Baltimore Maryland Nursing Home Abuse Attorneys

Baltimore Elder Neglect LawyerChoosing to place an elderly loved one in a nursing facility is often an emotional and difficult decision. Picking the right home is typically based on the expectation that the spouse, parent or grandparent will be treated with competence and compassion in a safe, loving environment. Unfortunately, the reality of what happens in nursing homes is often much different. In fact, the Baltimore nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have seen a significant rise in abusive and neglectful behavior of nursing staff and employees working in nursing facilities throughout Maryland.

More than 620,000 individuals reside within the city limits of Baltimore and nearly triple that number live in the surrounding communities. One out of every seven residents in Maryland’s largest metropolitan area is a senior citizen and many of those reside in nursing facilities. The elderly population has risen significantly in recent years as many more seniors reach their retirement years. Because of that, nursing homes have been overwhelmed and overcrowded resulting in higher incidences of overworked nursing staff failing to meet the demands when providing care to the residents.

Baltimore Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

The substandard care provided by medical staff and nursing facilities is a serious problem all throughout Baltimore City, Herford and Baltimore counties. Many nursing home residents are victimized by those responsible to provide them care. Because of that, our Maryland elder abuse attorneys continuously review filed complaints, opened investigations and health concerns at nursing facilities throughout the state, from information gathered from publicly available sources including Medicare.gov.

Comparing Baltimore Area of Nursing Facilities

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect lawyers have posted the list below detailing facilities throughout the Baltimore area currently maintaining below average ratings as compared to other facilities in the United States. Additionally, our attorneys have added their primary concerns involving specific cases at these nursing homes that have harmed residents. Some of these concerns involve unsanitary conditions, accident hazards, facility acquired bedsores and other problems.

Information on Maryland Nursing Home Abuse & Negligence Lawsuits

Our attorneys have compiled data from settlements and jury verdicts across Maryland to give you an idea as to how cases are valued. Learn more about the cases below:

RIVERVIEW REHABILITATION and HEALTH CENTER
1 Eastern Boulevard
Baltimore, Maryland 21221
(410) 574-1400

A “For-Profit” 238-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure All Residents Receive Administered Medication as Ordered by the Physician

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/02/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “administer medication as ordered by the physician.”

The complaint investigation involved a review of the resident’s 1/21/2015 records where the resident’s physician ordered calcium dietary supplementation’s with vitamin D twice daily. The state surveyor observed a medication pass occurring on 04/01/2015 revealing that the staff nurse on duty providing care to the resident only administered the calcium supplementation noting that while the calcium “is a medication used to treat symptoms caused by too much stomach acid such as heartburn, upset stomach and does not contain vitamin D.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview at noon on 04/01/2015 with the facility’s Director of Nursing who “revealed the facility staff failed to administer medication as ordered by the physician.”

CATON MANOR
3330 Wilkens Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21229
(410) 525-1544

A “For-Profit” 140-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Report and Investigate Any Act or Report of Abuse of the Residents at the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 02/12/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “report an allegation of abuse to the Office of Health Care Quality” the Maryland Survey and Certification Agency and the facility’s failure “to report the results of an investigation for more than a month for another resident.” The deficient practice was noted after the failures became evident and involved two residents “reviewed for abuse investigations.”

A review of medical records of a resident noted that on 02/09/2015, a resident reported when asked “if he/she had seen any residents being abuse, that there had been a Geriatric Nursing Assistant (GNA) that had been rough with residents and this had been reported to staff.”

The state surveyor received a Grievance/Concern Form dated 03/07/2014 detailing a resident reporting “having observed the GNA twist, jerk and throw residents down onto the bed and also that the GNA had twisted him/her on occasion.” There were two statements “obtained by [the resident] taken on 03/05/2014 a reference to the accident [occurring on] 03/03/2014.”

A statement review “revealed the following allegations: He [the GNA] said that I am too slow and he is going to turn me and throw me into the chair. He did exactly what he said.” Additional notations were made in the report by the Social Worker who said “she was not sure if the allegations had been reported to the OHCQ or not, indicating she needed to check with the Director of Nursing and the Administrator.”

State survey conducted a 02/12/2015 interview with the facility Administrator who reported “that she did not know anything about the investigation of the above referenced abuse investigation involving [2 residents at the facility and] stated that there was nothing in the file about it […and] that she had no documentation to indicate this allegation had been reported to the OHCQ.”

Our Baltimore nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols to alert state agencies of any allegation of abuse or incident of abuse might be seen as negligence, mistreatment or additional abuse. The deficient practice by the administration and nursing staff at Caton Manor did not follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility and directly violates state and federal nursing home regulations.

KESWICK MULTI-CARE CENTER
700 West 40th Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21211
(410) 235-8860

A “Not for Profit” 242-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Proper Treatment to Ensure an Existing Bedsore Has the Potential to Heal

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/12/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “prevent the worsening of a pressure ulcer for [a resident at the facility].” This deficient practice by Keswick Multi-Care center involves a resident admitted to the facility coded with bowel incontinence rated at three indicating ‘always incontinent’ and needing help with bed mobility, transfers, toileting and personal hygiene requiring one person physical assist. Both of these risk factors increase the resident’s potential “for developing pressure ulcers.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after 05/13/2015 review of the resident’s Care Plan “to address the pressure ulcer and directed staff to reassess the overall clinical condition and risk factors if no evidence of healing in 14 days and to assess the need for debridement treatment as ordered.” At the time, the resident’s sacral wound pressure ulcers were measured at 1.5 centimeters by 2.0 centimeters on 05/18/2015. By 06/02/2015, the pressure ulcer had increased in size to 5.0 centimeters by 4.0 centimeters. Documentation indicates that by 06/03/2015 “a change of condition note reports worsening of the sacral wound and on 06/08/2015 the moon measured 6.0 by 5.0 centimeters.” By 07/01/2015 “the sacral wound measured 6.0 by 6.0 [centimeters].”

The state surveyor conducted in 08/10/2015 interview with the facility’s Wound Nurse who “failed to reveal rationale for worsening pressure ulcer.”

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow protocols and provide adequate and necessary treatment to residents with existing bedsores has the potential to cause life-threatening conditions. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Keswick Multi-Care Center does not follow the established protocols and procedures adopted by the facility and the failure by the facility might be considered neglect or mistreatment.

ELIZABETH REHABILITATION AND NURSING CENTER
3320 Benson Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21227
(410) 644-7100

A “Not for Profit” 162-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Develop an Effective Plan to Report Allegations of Abuse That Resulted in Additional Allegations of Abuse to Go Unreported.

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 11/13/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “to ensure that effective QA (Quality Assessment and Assurance Performance Improvement) activities were implemented at the last annual recertification survey, to address the facility’s failure to report allegations of abuse.”

The state surveyor noted that the survey performed by the state agency at the facility in the previous year “revealed that the facility was cited for failure to report abuse and that the facility developed a plan of correction to address the deficient practice.”

The deficient practice was noted after review at the facility for allegations and incidences of abuse where it was determined “that the facility Administrator failed to report to the state agency that a resident made an allegation of being handle roughly by staff, and that a GNA (Geriatric Nursing Assistant) failed to immediately report that a family member threatened to kill another resident.”

The state surveyor conducted in 11/13/2015 interview with the facility’s Assistant Director of Nursing/Quality Assurance coordinator who “was asked what QA interventions were put into place after the deficiency and reporting abuse was identified during the facility’s last recertification survey.” In response, the Assistant Director of Nursing/Quality Assurance Coordinator “revealed that education was completed for all staff on elder abuse policy, reporting and investigation, and that social work conducted audits and reported to the QA committee.” However, the state surveyor recognize that the QA committee’s plan of action never corrected deficient practice at the facility because there were additional failures “to report allegations of abuse.”

Our Baltimore nursing home abuse lawyers recognize in any failure to establish, develop, implement and enforce a plan of action to report and investigate incidences of alleged abuse could potentially cause harm to every resident in the facility. The deficient practice of the administration, assurance group and nursing staff might be considered negligence or mistreatment of residents at Saint Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center.

FUTURE CARE COLD SPRING
4700 Harford Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21214
(410) 254-3300

A “For-Profit” 137-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Physician’s Orders and Providing the Resident Blood Sugar Medication That Resulted in Incident Where Resuscitation Efforts (CPR) Were Necessary

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/11/2014, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “recognize and follow a written physician order.”

The state surveyor conducted a review of a resident’s admission records indicating “the physician order blood sugar levels to be obtained at 6:30 AM, 11:30 AM, 5:00 PM, and 9:00 PM.” Depending on the results of the testing of the resident’s blood sugar levels, the nursing staff was directed to administer Humalog insulin (the short acting insulin) to ensure that the resident maintained normal blood sugar levels. In the event that the resident’s blood sugar level drop below 60 or raised higher than 400 “the physician was to be called.”

The deficient practice was noted after a review of the resident’s 6:30 AM 05/13/2014 notation in the resident’s records that indicated their “blood sugar was noted at 53 and [the resident] without signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. The physician was not notified and the staff followed the low blood sugar protocol and repeated the blood sugar and obtained a result of 66.” The following day at 6:30 AM the resident’s blood sugar test results indicated a level of “36, unable to swallow crackers or liquids and the physician was called and ordered [an injection of medication which is] given by an injection to increase the blood sugar level. The resident’s blood sugar increase to 74.”

At 11:30 AM on the same day, the resident’s blood sugar level was noted as 256. That day, the facility’s Nurse Practitioner notes in the Progress Note report indicates that the resident “was having blood sugar fluctuations in drowsiness and that the resident liked to sleep all day [noting that the resident’s] appetite was fair.” The Nurse Practitioner changed the medication order that day indicating that the injection would be moved “from every evening to every morning.”

The state surveyor conducted in 08/09/2014 interview with the facility’s Nurse Practitioner who stated that the “order change was to prevent the low morning blood sugars and decrease drowsiness.

However, five days later (05/14/2014) at 5:00 PM the resident “was found on the floor in the room. Resident stated they had fallen from their wheelchair no injuries were noted. The blood sugar was noted at 5:00 PM on 05/14/2014 to be 99 and at 9:00 PM to be 98.

By 9:00 PM that evening, the resident was given their medication. However, the nurse practitioner’s “order to change the time to morning from evening had not been recognized by the nursing staff and not placed in the Medication Administration Record.

The state surveyor conducted in 09/09/2014 8:20 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who confirmed the resident’s medication “change ordered had not been followed by the facility nursing staff.”

The resident was found unresponsive with the blood sugar level of 20 at 5:00 AM on 05/15/2014.” The nursing staff gave the resident their medication injection and initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The nursing staff called 911 at 5:03 AM with the paramedics arriving six minutes later at 5:09 AM. “Paramedics ceased resuscitation efforts on [the resident] at 5:34 AM.” The facility nursing staff’s “failure to recognize and follow the written [medication] time change order put [the resident] at risk for dangerously low blood sugar and unresponsiveness.”

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect lawyers recognize the failing to follow physician’s orders and providing insulin medication could place the health and well-being of the resident in immediate jeopardy. The deficient practice of nursing staff at Future Care Cold Spring might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it does not follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility.

NORTHWEST NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER
4601 Pall Mall Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21215
(410) 664-5551

A “For-Profit” 91-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Resident to Resident Abuse

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 03/20/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “provide adequate supervision of [a resident] to maintain the safety of other residents in the facility.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after “a dietary aide witnessed the resident striking [another resident on 09/18/2014 at 7:30 PM]. The incident report stated [the resident] wandered into [another resident’s] room and began rummaging.”

The state investigator noted that the facility staff “failed to document the incident and assessments of both residents and any plans for addressing the behaviors. [The alleged perpetrator] initially denied striking [the other resident] but later admitted to the police. It incident report was completed on 09/19/2014.”

The facility’s 09/24/2014 7:17 AM Progress Note reports that the resident “reported to the social work in Assistant Director of Nursing that [the alleged perpetrator] her/him on the left jaw while in the courtyard. [The assaulting resident] denied striking this resident.”

The facility’s Social Worker wrote a note at 9:50 AM on 09/26/2014 reporting that “the resident was given a behavioral contract on 09/18/2014 and informed violation of any other facility policies would result in the issuance of a Notice of Proposed Involuntary Discharge or Transfer (30 day notice).”

In a separate incident noted in the facility’s 02/02/2015 7:20 PM Progress Note indicates that a Registered Nurse at the facility witnessed a resident “grabbing [another resident] around the neck, attempting to choke him/her. The incident occurred in the dining room […and] the facility investigation notes the residents were advised to stay away from one another.”

The facility’s 02/27/2015 Progress Note “documented the resident’s displayed manipulative behavior, especially with residents who are cognitively impaired and admitted to initiating altercations.

Five days later at 10:02 PM on 03/02/2015, a Registered Nurse on duty that night documented through observation that they witnessed a resident “striking [another resident] on the face during a smoke break. The police were called and again the residents were advised to stay away from one another.”

The next day at 5:08 PM, the facility’s Social Worker noted that the “facility issued a 30 day discharge notice to [the abusive resident]. Following the meeting, the resident and Director of Nursing engaged in a verbal altercation. The resident reportedly arose from his/her wheelchair and attempted to strike the Director of Nursing.”

The state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s medical record documentation and noted that the resident received a 03/03/2015 Notice of Proposed Involuntary Discharge or Transfer with the reason for discharge and issuing the notice as “the safety of individuals in the facility is endangered by your continued stay.”

The state investigator indicated that “further review failed to reveal ongoing evaluations and treatment interventions to include level of supervision needed to decrease the risk of assault with other residents and staff.”

Our Baltimore nursing home abuse lawyers recognize the failing to provide an environment free of resident to resident abuse increases the potential of innocent victims suffering serious harm or injury. The failures of the administration and nursing staff to perform ongoing evaluations and treatment interventions including increasing the level supervision caused other residents harm when one resident acted aggressively toward others. The deficient practice of the facility might be considered additional abuse, mistreatment or neglect.

BRIDGEPARK HEALTHCARE CENTER – Formally LIBERTY HEIGHTS
4017 Liberty Heights Ave.
Baltimore, Maryland 21207
(410) 542-5306

A “For-Profit” 106-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Narcotic Pain Medication As Ordered by the Resident’s Physician to Treat a Severe Level of Pain after Back Surgery

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/11/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “administer medication to the resident as ordered for pain management.” This failure of the facility involved one resident who was admitted after a “hospital stay from 02/17/2015 to 02/20/2015.”

A resident had undergone surgery on 02/17/2015 “to decompress and fuse the third lumbar disc through the first sacral disc in an attempt to treat severe spinal stenosis. The surgery was done because the resident had complained of increased lower back and leg pain as well as some bowel and bladder dysfunction.” The resident was prescribed a postsurgical pain or a narcotic that was to be continued “until discharge from the hospital. The resident did not feel confident going home and recommendations for pain management and physical and occupational therapy at a subacute facility.”

The resident was admitted to Bridge Park Health Care Center at 9 PM on 02/20/2015 noting that the facility was to continue the same pain medication orders by the hospital physician. 40 minutes later, the resident was assessed with the pain level at 8 out of 10, nearly 12 hours later at 8:00 AM the following day, notations were made in the Control Drug Receipt/Record/Disposition Form that the resident’s “pain was 8/10. There was a delayed administration of pain medication as ordered.” Four hours later at 12:15 PM notations made in the facility’s progress notes indicates that “the resident’s family told the nurse that [the resident] needed pain medication. The resident’s pain was assessed to be 6 out of 10.” The notes indicated the facility was out of the prescribed narcotic pain medication so the resident was administered Fiorcet – a pain medication used to treat headaches.”

The progress notes at 4:15 PM indicate that “the resident put the call light on for pain medication and was informed by the nurse that the MD had not call back yet to order another medication as the facility was out of [the narcotic pain medication ordered by the resident’s doctor].”

“At 5:30 PM another nurse documented that the resident was concerned that pain medication and not been administered as ordered and left in a car with her family – against medical advice (AMA) – refusing to sign the forms.” The state investigator noted that “the facility failed to administer medication as ordered for pain management.”

Our Baltimore Maryland nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the nursing staff’s failure to provide pain medication after back surgery might cause the resident unbearable pain. The deficient practice by the administration to not have the prescribed medication on hand and the nursing staff’s failure to ensure the medication is given at the appropriate time might be considered mistreatment or neglect.

BRINTON WOODS HEALTH and Rehabilitation Center AT ARLINGTON WEST
3939 Penhurst Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21215
(410) 664-9535

A “For-Profit” 80-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Do Not Receive Psychoactive Medications without Proper Authority to Justify Its Use

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 07/24/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “monitor behaviors identified by the psychiatrist to justify the continued need/use of psychoactive medications.” In addition, the state surveyor noted the facility’s failure “to ensure that medication regimens were free from unnecessary medications.”

The deficient practice was noted by the state surveyor after a resident’s medical record review noting an anti-psychotic medication and other medications were used to treat depression.” However, a review of the resident’s 07/15/2015 Psychiatric Progress Note “revealed the recommendations included the following: monitor patient for tearfulness, isolation, excessive sleep, poor appetite, anxiety and agitation.” Additional review of the resident’s July 2015 Behavior Monitoring Flow Sheet “revealed the facility monitor the resident for paranoia, impaired functioning capacity.”

The state surveyor conducted a 07/22/2015 interview with the facility’s Quality Assurance Nurse and Director of Nursing who “confirm the facility staff failed to follow the psychiatrist recommendations to monitor the specific target behavior just for the continued need and use of psychoactive medications.” In addition, the state surveyor recognized that the facility staff “failed to identify and monitor specific target behaviors or symptoms to justify the continued need of psychoactive medications.”

Our Baltimore nursing home mistreatment attorneys recognize the failing to follow protocols and procedures when using psychoactive medications without proper authority to justify their use might be considered mistreatment or neglect. In addition, the deficient practice by the facility fails to follow the established policies adopted by Brinton Woods Health and Rehabilitation Center at Arlington West.
HOMEWOOD CENTER
6000 Bellona Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21212
(410) 323-4223

A “For-Profit” 112-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Investigate an Unexpected Death of the Resident to Ensure They Were Not the Victim of Abuse

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 03/24/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to initiate an investigation to determine if the unexpected death of the resident may have been the result of being a victim of abuse.

The complaint investigation was initiated after a 03/23/2015 11:57 AM interview with the facility’s Corporate Nurse when “she was informed that investigation was not provided to the survey team even though it had been requested on 03/19/2015.”

The state investigator conducted a 03/24/2015 8:08 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who “stated that there was nothing to investigate. She added that the Medical Director may have done an investigation but she was unsure […and] went on to report that she looks at the resident’s chart whenever there is an unexpected death and the Medical Director looks as well […and] that the facility did not have a copy of the death certificate from the Medical Examiner’s office [who] was involved at the family’s request. Death certificate was not obtained until 03/24/2015 after surveyor intervention.”

The state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s Reporting Incident “regarding an injury of unknown origin for [the deceased resident which] revealed that the Geriatric Nursing Assistant (GNA) found bruising on the resident’s right shoulder around 7:00 AM on 08/12/2014 […and] attempted to report this finding to the nurse who was on duty during the night shift […and] but that the nurse did not stop what she was doing to examine the resident.” The Geriatric Nursing Assistant informed the second nurse “who did examine the resident.” The state surveyor indicated that the first nurse asked by the GNA to examine the resident “was not interviewed to obtain a statement or find out why she did not assist the resident once notified of the new finding.”

The state surveyor noted that “the nurse who is assigned to the resident for the day shift on 08/12/2014 was not interviewed until 08/20/2014, eight days later” and that “an investigation is to be finished within five days to ensure resident safety while still providing staff time to do a thorough investigation.”

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow protocols and investigate an unexpected death to ensure the deceased resident was not a victim of abuse might be considered mistreatment or neglect. The deficient practice by the nursing staff and administration failed to follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by Homewood Center and violates federal and state nursing home regulations.

BLUE POINT NURSING and Rehabilitation CENTER
2525 West Belvedere
Baltimore, Maryland 21215
(410) 367-9100

A “For-Profit” 125-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent a Resident at High Risk for Eloping or from Wandering Away from the Facility Unsupervised

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 07/16/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “ensure the safety of a cognitively impaired resident who was assessed as an elopement risk as evidenced by the resident exiting the facility on 05/02/2015, unobserved, without supervision, and despite wearing a Wanderer Guard bracelet.” In addition, the state investigator noted the facility also failed “to initiate an investigation” once the resident was located and “failed to complete immediate corrective action until 05/08/2015 [six days later].” Because of this failure, the facility also “failed to maintain a safe environment for 17 residents [residing in the facility who] had already been identified as high risk for elopement.”

The state investigator noted that the resident had been admitted to the facility in a condition considered “ambulatory with an unsteady gait.” On the date of admission, the resident scored 17 on the elopement assessment indicating the resident “was a high risk for elopement.” As a result, “a wander guard bracelet was placed on the resident’s left ankle.”

A complaint investigation was initiated after a facility staff housekeeper and laundry assistant found the eloping resident at 12:20 PM on 05/02/2015. The resident was found “walking outside of the building.” The two staff employees redirected the resident “back into the building without incident [where the resident] was placed on 15 minute checks and later in the day one-to-one (close) staff observation. The resident was unable to state how she/he exited the building.”

Interviews were conducted at the time of the elopement involving the staff on hand “who transported a resident from dialysis into the building through the door on C wing, a few minutes after 12:00 PM on the date of the incident.” The investigation reports and documents “failed to identify the exit through which the resident eloped. The evidence crew denied seeing any residents outside upon entering or exiting the building and facility staff did not observe the resident leaving the building”

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s 05/03/2015 Care Plan “to address elopement risk and interventions.” Reviews of the facility “Administrative and Medical Records did not reveal evidence of an assessment of the functioning of the Wander Guard system at the exit doors on 05/02/2015 or on 05/03/2015.

The state surveyor concluded that the Facility Reported Incident “was substantiated as a past-noncompliance Immediate Jeopardy related to the elopement of a cognitively impaired resident, assessed as an elopement risk upon admission to the facility.”

Our Baltimore nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols and procedures that would minimize the potential of a resident eloping from the facility could cause an immediate jeopardy and significant harm to the resident’s health and well-being. The administration and nursing staff at Blue Point Nursing and Rehabilitation Center failed to follow the established procedures and protocols adopted by the facility and this deficient practice might be considered negligence or mistreatment.

Negligence in Maryland Nursing Facilities

It can be challenging to identify signs of abuse or neglect occurring in nursing facilities. This is often because the resident is incapacitated or has difficulty in communicating. Other times, the resident feels victimized and afraid to speak up to say what is happening. As an advocate for your loved one, it is crucial to look for obvious signs of neglect and abuse that could involve:

  • Unexplained injuries, broken bones, bruises, cuts and lacerations
  • Unexpected sudden weight loss or gain
  • Missing possessions
  • The nursing staff not allowing the resident to be alone with other residents or visitors
  • Residents that are over sedated
  • Signs of physical restraints such as bruising or reddened areas around the ankles and wrists

Suspicious That Something Is Just Not Right?

If you know or have a suspicion that something is just not right with your loved one in the nursing facility, further investigation or legal action might be required. The Baltimore nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC can obtain answers on your behalf to ensure that your loved one receives supportive care in a safe environment.

We encourage you to contact our Maryland elder abuse law offices today by calling (888) 424-5757 to schedule your free, full case evaluation. All cases are accepted on contingency, meaning no upfront fees are required.

For additional information on Maryland laws and information on nursing homes look here.

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

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