Columbia Maryland Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Columbia Nursing Home Abuse LawyersAs individuals grow older, many have no other choice than to relocate into a nursing facility to receive compassionate health and hygiene care during the later stages of life. Unfortunately, evidence has revealed that nearly half of all nursing homes in the U.S. lack proper staffing and nearly one out of every three employees at these homes have been caught neglecting or abusing residents. In fact, the Columbia nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have seen a significant rise in the number of civil cases involving mistreatment throughout Anne Arundel and Howard counties.

Almost 315,000 individuals live within the borders of Howard County and nearly twice that in the surrounding communities located in Anne Arundel and Montgomery counties. Out of the heavily populated area, almost one out of every seven residents are 65 years and older. The significant rise in the number of elderly individuals in the area between Washington DC and Baltimore has placed an overwhelming demand on the number of nursing home beds in facilities throughout central Maryland. As a result, many nursing home have become overcrowded and lacking the staff needed to provide every resident quality care.

Columbia Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

Our Maryland elder abuse law firm understands the sensitivity involved in handling cases of nursing home neglect and abuse. Our team of dedicated nursing home lawyers has long served as advocates for the elderly. We continuously review and evaluate opened investigations, health concerns and filed complaints involving nursing facilities statewide. We publish this information gathered from various publicly available sources, including Medicare.gov, in an effort to assist families who are faced with the undesirable prospect of placing a loved one in the hands of professional caregivers.

Comparing Columbia Area Nursing Homes

Our team of Howard County nursing home negligence attorneys post the detailed list below outlining all of the nursing facilities in the Columbia area currently maintaining below average ratings as compared to other homes nationwide. In addition, our law firm has published our primary concerns and detailed the facilities with significant issues, including unsanitary conditions, accident hazards and cases of abuse and neglect that caused actual harm to residents.

Information on Maryland Nursing Home Abuse & Negligence Lawsuits

Our attorneys have compiled data from settlements and jury verdicts across Maryland to give you an idea as to how cases are valued. Learn more about the cases below:

ELLICOTT CITY HEALTH and REHABILITATION CENTER
3000 North Ridge Rd.
Ellicott City, Maryland 21043
(410) 461-7577

A “For-Profit” 182-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Sufficiently Treatment and Nursing Care to Prevent the Development of an Avoidable Pressure Ulcer

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 03/25/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “implement interventions to prevent [a resident] from acquiring an avoidable pressure ulcer.” The state surveyor conducting the complaint investigation reviewed the 09/21/2014 Hospital medical records indicating that the Physical Therapist noted that the “resident required the assistance of two staff members for bed mobility.”

The state surveyor conducting the complaint investigation also noted that the health and rehabilitation center’s 09/24/2014 medical record by the Physical Therapist documented that the resident “required moderate to maximum assistance (50 percent to 75 percent assist for bed mobility [including] rolling side to side.” The investigator also reviewed the resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) dated 09/30/2014 revealing “that the resident was at risk for developing pressure ulcers.”

Investigation concluded that the facility staff developed a 10/01/2014 care plan due to the resident’s self-care performance deficit in performing activities of daily living caused by limited mobility related to their medical condition. The care plan included interventions that required “staff participation to reposition and turn the resident in bed.”

However, the resident’s TAR (Treatment Administration Record) “reveal that there is no documented evidence that the facility staff implemented interventions to relieve pressure from bony prominence as when the resident was in bed or sitting in a wheelchair.”

On 10/03/2014 a nurse at the facility completed a concurrent review revealing the resident had a pressure ulcer with “a depth of the wound at 0.1 centimeters. The physician was notified and gave a telephone order to have the resident assessed by the Wound Nurse secondary to the sacral pressure ulcer.”

However, the state investigator indicated that the facility “failed to revise the resident’s Care Plan related to the development of a sacral pressure ulcer. Also, the facility failed to implement interventions for pressure relief to the resident’s bony prominences even after the resident developed a pressure ulcer on 10/03/2014.”

Just five days later, on 10/08/2014, the medical record indicated that “the resident’s sacral pressure ulcer [now] measured 5.0 centimeters by 3.8 centimeters and was unstageable. [An unstageable pressure ulcer indicates devitalized tissue (eschar).” The following week on 10/14/2015, the resident “was seen by an orthopedic physician for follow-up evaluation of [their bedsore].” Recommendations by the physician included “needs aggressive care of sacral [decubitus ulcer].” The following day, the resident was evaluated by the facility’s wound care physician who documented that “the resident is turned and positioned every two hours with positioning in place. The nurse further documented the teaching was done with the resident regarding the importance of turning and repositioning. The resident verbalized understanding but voiced a concern that was not easy to move in bed due to the softness of the specialty mattress. The physician gave a new order on 10/15/2014 for a gel cushion to the resident’s wheelchair.”

Our Ellicott city nursing home neglect attorneys recognizes failing to provide sufficient treatment and nursing care to prevent the development of an avoidable pressure ulcer could cause direct harm and injury to the resident. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Ellicott city health and rehabilitation Center might be considered mistreatment or neglect because they failed to follow the established protocols and procedures involving bedsores.

MANORCARE HEALTH SERVICES – WOODBRIDGE VALLEY
1525 North Rolling Road
Catonsville, Maryland 21228
(410) 719-1240

A “For-Profit” 120-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Identify the Correct Resident Before Inserting IV Line into the Wrong Resident

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 11/13/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “identify the correct resident before inserting and establishing an intravenous line.” The state investigator handling the complaint investigation reviewed records at the facility revealing “an allegation that [a resident] incorrectly received an intravenous line (IV) on 10/12/2015.”

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s medical records revealing through a 10/12/2015 Nurse’s Note that the resident “had an IV started during the evening (3 PM-11 PM) shift on 10/12/2015 when there was no physician order [to do so].” The Nurse’s Notes from that evening indicate “the IV was removed from [the resident] during the same evening shift.”

The complaint investigation was opened in part because the facility investigation “reveal that [the resident] received an IV that was to be inserted in [their] roommate.” The state investigator noted that “the facility nursing staff must take steps to correctly identify the right resident before starting an IV on any resident.”

Our Catonsville nursing home neglect attorneys recognizes failing to follow protocols to identify the correct resident before providing any medical care or treatment could cause the resident harm or injury. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at ManorCare Health Services – Woodbridge Valley might be considered mistreatment or negligence because it did not follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility.

CATONSVILLE COMMONS
16 Fusting Avenue
Catonsville, Maryland 21228
(410) 747-1800

A “For-Profit” 136-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Report and Investigate Any Act or Report of Abuse, Mistreatment or Neglect of Residents in the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/22/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “report allegations of abuse to the Administrator, the State Agency and [a failure] to initiate an investigation in a timely manner.”

The state surveyor handling the complaint investigation reviewed a resident’s 04/21/2015 clinical record that revealed “the resident was assessed by the facility through a Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) assessment that revealed the resident scored 6 out of 15 on 12/13/2014 (where a score between 0-7 indicates “severe cognitive impairment.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after an incident noted in the resident’s 02/18/2015 clinical records where a nurse at the facility “wrote a note at 4:57 PM that the resident was found in the elevator with [their] jacket caught on fire, which was put out and not burnt.” The facility assessed the resident’s skin and took away the jacket from the resident. The resident “still went outside and lighted another cigarette and smoked without the jacket on. [An unidentified staff member brought the resident “back in but [the resident] refuse to go into [the resident’s] room.”

A notation at 3:06 PM on 04/21/2015 by a nurse interviewed by the state surveyor indicated “that there was a fire reported to her by someone, but the identity was not documented, who found the resident’s clothes were on fire and the nurse denied remembering who reported the fire to her. [The nurse that made a report] completed the smoking assessment on 02/18/2015 at 4:24 PM, but he did not indicate that the matter was reported to the Administrator or Director of Nursing.” In addition, the nurse would not or could not provide “a reason for these failures. She said she consider the incident to be hearsay because someone else put out the fire and then reported it to her.”

The state investigator conducted an interview with the Director of Nursing on 04/21/2015 who confirmed “an investigation was not done nor was he aware of the incident prior to be notified by the survey team.”

The state investigator reviewed the “reporting nurse’s” personnel history that revealed “that she was disciplined on 11/07/2014, because the employee failed to complete an investigation thoroughly and timely on a resident injury. Resident injured on 10/23/2014, and as of 10/28/2014 investigation had not been completed.”

Our Catonsville nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that any failure to investigate or report any incident of abuse or alleged abuse could potentially cause every resident in the facility harm or injury. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Catonsville Commons directly violates federal and state nursing home regulations and might be considered additional abuse, mistreatment or neglect.

FOREST HAVEN NURSING HOME
701 Edmondson Avenue
Catonsville, Maryland 21228
(410) 747-7425

A “For-Profit” 167-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent an Avoidable Accident from Occurring

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 11/13/2014, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “provide adequate supervision in the shower room to prevent a fall which resulted in the resident sustaining a fractured nose requiring stitches and the administration of narcotic pain medication.”

The deficient practice was noted after review of a resident’s observation by the state surveyor on 11/06/2014 at 12:08 PM “to have an old bruising on the face below both eyes and an abrasion on the bridge of the nose.” The state investigator noted that the resident’s first initiated February 2014 care plan for Risk for Falls/injuries related to wandering, unsteady gait and poor safety awareness.”

State investigator review the resident’s care plan for 05/25/2014 noting that “the resident lost balance in the dining room and found on the floor.” Again on 09/12/2014 it was noted that the resident was “on floor beside bed, skin tear to the bridge of the nose.” This was followed by a 10/11/2014 notation that the “resident found on the floor in the hallway, skin discoloration to the left side of the cheekbone”. Finally, on 10/22/2014, it was noted that the “resident observed on the floor in a sitting position at bedside.”

The state surveyor reviewed the resident’s 10/06/2014 MDS (Minimum Data Set) revealing “that the resident required limited assistance (resident highly involved in activity; staff provide guided maneuvering of limbs and other non-weight-bearing assistance) of one person for transferring and walking in the room or quarter.”

The same MDS (Minimum Data Set) indicated “that for bathing the resident was totally dependent requiring one person physical assist and that in regard to balancing during transitions and walking the resident was not stable, but able to stabilize without assistance.” The state surveyor asked if a Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) analysis could be conducted. The Staff Replied “No [because the] resident rarely/never understood.”

The state surveyor recognizes the resident’s medical record revealed “that several physical therapy screens were completed […and] the resident has a decline in functionality needs increasing assistance for transfers and the gate is very unstable […and] rehab is working with [the resident] to improve dynamic balance in order to improve stability and standing and walking.”

On 10/27/2014 at 9:05 AM, the facility’s Nursing Notes revealed that “the resident was ambulated (walked) into the shower with the Geriatric Nursing Assistant (GNA) who reported turning around to turn the water on and the resident was heard falling to the floor. This resulted in a discoloration of both knees, laceration (cut) to the forehead and across the bridge of the nose.” The facility’s “physician was contacted and order was obtained to send the resident to the hospital for evaluation.” The state surveyor then asked if the Geriatric Nursing Assistant providing the resident care on that day “would be working later in the week “the GNA had been terminated.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing and Administrator in regards to the fall involving the resident on 10/27/2014. The surveyor noted that the resident’s records indicated “the resident was a fall risk with an unsteady gait that had been assessed by [occupational and physical therapy] for this issue; and no information was found in the current fall Care Plan addressing safety measures during bathing for this resident.” The facility’s Director of Nursing “reported that staff education did not occur after the incident.”

By 11/12/2014, “the facility provided evidence that the GNA and nursing staff had received an in-service: on Showering an ambulatory Resident [occurring between 10/28/2014 and 11/01/2014.” The training involved specific reminiscences including “letting a resident to the shower room, the resident must be safely seated either in the shower chair or on the shower bench prior to performing any preparation (e.g. turning the water on, ensuring proper water temperature, etc.) needed in the shower room.”

Our Catonsville nursing home neglect lawyers recognize the failing state proper precautions to prevent an avoidable accident from occurring has the potential of causing the resident additional harm or serious injury. The deficient practice of the Administrator, Director of Nursing and nursing staff at Forest Haven Nursing Home might be considered negligence or mistreatment of the resident because it caused the resident significant injuries on numerous occasions.

FAIRLAND CENTER
2101 Fairland Road
Silver Spring, Maryland 20904
(301) 384-6161

A “For-Profit” 92-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure the Safety of the Resident during a Transfer from the Bed to the Wheelchair That Led to a Fracture of the Lower Left Leg

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/07/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure resident safety during a transfer from the bed to a chair by securing the bed and or wheelchair from movement prior to the transfer.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state surveyor conducted a review of a resident’s 10/28/2015 clinical record revealing the resident “was transferred to the hospital due to a fracture to the lower left leg.” The state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s 10/27/2014 10:45 PM nurse’s notes revealing that a resident “complained of left leg pain and upon assessment [the patient] stated she was assisted to a fall, had denied injury, but later started complaining of pain.” The facility’s Nurse Practitioner was “made aware, assessed the patient and gave an order for an x-ray of [the left hip, left knee, left ankle and left foot].”

The state investigator reviewed the 10/20/2015 5:03 AM nurse’s notes indicating that the results of the x-ray revealed “left knee: acute fracture of fibular [one of the bones in the lower leg]. Left ankle: soft tissue swelling, discoloration.” As a result, the facility’s “physician was notified and the resident was transferred to the hospital at 4:35 AM.”

The state investigator reviewed the 1027 2014 11:03 PM review of the resident’s Change of Condition nurse’s notes stating “to the resident had an incident/accident/fall in the past 72 hours [and was] transferring to a [wheelchair].” The resident’s hospital history and physical revealed that the facility nurse stated “yesterday around [noon] when they were trying to transfer the [resident] from the bed to the wheelchair, her bed moved back, so she fell on her knee.” By 4:45 PM that day, “the resident complained of left knee pain reported that during the 7 to 3 shift she was lowered on the floor while being transferred to the wheelchair.” Afterwards, the Licensed Practical Nurse providing care to the resident stated “he administered Tylenol per the resident’s orders and notified the [Nurse Practitioner at the facility].”

Our Silver Spring nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow protocols when transferring residents requiring assistance has the potential of causing an avoidable accident. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Fairland Center might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it directly affected the health and wellbeing of the resident that resulted in a fracture to the resident’s lower left leg.

PATAPSCO VALLEY CENTER
9109 Liberty Road
Randallstown, Maryland 21133
(410) 655-7373

A “For-Profit” 172-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Proper Services to Prevent Urinary Tract Infections and Restore Normal Bladder Function

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/23/2014, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “provide appropriate treatment and services to improve and/or prevent decline in normal bladder function [for a resident] reviewed for continence decline since admission.”

The deficient practice was noted by the state surveyor after a review of the resident’s Quarterly Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) indicating that the resident “was occasionally incontinent (less than seven episodes of incontinence) […and the resident] had shown to have had a decline in bladder functioning within the first 90 days of readmission to the facility.” The resident’s current MDS (Minimum Data Set) revealed the resident now “was always incontinent of urine.”

The resident’s 09/22/2014 medical record revealed that the resident now has “ongoing documented urinary incontinence. The current daily documentation indicated incontinence is more prevalent on the evening shift” with “urinary urgency and need for assistance in toileting.”

However, the state surveyor reviewed the resident’s plans of care that “did not reveal any care planning to address urinary incontinence. The 03/28/2014 assessment had shown the resident is continent of urine but previous assessments indicate the resident has occasional urinary incontinence.”

The state surveyor conducted a 12:45 PM 10/22/2014 interview with the resident that revealed “the resident did not think the staff was doing anything to address the incontinence.”

The surveyor then conducted an interview a few hours later with the facility’s Assistant Director of Nursing who reviewed the medical record “and confirmed that there were not any plans of care addressing the resident urinary incontinence or any other documented evidence of the facility addressing the resident’s assessed decline in the ability to maintain urinary continence.

Our Randallstown nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to provide proper services and care to help residents restore normal bladder function could cause a significant decline in their health and well-being. The deficient practice of the nursing staff that Patapsco Valley Center might be considered negligence or mistreatment especially when the bladder function of the resident is allowed to decline without intervention or the development of additional care planning.

TRANSITIONS HEALTHCARE AT SYKESVILLE
7309 Second Avenue
Sykesville, Maryland 21784
(410) 795-1100

A “For-Profit” 118-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols That Investigate, Control or Maintain Infection from Spreading throughout the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/02/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “maintain a sanitary environment to prevent the development and transmission of disease causing organisms by not repairing and/or replacing torn vinyl on wheelchair armrests which expose the underneath padding, making it difficult to properly clean and disinfect the armrests” and for the nursing staff “not changing gloves before touching resident equipment.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after the state surveyor made numerous observations between 03/31/2015 and 04/01/2015 of “residents sitting in wheelchairs with torn vinyl on wheelchair armrests, exposing the underneath padding. Due to the tears in the vinyl, the armrests cannot be disinfected and cleaned properly to prevent the spread of microorganisms.”

In addition, the state surveyor noted additional observations occurring at 8:45 AM on 04/02/2015 of a GNA (Geriatric Nursing Assistant) providing personal care to a resident. The Geriatric Nursing Assistant “observed with soiled plastic gloves on after giving [the resident] a bed bath. As the nurse walked into the room to give [the resident] morning medications, [the GNA] with the soil gloves, touch the wheelchair handles to move the wheelchair […and] then proceeded to walk over to the sink and change the gloves.”

Our Sykesville nursing home neglect lawyers recognize the failing to follow procedures and protocols to help control or maintain infection from spreading throughout the facility has the potential of harming every resident in Transitions Healthcare at Sykesville. In addition, the deficient practice of the nursing staff at the facility might be considered mistreatment or negligence because it fails to follow the established policies enforced by state and federal nursing home regulators.

NMS HEALTHCARE OF SPRINGBROOK
12325 New Hampshire Avenue
Silver Spring, Maryland 20904
(301) 622-4600

A “For-Profit” 99-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores from Developing or to Allow Existing Bedsores to Heal

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/07/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “provide treatment for [4 residents at the facility].” The state surveyor conducting a review of failures noted that the findings that were identified during the investigation were valid.

A complaint investigation was initiated after a conflict between physician’s orders and the treatment provided to the resident by the nursing staff. The state surveyor noted that on 08/27/2015, “the physician conducted his wound assessment and documented that [the resident] had multiple areas of necrosis (dead tissue) on his right lower extremity.” Additionally, the resident was noted to have a “stage III pressure ulcer [measuring] 1.7 centimeters by 1.7 centimeters by 0.3 centimeters with 100% granulation tissue (health tissue) noted on the [resident’s] right heel.” The physician gave the Unit Manager and Wound Nurse verbal orders on 08/27/2015 “to cleanse the stage III pressure ulcer with normal saline solution (NSS), apply Arglase powder to the wound bed, and cover with gauze daily.”

However, the state surveyor conducted an investigation on the file complaint reviewed the resident’s 08/27/2015 and 09/02/2015 TARs (Treatment Administration Records) revealing that “the nursing staff signed off to the right heel was cleanse daily with NSS (normal sailing), pat dry, apply skin prep, open to air instead. Based on manufacturer’s instruction, skin prep should not be applied directly to the open wound.”

The physician then conducted an assessment of the resident’s wound on 09/03/2015 noting that the resident’s “right heel pressure ulcer was [now] 2.0 centimeters by 1.5 centimeters by unstageable due to 100 percent black necrotic tissue. He again gave a verbal order to cleanse the right heel pressure ulcer with NSS, apply Arglase powder to the wound bed and cover with gauze.”

Once again, the surveyor reviewed the resident’s 09/30/2015 3:00 PM TAR (Treatment Administration Record) revealing “that she signed off that she cleansed [the resident’s] right heel pressure ulcer during day shift on 09/04/2015 with NSS, apply skin prep and left it open.”

The state investigator conducted two interviews, one on 10/01/2015 and again on 10/08/2015 with the resident’s primary physician/wound specialist who revealed that “he conducted his skin assessments at the bedside in the verbal orders to the nursing staff at the same time. He expected the nursing staff to carry out his verbal orders of wound treatment on the following day.”

Our Silver Spring nursing home neglect lawyers recognize that nursing staff failing to follow physician’s orders could jeopardize the health and well-being of the resident, which could eventually lead to a serious decline in the status of an existing bedsore. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at NMS Healthcare of Springbrook might be considered mistreatment or negligence of the resident, especially when there is a significant decline in the condition of an existing pressure ulcer.

NORTH ARUNDEL HEALTH AND REHABILITATION CENTER
313 Hospital Drive
Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061
(410) 761-1222

A “For-Profit” 129-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Immediately Notify the Resident, the Resident’s Physician and the Family Members of Any Change of the Resident Situation Including a Decline in Their Health or Injury

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/12/2014, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “notify the attending physician of invalid INR results during therapy.” The deficient practice of the nursing staff involved one resident at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after review of a resident’s records indicating that the resident was admitted to “a local hospital and stayed between 08/10/2014 and 08/13/2014 for back pain and [other medical conditions including fibrillation (quivering or irregular heartbeat)].” The resident was given blood thinning medication in an effort to treat and prevent blood clots from occurring. However, the medication “has a risk of increasing bleeding and is monitored by a blood test called a PT/INR” that has “a desirable range of 2-3 and elevated levels indicate an increased risk of bleeding.”

The state investigator noted that during a review of the resident’s 08/18/2014 medical record that the resident was required to take the medication every night and repeat the INR testing in one week.

The surveyor noted that reviewing the medical record revealed “the lab wrote for INRs obtain on 08/25/2014, 08/26/2014, 08/27/2014 at 08/28/2014 the following statement: A clotting time could not be attained on the specimen. This could be due to a prolonged [drug] time or an interfering substance. A repeat on the second specimen may be useful. A prolonged [drug] time indicates an increased risk of bleeding.”

The state surveyor reviewed the medical record belonging to the resident it was revealed that the facility’s Nurse Practitioner continued to order the identical 3.5 milligram prescription medication “to be given every night despite no valid INR results to monitor the risk of bleeding.”

The surveyor conducted a telephone interview with the facility’s physician on 09/11/2014 in charge of oversights of the actions of the Nurse Practitioner who revealed “that he was not aware that the INRs were not being obtained […and] that [the Nurse Practitioner] did not notify nor confer with him concerning the continued use of [the resident’s medication] without INR monitoring […and that the Nurse Practitioner’s] failure to notify [the physician] resulted in [the physician] not having the opportunity to assess the situation and make changes to the Plan of Care.”

Our Glen Burnie nursing home neglect attorneys recognized that any failure to notify the resident’s physician and a change of their condition or failure to notify any failure of an incomplete lab result could place the health and well-being of the resident in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at North Arundel Health and Rehabilitation Center might be considered mistreatment or negligence.

LORIEN NURSING and rehabilitation center – ELKRIDGE
7615 Washington Boulevard
Elkridge, Maryland 21075
(410) 579-2626

A “For-Profit”70 -certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Immediately Notify the Resident, the Resident’s Doctor and/or Family Members of a Change in the Resident Situation Including a Decline in Their Condition

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/20/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “properly notify the physician of a mental status change after [the resident] had experienced a fall.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after a review of the resident’s medical records noting that “the resident was found on the floor next to the bed [at 4:45 AM…and] a neurological observation she was initiated at 4:50 AM [at which time] the resident was conscious, knew his/her name and his or her/speech was clear.” The documentation noted in the neurological assessments were within normal limits between 4:50 AM and 6:35 AM. Notations indicate that “the resident’s blood pressure remained stable.”

Additionally, the resident’s neurological observation she revealed that three hours after the incident at 7:35 AM, “the nurse documented that the resident did not know his/her name and his/her speech was unclear and the resident’s blood pressure was [not normal].” The state investigator recognizes that “this represented a significant change in the resident’s mental status and blood pressure.

The state investigator conducted an interview with the GNA (Geriatric Nursing Assistant) providing care to the resident who stated “that when he/she arrived for his/her shift at approximately 7:05 AM, the GNA entered the resident’s room […and] said good morning to the resident and the resident did not respond.” The Geriatric Nursing Assistant then stated “the resident usually would respond back […and when assisting] the resident to stand the resident was unable to do so […and] that the resident had previously been able to stand up from the bed with minimal assistance.” At that time, the Geriatric Nursing Assistant indicated that they “had to use maximum assistance to transfer the resident from the bed to the chair.”

While the resident typically conversed with the GNA and ate all of their breakfast, that morning “the resident did not eat breakfast and did not talk.” The Geriatric Nursing Assistant reported the change in condition of the resident to the nurse in charge.

The state investigator reviewed the Director of Nursing Investigation statement and conducted an interview with the Director of Nursing who revealed that on that morning at 9:00 AM during clinical rounds the nurse is providing care to the resident “advise the [Director of Nursing] of the resident had fallen during the [overnight shift] and that the resident’s daughter wanted the resident sent to the hospital emergency department.” The Director of Nursing was informed that the resident “was unable to talk […and that the results of the neurological assessment revealed that the resident] did not respond.”

By “approximately 9:45 AM, which was two hours and 40 minutes after the resident had been noted with a change in his/her mental status, the physician gave in order to send the resident to the hospital emergency room for evaluation.”

Our Elkridge nursing home neglect attorneys recognizes failing to follow protocols to immediately notify the resident’s doctor of any change in his or her condition could cause significant harm or injury to the resident’s health and well-being. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Lorien Nursing and Rehabilitation Center – Elkridge might be considered negligence or mistreatment of the resident that could have led to the resident’s death.

Common Failures in Nursing Facilities

The Columbia nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC handle many cases dealing with abuse and neglect in nursing facilities. While not every incident of mistreatment is obvious, the most common cases our law firm handles involve specific types of abuse and neglect by the nursing staff that include:

  • Continually failing to properly turn the nursing home resident leading to skin breakdown
  • A failure to monitor hydration and nutrition
  • The failure to provide adequate supervision or guard against the resident falling
  • Medication errors, including administering the wrong drug or giving the right drug to the wrong resident
  • The unwarranted or unauthorized use of restraint for convenience or discipline
  • A failure to protect the resident from being verbally, mentally, physically or sexually abused by staff members or other residents

Obtaining Legal Representation

If you have any suspicion that a loved one dear to you has suffered any type of neglect or abuse while residing in a nursing facility, it is imperative to immediately obtain legal representation. To ensure your loved one is moved out from harm’s way, please contact the Maryland elder abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC. Our Howard County nursing home lawyers are dedicated to protecting the rights and dignity of nursing home residents throughout the state.

We encourage you to contact our Columbia area elder abuse law office today at (888) 424-5757 to schedule your free, no obligation full case evaluation. We accept these cases on contingency so no upfront fees are required.

For additional information on Maryland laws and information on nursing homes look here.

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

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