New Government Report Demonstrates Alarming Number Of Criminals Caring For Elderly In Nursing Homes

I had to do a double-take when I saw some nursing home staffing statistics referenced in a report released by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG).  An alarming 92% of nursing homes across the country have at least one criminal– in one form or another– working at the facility.

Alarming Number Of Criminals Caring For Elderly In Nursing HomesIn calculating this disturbing statistic, 260 nursing homes were randomly selected from the almost 16,000 nursing homes that receive Medicare funding.  Lists of current employees were then compared with data from FBI criminal records.

The study defined a criminal as an employee with a conviction for an assortment of criminal activities such as: crimes against property (theft), drug-related convictions, motor vehicle theft and crimes against others.

Aside from banning the hiring of employees with convictions relating to the, abuse, neglect or mistreating of residents, further hiring restrictions are left to the individual states. Currently, there is little uniformity in conducting background checks for new hires.

Only 10 states utilize FBI background screening, 33 states require a statewide criminal background check and eight states have no regulation regarding criminal background checks– Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming.

As if the general tone of the report is not alarming enough, the study didn’t even take into consideration contract employees provided by staffing companies or employees working in similar facilities such as hospice or assisted living facilities.

Certainly, the lack of staffing requirements need to be addressed by congress as we repeatedly see the true problems that accompany these lack of regulations to be the elderly men and women who are frequently at the mercy of these criminals behind the closed doors of their facilities.

For additional information view our North Dakota nursing home law page.

Related:

CNA Facing Battery Charges After Co-Worker Reports Abuse To Authorities

Guilty Plea From Nurse Accused Of Abusing Tennessee Nursing Home Resident

Nursing Home Employee Charged With Battery After A Patient Asks For Assistance With Bathing

Administrator Charged With Elder Abuse After Intentionally Over-Medicating Nursing Home Patients

Feds: 92% of Nursing Homes Staffed By Criminals Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, March 3, 2011

Updated:

One response to “New Government Report Demonstrates Alarming Number Of Criminals Caring For Elderly In Nursing Homes”

  1. Cheryl Rayer, RN says:

    The fact that here in North Dakota we do not have a mandatory background check process for persons applying for work with some of our most vulnerable citizens is unnerving to say the least. I have worked in the Home Care Services Industry for 32 years and for the past 10-15 years, we have been required to perform background checks on all persons applying for positions within the Home Care setting. Do we not owe our senior citizens at least safe care?
    Thank you for this opportunity to submit a comment. Cheryl Rayer, RN

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