July 2015 Physician’s Recapitulation Orders that revealed that a resident was to receive one drop of artificial tears solution in both eyes to treat an inflammation to the inner eye (conjunctivitis).

The resident’s Progress Notes documented on 03/12/2015 and 05/11/2015 revealed: Recurrent blepharitis (infection of the eyelid). Recurrent keratoconjunctivitis (dry eye syndrome).

The state investigator made two observations at 9:56 AM and 10:01 AM on 08/04/2015 in the resident’s room where Licensed Practical Nurse was observed placing “the tip of [the resident’s medicated] ointment to in the right eyelid and administered one application of the ointment to the right eyelid. Continued observation revealed [that the Licensed Practical Nurse] use the same tube of ointment, placed the tip in the left eyelid, administered one application of the ointment to the left eyelid and returning ointment to the medication cart available for resident use.”

The surveyor conducted an interview with that Licensed Practical Nurse in the 100 East Hall a few minutes later at 10:05 AM. The nurse confirmed that they “had touched the tip of the tube to both eyelids during the administration of the ointment in place the ointment in the medication cart [which was then] available for use by the next nurse.”

An interview was then conducted on 8:15 AM on 08/05/2015 with the Assistant Director of Nursing in charge of educating the nurses who “confirmed the licensed staff was in-serviced and monitored during medication administration to avoid touching the eye or eyelids when eye medications were administered.” The surveyor noted that as a part of the interview, the Assistant Director of Nursing also “confirmed touching the eyelid contaminated the eye medication in the nurses were instructed to dispose of the medication and reorder if contaminated.”

Our Chattanooga nursing home neglect lawyers recognize a failing to follow protocols when administering medication could place the health and well-being of that resident and potentially all the other residents at the facility in jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at the Health Center at Standifer Place might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow the facility’s 04/24/2014 policy title: Medication Administration: Eye Drops that reads in part:

“Hold the tip over the eye taking care to avoid touching the eye or eyelid.”

CONSULATE HEALTH CARE OF CHATTANOOGA
8249 Standifer Gap Road
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421
(423) 892-1716

A “For-Profit” 127-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Fall from Occurring

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/04/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “ensure a bed alarm safety device was functioning for [a resident at the facility who was] reviewed for falls.”

As a part of the investigation into the complaint, the state surveyor reviewed the resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) that revealed the resident “had severe cognitive impairment and required assist with all ADL (activities of daily living).” In addition, the resident’s 05/25/2015 Care Plan revealed that “the resident was at risk for injury related to a history of Falls, gait and balance problems, and Parkinson’s disease.” A continued review of the resident’s records revealed that “the resident was to have a bed and chair alarm, to be checked for placement and function every shift; pressure sensitive pad to his chair and bed; and a Velcro self-release belt with an alarm to alert staff of unsafe transfers.”

The incident involved in the complaint investigation was first documented in the resident’s 2:15 AM 06/15/2015 Nurse’s Notes revealing that “the resident fell in the room.” In addition, the Certified Nursing Assistant “revealed [they heard] the resident yell out” when the Certified Nursing Assistant “was walking by the nurse’s station. [The nurse] went into his room and he was on the floor.”

The state investigator reviewed the facility’s 06/15/2015 Root Cause Investigation Report that along the incident. The report revealed: “Alarm in use. Bed alarm not sounding. The resident will get up and use the toilet with assistance at night. Complaint with the use of Walker and wheelchair with reminders. Non-compliant with the use of call light. Decreased safety awareness and non-compliant with asking staff for assistance. Replaced battery to bed alarm.”

An interview was conducted at 11:45 AM on 08/06/2015 with the facility’s Staff Development Coordinator who confirmed: “staff was supposed to check alarms and fix or replace them if they were not functioning.”

Our Chattanooga Tennessee elder abuse attorneys recognize a failing to follow steps to provide every resident in an environment free of accident hazards and a failure to provide adequate supervision that could avoid a preventable fall from occurring but placed the health and well-being of the resident an immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice is the nursing staff at Consulate Health Care of Chattanooga might be considered mistreatment or negligence because their actions likely lead to the fall of a resident.

LIFE CARE CENTER OF OOLTEWAH
5911 Snow Hill Road
Ooltewah, Tennessee 37363
(423) 531-0600

A “For-Profit” 120-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide a Standard of Care That Meets Professional Standards to Ensure Residents Health and Well-Being Are Not Placed in Immediate Jeopardy

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/17/2015, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “follow facility policy for transcribing medication orders and reconciling physician’s orders (physician’s recalculation orders) with medication administration records to ensure no medication errors occurred.”

In addition, the state investigator noted the facility’s “failure to result in a significant medication error and placed one resident in immediate jeopardy (a situation in which the facility’s noncompliance with one or more requirements of participation has caused, or is likely to cause serious injury, harm, impairment or death). The facility’s failure was likely to place any resident receive medication at risk for immediate jeopardy.”

The state surveyor informed the facility’s Administrator, Regional Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Nursing at 10:40 AM on 09/16/2015 that situation has occurred at the facility “which was detrimental to [the residents’] health, safety and welfare.

A review of the facility’s 6:45 PM 07/25/2015 Physician Telephone Order revealed that a resident required a “venous Doppler of right lower leg […and] if not available on the weekend, then an x-ray.”

The following day on 07/26/2015, the Patient Report documented that through the Venous Doppler study it was revealed that the resident’s legs had “decreased flow and compression within these vessels. The great saphenous vein [the longest vein in the body that runs throughout the length of the lower limb] has a clot noted.” In addition, the documentation revealed, “No left leg clots are identified.”

As a result, the resident was prescribed through a 07/26/2015 Physician Telephone Order the blood thinning Xarelto medication to be given 21 days at one dosage and then increased at the completion of the 21 days. The surveyor noted that the physician’s orders were transferred directly into the resident’s MAR (Medication Administration Record).

However, a review of the August 2015 MAR (Medication Administration Record) revealed that there was listed on the MAR to be administered [per physician’s orders for the] 21 days with a stop date of 08/16/2015.” A continuing review by the state investigator revealed that the Xarelto according to the physician’s orders [was not listed on the [resident’s MAR (Medication Administration Record)] to be administered and there was no documentation of Xarelto [in the dosage prescribed by the resident’s doctor] being administered from 08/17/2015 through 08/31/2015”. The resident was not administered 15 doses.

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s September 2015 MAR (Medication Administration Record) that revealed that “the Xarelto 20 milligrams was not listed on the MAR to be administered until 09/11/2015.” A further review of the resident’s records indicated that the resident missed an additional 10 doses of the blood clot prescription medication Xarelto.

The 09/10/2015 Facility Investigation documentation revealed that the resident did not receive Xarelto medication because it was left off the MAR (Medication Administration Record). A review of the facility’s 09/10/2015 Medication Error Investigation “revealed the facility had not utilized the data from the investigation to address or to use the data to formulate strategies to prevent transcription errors and medication errors until [3 days later] on 09/13/2015.

The state investigators concluded that the “facility failed to ensure systems and processes were followed to prevent medication errors during transcriptions of the Physician Telephone Order’s and during the monthly recap process which resulted in the medication error and 25 missed doses of Xarelto which placed [the health and well-being of the resident] in Immediate Jeopardy.”

Our Ooltewah nursing home neglect attorneys recognize a failing to follow procedures and protocols at a professional level could cause dangerous medication errors that could jeopardize the health and well-being of the resident. The deficient practices by the nursing staff at Life Care Center of Ooltewah might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow the facility’s policy title: Maintenance-Nursing that reads in part:

“No orders should be written on telephone order slips in order to allow for a copy to be routed for processing. Monthly Recaps: Staff will input all current telephone orders that have not been inputted into the computer. A licensed nurse reviews and updates the orders, MAR (Medication Administration Record) and TAR (Treatment Administration Record). It is important to review all three documents together to ensure accuracy.”

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The BRIDGE AT SOUTH PITTSBURG
201 East 10th Street
South Pittsburg, Tennessee 37380
(423) 837-7981

A “For-Profit” 165-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce Policies That Prevent Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents at the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/08/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “implement the abuse policy for [a resident at the facility].”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after a review of a resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) that revealed the resident’s Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) score was 5, which indicated the resident has “impaired cognitive ability.”

The 03/02/2015 Facility Investigation signed by a Certified Nursing Assistant at the facility revealed that on that day the CNA had originally gone into the resident’s room with another resident at 7:30 PM. However, when entering the resident’s room at 9:28 PM to give the resident “a clean comforter and [the resident] stated [their] arm was hurting because [the resident had been beaten by the CNA].” The Certified Nursing Assistant gave the resident the blanket immediately and then “told the nurse what was stated.”

The Licensed Practical Nurse documented the incident in the 03/02/2015 Facility Investigation Report revealing that the Certified Nursing Assistant “approached me and told me that [the resident] was hurting and that the resident told the CNA not to hit [the resident] again.”

The facility investigation dated 03/03/2015 was signed by the facility’s Director of Nursing who noted that “This morning I received notice that [the resident] stated the Certified Nursing Assistant had beaten (the resident) up. I reported this to the Administrator.”

However, during a 4:28 PM 04/07/2015 interview with the Director of Nursing it was revealed that the Director “was not immediately notified of the resident’s allegations and confirm the facility failed to implement the abuse policy for [that resident].”

Our South Pittsburg nursing home neglect attorneys recognize failed to follow protocols and procedures to ensure residents are safeguarded against abuse, mistreatment or negligence could place the health and well-being of the resident in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at The Bridge at South Pittsburg might be considered abuse or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow the facility’s March 2013 policy titled: Abuse Neglect and Misappropriation that reads in part:

“All allegations of abuse are reported immediately to the Charge Nurse [… who] will immediately notify the Administrator, Director of Nursing.”

LAURELBROOK SANITARIUM
114 Campus Drive
Dayton, Tennessee 37321
(423) 775-0771

A “Not for Profit” 50-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide the Correct Application of Restraints According to Nursing Home Laws, Rules and Regulations

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/12/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure the safe application of restraints.”

The deficient practice was noted by state surveyor conducted 11:25 AM 08/10/2015 observation in the facility’s Assist Dining Room that revealed a resident was “seated in a wheelchair with a pelvic restraint in place and the four straps of the restraint were wrapped around the kick spurs of the wheelchair several times. Continued observation revealed two straps were under the seat of the wheelchair and none of the straps were between the seat and the sides of the wheelchair.”

The surveyor then conducted an interview a few minutes later at 11:27 AM with the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) in the Assist Dining Room. The observation revealed that the LPN “removed two straps tied into knots around the kick spurs of the wheelchair and two straps tied in one knot around the kick spurs.”

Further observation revealed that “two straps were located in the seat of the wheelchair and none of the straps were between the seat and the sides of the wheelchair.” During the interview, the Licensed Practical Nurse “confirm the pelvic restraint was not applied correctly […and] the restraint was not applied with quick release ties.” The Licensed Practical Nurse indicated that they “were unsure how to apply the restraint.”

A few minutes later, the investigator interviewed and observed the facility’s Assistant Director of Nursing who assisted in removing the straps of the restraint. During the interview, the Assistant Director of Nursing “confirm the pelvic restraint was not applied correctly, is not secured with quick release ties and was unsure how to apply the restraint correctly.”

During an interview later that day at 12:05 PM, the Administrator of the facility “confirm the facility failed to apply three resident’s pelvic restraints according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.”

Our Dayton Tennessee nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow procedures and protocols in the use of restraints could jeopardize the health and well-being of the resident. The deficient practice by the nursing staff that Laurelbrook Sanitarium might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow the facility’s policy titled: Restraint Policy that reads in part:

“Physical restraint shall be applied in such a manner that they can be speedily removing in case of a fire or other emergency.”

The Common Kinds of Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect

There are five specific kinds of abuse and neglect occurring in nursing facilities all throughout Tennessee that include:

  • Physical Abuse – This is typically described as a physical force against a nursing home resident that might involve inappropriate touching, kicking, shoving, slapping, hitting or other physical trauma. However, physical abuse can also include the use of physical restraints to restrict movement of the resident or chemical restraint that often drugs the elderly individual to minimize their capacity to do nearly anything.
  • Emotional/Mental Abuse – Nearly all other types of abuse not involving physical activity is considered emotional abuse. This can include fear, mental anguish, isolation, intimidation, humiliation or any other activity that generates emotional pain. This often includes making threats, name-calling, disrespectful comments, insults, coerced isolation or using the “silent treatment” against the resident.
  • Sexual Assault – While rape is considered the most heinous kind of sexual abuse, it is not the only one. Many victims of sexual assault have endured unwanted or inappropriate sexual behavior including nonconsensual touching, forcing the resident to view explicit pornographic images, taking inappropriate photographs or witnessing the sexual exhibition of others.
  • Negligence – Any failure by the resident’s caregiver to ensure that the elderly individual’s physical, emotional, social or medical needs are met can be considered negligence. The act of negligence against the resident can be either intentional or unintentional. In some cases, a lack of training or supervision might lead to negligence such as a member of the staff failing to follow procedures and protocols that lead to the injury, harm or death of the resident.
  • Financial Exploitation – The personal belongings and funds of residents who are under the care of the nursing facility and caregivers must be protected at all times. Any individual who deceives the elder or improperly utilizing their finances or property without authorization (like a power of attorney authorization) that the frauds the senior in any way could be considered financial abuse. This may or may not include investment, scams, coerced property transfers, forgery, or using the elderly’s funds to make purchases.

Recognizing the common types of nursing home abuse and neglect is the simplest way to serve as your loved one’s advocate and take a proactive approach to ensure their health, safety and well-being. In many incidences, family members will choose to hire a personal injury attorney who specializes in nursing home abuse cases to represent their loved one. An attorney can take immediate action to stop the abuse and neglect and provide a variety of legal options to seek recompense against every individual that caused your loved one harm.

Hiring Legal Representation

Elderly individuals will often remain silent for days, months or even years about their abuse, mistreatment or neglect. This is often out of self-blame, fear or in an effort to protect the abuser. If you suspect a loved one has been injured or harmed by the nursing staff, employees, other residents, family members or friends, it is necessary to take immediate legal action. The Chattanooga nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC remain passionate in standing up for their clients who are often the community’s most vulnerable members. Our team of dedicated Tennessee elder abuse lawyers can assist you and your family when filing a claim for financial compensation and to obtain justice against every individual or entity that caused your loved one harm. Having a skilled, dedicated and trusted lawyer on your side can assure your family of a successful outcome to the claim or lawsuit.

We encourage you to contact our law offices today by calling (888) 424-5757 to schedule your free no obligation, full case review. We handle all wrongful death lawsuits, personal injury claims and nursing home neglect cases through contingency fee agreements. This means all of your legal services are provided immediately without the need of paying any upfront fee. The information you share with our law offices remains confidential.

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For additional information on Tennessee laws and information on nursing homes look here.

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

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