Quarterly Review Of Illinois Nursing Homes Reveals Major Problems

The Illinois Department of Public Health has recently published its quarterly (April – June 2008) calander report for Illinois Nursing Home receiving citations.  The report indicates findings of violations for nursing homes which were in violation of the Nursing Home Care Act.  The State of Illinois has recommended decertification of the facility to the Director of Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, or the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for violations in relation to patient care pursuant to Titles XVIII and XIX of the Social Security Act.

All of the facilities cited in the quarterly report have ‘Type A Violations.’  A type A violation is the most serious licensure violation imposed by the state.  Type A violations pertain to situations where serious physical harm or death may result from the facilities conduct.

The links for the Second Quarter Results for the offending nursing homes are not working.  However, the links for the First Quarter Results are, among some of the low-lights findings from the First Quarter of 2008 are:

Ambassador Nursing Center: Chicago, IL, Type-A violation, $25,000 fine for allowing a cognitively impaired resident to smoke unsupervised outside.  While attempted to light a cigarette, the resident caught himself on fire and died.  The facility violated its own resident smoking policy.

Imperial of Hazel Crest: Evanston, IL, Type-A violation, $30,000 fine for failing to implement a program for prevention of bedsores.  The resident at issue developed a stage four pressure sore without any staff intervention.  The resident required hospitalization for treatment of the pressure sore and accompanying infection.

McAllister Nursing & Rehab: Tinley Park, IL, Type-A violation, $10,000 fine for an incident where the staff kicked an elderly resident in the knee.  The incident of physical abuse was admitted by the nursing home employee in an interview.

Pershing Convalescent Home: Berwyn, IL, Type-A violation, $20,000 fine failing to properly implement a fall prevention policy for residents.  An 85-year old was admitted to the facility with a history of falls and dementia.  The resident had 4 unwitnessed falls within a 3 month period.

Regal Health And Rehab Center: Oak Lawn, IL, Type A violation, $30,000 fine for consistently failing to provide care outlined in their resident assessments.  The state inspector noticed that several records were pre-dated–in other words the nursing home staff completed the medical chart indicating the care provided before it was actually done.  In several instances, the state investigator noticed residents with bedsores without dated wound dressings and residents sitting in soiled sheets with open wounds.

Rest Haven South Nursing Home: South Holland, IL, Type A violation, $32,500 fine for failing to report and incident to a state agency for an incident where the resident fell out of bed and received a closed head injury.  Under the law, nursing homes must report incidents with injury to the department of public health within 24 hours.

Trinity Living Center #3: Joliet, IL Type A violation, $10,000 fine for an incident where the a nurses aide failed to call the paramedics or start CPR upon finding an unresponsive resident.

The above are just a sampling of violations for the quarter.  As you can see, these are major health and safety violations.  Will the fines against the facilities be enough to improve patient care? When deciding where to place a loved one for care, be on the lookout for the above facilities.

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