Springfield Area Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Springfield Nursing Home Injury Attorney

Federal and state health officials are reporting a significant shortage in the number of nursing facility beds available throughout many parts of the country, including Illinois. This shortage is likely to increase even more in the years ahead as the ever-increasing aging population reaches their retirement years. Unfortunately, the demand has placed a substantial burden on nursing facilities that have become overcrowded and unable to accommodate all the health and hygiene needs of their residents. In fact, The Springfield nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have seen a significant rise in the number of civil cases involving mistreatment, neglect and abuse happening in Illinois nursing facilities.

An Increasing Aging Demographic in Springfield, IL

Out of the more than 116,000 residents residing in the Springfield Illinois community, more than 15,000 are senior citizens. This number is likely much higher when factoring in the number of elderly that resides in Decatur, Jacksonville, Carlinville, Auburn, Mechanicsburg, Bradfordton, Sherman, New City, Chatham, Farmingdale, Riddle Hill and Rochester.

Reviewing Springfield Area Nursing Facilities

Our Illinois elder abuse attorneys continuously review publicly available information on nursing facilities throughout the state. We publish this information to assist families facing the undesirable decision to place a loved one in a nursing home under the watchful eye of a professional medical staff. Unfortunately, not every facility provides the highest level of care. Our team of dedicated nursing home abuse lawyers has posted their primary concerns opened investigations, filed complaints and health hazards on the facilities below. These nursing homes currently maintain a well below average rating compared other facilities nationwide.

Illinois Nursing Home Negligence Lawsuit Information

Our attorneys have compiled data from reported settlements and jury verdicts from across Illinois to give you an idea of what your case may be worth in a civil law context. We have broken down these cases according to case type and patient injury. Learn more about these Illinois nursing home lawsuit settlements below:

Aperion Care Jacksonville
1021 North Church St.
Jacksonville, IL 62650
(217) 245-4174

A “For-Profit” 113-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Physical Restraints

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 09/16/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “identify devices which limit resident movement as restraints, to obtain a physician order and informed consent prior to initiating restraints and [a failure] to assess the continued use of restraint for [a resident at the facility] reviewed for restraints.”

The resident’s Current Electronic Record “does not document restraint assessments, physician’s orders for the use of bolsters or the lap tray, informed consent for the use of bolsters, lap tray, and hand mitts, and no care plan addressing the use of the bolsters.” Alternatively, the resident’s 09/15/2015 Order Recap Report “documents that [the resident] has orders to continue restraints to prevent further injury, and keep mitts on hands at all times to prevent further injury to self every shift.”

An observation of the resident at 10:00 AM on 09/15/2015 noted that the resident “was in [the resident’s] bed with a bolster cushion on each side of [the resident] and hand mitts on [the resident’s] right and left hand.” Certified Nursing Assistant in charge of providing care stated “[the resident] is not able to remove [the resident’s] lap tray because of the strap behind the chair that latches… The bolsters are a fall prevention because [the resident] has fell out of bed before.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview at 2:05 PM on 09/15/2015 with the facility’s Care Plan Coordinator who stated that a family member of the resident “request the use of [the resident’s] lap tray. I am not sure how long ago, [the resident] had a fall, and the family member asked for the lap tray… I do not have restraint assessments for hand mitts, and since we did not consider the lap tray a restraint, I did not do a restraint assessment. I did not consider the bolsters a restraint so I have not done a restraint assessment for them either. I do not have the bolsters care planned.”

The Care Plan Coordinator then stated “My thoughts are they (bolsters) could be for safety, but [the resident] does not move around and [the resident’s] not able to get up… No therapy evaluation/notes were done for the use of [the resident’s] devices.”

Our Jacksonville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols in using restraints without informed consent and physician’s orders might be considered abuse or mistreatment. The deficient practice also violates the facility’s procedures, protocols and policies, especially the 03/18/2013 policy adopted by the facility titled: Resident Restraints that states in part:

“Physical restraints are any manual method or physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment attached or adjacent to the resident’s body that the individual cannot remove easily which restricts freedom of movement to normal access to one’s body… The use of restraints will be reviewed by the Interdisciplinary Team periodically and at least quarterly thereafter… A nurse will initiate a physical restraint assessment and consult with appropriate health professionals, such as Therapist, Social Service and Activity Personnel or others prior to using physical restraints.”

Capitol Health Care and Rehabilitation Center
555 W. Carpenter
Springfield, IL 62702
(217) 525-1880

A “For-Profit” 251-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Investigate a Report Allegations of Abuse, Neglect, Mistreatment or Misappropriation of Property

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/31/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “immediately report [… and] initiate a timely investigation of theft of money and belongings [of a resident at the facility].”

While the original theft of the resident’s property occurred on 12/25/2015, the Administrator stated in a 12/29/2015 11:00 AM interview that “he was not made aware until 12/28/2015 about [the resident’s] allegations of stolen money on 12/25/2015, and that is when he started his investigation.”

The state surveyor conducted a 1229 3:00 PM interview with the facility’s Dietary Manager who is serving as the Manager on duty the day after the incident. The Dietary Manager stated “she received a call from [the resident], who was at the hospital on 12/26/2015. [The resident] told [the Dietary Manager that] $23, a wallet and food from her refrigerator was stolen from [the resident] on 12/25/2015 while she was at the facility.” The Dietary Manager serving as the Manager on Duty stated “she was not aware that she needed to call the Administrator about stolen money.”

The state surveyor conducted a 12/29/2015 3:25 PM interview with the facility’s LPN (Licensed Practical Nurse) who stated that “on 12/25/2015 around 4 PM [the resident] was in the hallway yelling and screaming about something and then heard [the CNA (Certified Nursing Aide)] say [the resident] said she had $20 missing from her wallet. [The LPN] stated she saw [the resident’s] wallet and there was no money in the wallet.” The Licensed Practical Nurse then stated “she did not report this to the Administrator, she did not know about the procedure to go to the Administrator when a resident has money missing.”

In an interview with conducted by the state surveyor on 12/30/2015 at 3:15 PM, the Certified Nursing Aide on duty on the day the theft occurred stated “when she found out about the resident’s missing money she reported to her nurse [the LPN], not to the Administrator. “The investigation was not started until 12/28/2015.”

Our Springfield elder abuse attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols to report  and investigate allegations of abuse, neglect, mistreatment or financial exploitation directly violates established procedures adopted by Capitol Health Care and Rehabilitation Center.

Carlinville Rehabilitation and Health Care Center
751 North Oak St.
Carlinville, IL 62626
(217) 854-2511

A “For-Profit” 98-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/26/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “evaluate hazards and risks and implement the interventions including adequate supervision to prevent falls.” This deficient practice effects two residents at the facility.

The state surveyor reviewed documents and records and of a resident at the facility including the resident’s 04/08/2015 Minimum Data Set documenting that the resident “is totally dependent on to staff her bed mobility, transfers, ambulation. [The resident] has range of motion impairment on bilateral upper and lower extremities [… and] has no speech and is rarely/never understood [… but] usually understands.” The resident also has “severely impaired vision [… and] both short and long-term memory problems and has moderately impaired cognition.”

The facility’s 03/01/2015 through 04/21/2015 Occurrence Log documents that the resident “had a fall at 3:23 AM on 04/12/2015.” The Falls Details Report also documents that the CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant) found the resident “parallel to the bed on the right side of the floor [and] bed rails and alarms were not in use for [the resident] at the time of the fall.”

The Registered Nurse on duty documents that the CNA “turned and repositioned [the resident] at 3 AM on 04/12/2015 “while the Registered Nurse “gather dressing supplies for [the resident’ is] dressing changes [and] was called to [the resident’s] room and found [the resident] lying on her right side parallel to her bed.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing concluded that “based on investigation and staff interviews, [the resident] with voluntary and involuntary movement of extremities was positioned for dressing changes, and as a result of movement, resident rolled from bad onto the floor.”

The 03/29/2015 through 04/01/2015 Occurrence Reports were reviewed by the state surveyor that revealed “as a result of the fall, near the bathroom, [the resident had a large hematoma with bleeding that require transfer to the emergency room and a pressure dressing and pain medication for four days afterwards.”

Our Carlinville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols when providing treatment to residents could cause the resident harm which might be considered an act of negligence or mistreatment. In addition, does not follow the established policies adopted by Carlinville Rehabilitation and Health Care Center.

Prairie Village health care center
1024 W. Walnut
Jacksonville, IL 62650
(217) 245-5175

A “City Government Owned and Operated” 126-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 01/26/2016, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “provide adequate supervision by leaving an unlocked medication cart unattended.” This deficient practice potentially affects nine residents at the facility “who are mobile and cognitively impaired who might have had access to the unattended medication cart.”

The findings by the state surveyor on 01/19/2016 at 11:10 AM indicate that a nurse “left the medication cart at the nurses’ station unlocked, and while she went to look for medication down the hall and another medication cart.” The findings also indicate that “the medication cart was left unattended had a bubble pack of Entacapone 200 milligram laying on top of the medication cart [filled with] 60 tablets in the bubble pack.”

Later that morning at 11:47 AM, the same nurse “left the medication car unlocked the nurses station and went into the dining room to give a medication. The unlocked medication cart was left unattended [and] had a bottle of liquid Potassium Chloride sitting on top of the cart.” After the state surveyor reviewed a list of residents in the facility residing on 100 and 200 always “who were mobile and cognitively impaired” the surveyor indicated that all nine residents “could have had access to the unattended medication cart.”

Our Jacksonville elder abuse attorneys recognize that the facility failed to follow procedures and protocols might be considered negligence or mistreatment because the actions could have potentially caused serious harm to cognitively impaired residents living at Prairie Village Health Care Center. In addition, the failure by the nursing staff does not follow the facility’s 11/03/2014 policy titled: Policy and Procedures for Medication Administration that reads in part:

“During administration of medications, the medication cart is to be kept closed and locked when out of sight of the medication nurse or aide. No medications are kept on top of the cart. The cart must be clearly visible to the personnel administering medications, and all outward sides must be inaccessible to residents or others passing by. In addition, privacy is maintained at all times for all resident information (e.g. MAR) by closing the MAR book/covering the MAR sheet and computer screen when not in use.”

Aperion care Springfield
525 S. Martin Luther King Dr.
Springfield, IL 62703
(217) 789-1680

A “For-Profit” 65-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/18/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure that safety devices were in place, effective and functioning for [a resident at the facility] review for falls.”

The resident at the facility’s 05/18/2015 Minimum Data Set documents that the resident “hallucinates, requires extensive assistance with transfers, is incontinent at times, has poor balance, judgment and safety awareness.”

The facility’s “Accident/Incident Log documents that [the resident] has had falls on 04/12/2015, 05/25/2015 and 06/10/2015. All three fall investigations document that the falls occurred while [the resident] was attempting a self transfer.” The resident’s updated 04/08/2015 Plan of Care documents at the resident “will attempt dangerous physical assertions which put him at risk for falls. (I.e. self transferring).” In addition, the current care plan of the resident documents “a personal alarm either pressure or tab variety has been in place since 05/29/2015 as an intervention for his repeated falls.” The documentation indicates that beginning on 06/10/2015 the alarm “was to be on [the resident] at all times.”

However, the state surveyor observed the resident on 06/15/2015 at 1:30 PM while the resident “was resting in his room after lunch. His wheelchair was near the end of the bed. [The resident’s] personal alarm was on the back of his wheelchair, not attach the resident or his bed in any way.” An additional 06/16/2015 1:00 PM observation of the resident revealed that the resident “was again resting in his bed after lunch. His personal alarm was again attached to the back of his wheelchair, which was across his room near his closet, not attach to the resident while in bed.

The state surveyor conducted a 06/16/2015 3:00 PM interview with the facility’s CNA (Certified Nurses’ Aide) who stated “she was not aware that [the resident] did not have his alarm on, but he should. She also was not aware that his alarm had been changed to a pressure alarm, or that he was supposed to have it on all the time.”

The state surveyor conducted a 06/16/2015 3:00 PM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who stated “he is always taking the alarms off we tell him not to but he laughs and does it anyway. Has even taken a shirt off so he does not pull the tab alarm and the self transfers to the bathroom or his wheelchair. It should always be on him both in bed and when he is up in his chair and always out of his reach. I switched him to a pressure pad alarm and added to his daily tasks for the CNAs to check in document on each shift as of this morning.”

Our Springfield Illinois elder abuse attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols involving accidental falls could seriously injure the resident. The deficient practice of the nursing staff in failing to ensure that the resident is attached to his alarm might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it fails to follow established procedures and protocols adopted by Aperion Care Springfield.

Auburn rehabilitation and healthcare Center
304 Maple Ave.
Auburn, IL 62615
(217) 438-6125

A “For-Profit” 70-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols to Ensure Residents Remain Safe in Their Environment

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 01/12/2016, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide adequate supervision and assistive devices as needed to prevent falls.” This deficient practice directly affects two residents at the facility.”

The resident was re-admitted to the facility after an emergency visit to a local hospital on 12/29/2016 at 7:40 PM. The resident’s 12/29/2015 fall risk assessment indicates the resident is identified at high risk for falls as does the resident’s 01/06/2016 Care Plan for Falls. The resident has experience falls on both 12/30/2015 and 01/01/2016 at Auburn Rehabilitation and Health Care Center.

The initial 10:37 AM 12/23/2015 facility Progress Notes indicate that the resident was “on the floor outside of the bathroom door in complaining of severe pain in shoulder and neck. The notes document 911 was called and [the resident] was transported to the emergency room.” The resident returned to the facility without fractures. However, “the Occurrence Record of the fall does not document whether the alarm was sounding or not. The facility’s 12/30/2015 10:45 AM Progress Notes documented that the CNA obtained “a sensor pad alarm for resident’s bed and wheelchair on 12/29/2015 at 5:25 PM.

The 12/30/2015 9:47 PM progress notes and 12/31/2015 12:38 PM progress notes document that the resident “attempted to get out of bed independently.” On one occasion, the resident “has been yelling randomly. Answers staff questions nonsensically at times. Stated ‘They are taking all of my stuff’, refusing to wear his oxygen and becoming agitated when approached by staff.”

“On 01/01/2016 at 10:41 AM, [the resident] was again found in room on the floor. Noted visible bruises. The occurrence record again does not document whether the alarm was sounding or not.”

The state surveyor conducted a 01/12/2016 10:35 AM interview with the facility’s Administrator who stated “he was unaware if [the resident] alarm was sounding when he was found on the floor by [the registered physical therapist] that morning even though the alarm was implemented on 12/29/2015 as part of the falls prevention plan.” Additionally, on 01/12/2016 at 11:57 AM, the registered physical therapist indicated that “she was the first to see [the resident] on the floor on 12/30/2015 and no alarm was sounding [… and] she just noticed him on the floor as she was walking by.”

Our Auburn nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that the deficient practice of not maintaining a safe environment for every resident could cause harm or injuries. The failure might also be considered negligence or mistreatment because the facility failed to follow their own policies especially their Falls Prevention Policy/Procedure that states in part:

“Based on previous evaluations and current data, the staff will identify interventions related to the resident specific risks and causes to try to prevent the resident from falling and try to minimize complications from falling.”

Regency Care
2120 W. Washington
Springfield, IL 62702
(217) 793-4880

A “For-Profit” 95-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Accident Hazards

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/19/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “provide supervision to prevent elopement.” This deficient practice effective one resident at risk for eloping the facility.

Documentation of the facility indicated the resident has severely impaired cognition and is at high risk for elopement. The resident’s 11/06/2015 Care Plan documents that the resident “was placed on elopement risk and fitted with an individualized door alarm bracelet to manage the risk.”

However, the facility’s 08/10/2015 Incident Report documents the incident occurring on 08/03/2015 at “approximately 8 PM facility received a call from [a neighbor residing in the nearby residents] informing the facility that [the resident] had been escorted to his house by [a fast food delivery driver].” Two staff members from the facility “immediately went to [the facility’s neighbor’s house] and escorted [the resident] back to the facility.”

The state surveyor conducted a 9:30 AM 08/17/2015 interview with the facility’s Administrator who stated “that the facility investigation concluded that [the resident] was observed with family members of [another resident] in the facility’s outdoor back patio around 7:30 PM and at some point left through an open back gate undetected by staff.” The Administrator then stated “that no staff members were out in the patio area at the time.”

Our Springfield elder abuse attorneys recognize and any failure to follow protocols and provide adequate supervision to residents known to have severely impaired cognition might be considered negligence or mistreatment, especially if the resident wanders away from the facility. The deficient practice also fails to follow established procedures, protocols and policies adopted by Regency Care especially their October 2010 policy titled: Wandering Resident/Elopement that states in part:

“The facility will properly assess residents and plan their care to prevent accidents related to wandering behavior or elopement.”

Taking Action Against Negligent Springfield Nursing Homes

If you have your suspicions that your loved one is being neglected or abused while residing in a nursing facility, you can get help to stop the mistreatment now. The Springfield nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC can take immediate lawful action to hold those responsible for causing your loved one harm both financially and legally accountable. We urge you to contact our Illinois elder abuse law office today at (888) 424-5757 to schedule your free, no obligation full case review.

For additional information on Illinois laws and information nursing homes look here.

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

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