Meadowview Nursing and Respiratory Care

Injured Meadowview Nursing and Respiratory Care Residents to Receive Monetary Compensation

The state of New Jersey and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) conduct unexpected investigations and unannounced surveys on every nursing facility statewide. Their efforts help to identify serious violations and health deficiencies that have or could compromise the well-being of the facility’s residents.

In some cases, the level of issues at a nursing home are so egregious and the underlying problems that because the violations so challenging that the facility is unable to make corrections. When this occurs, the state and federal regulators typically designate the nursing home as a Special Focus Facility (SFF) and place the Center on the Federal Medicare watchlist.

If the nursing home owner, operator, administrator, nursing staff and other employees failed to make the necessary adjustments, the facility might lose their contract to provide care to Medicare and Medicaid patients.

Over a year ago, state and federal nursing home regulators designated Meadowview Nursing and Respiratory Care Center a Special Focus Facility. According to publicly available information, since then, the facility has yet to make significant improvements at a level to be removed from the Federal watchlist.

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Meadowview Nursing & Respiratory Care

This Facility is a “for-profit” Center providing cares and services to the residents of Williamstown and Gloucester County, New Jersey. The 180-certified bed Long Term Care Home is located at:

1420 S. Blackhorse Pike
Williamstown, NJ 08094
(856) 875-0100

Current Nursing Home Resident Safety Concerns

The state of New Jersey and The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services regularly update the Medicare.gov website with current information about every facility statewide. This information details health violations, safety concerns, incident inquiries, opened investigations, filed complaints, and dangerous hazards. Additionally, the site provides visitors a quick analysis of nursing homes based on a star rating summary system.

Currently, Meadowview Nursing and Respiratory Care maintains a much below average one out of five stars overall rating compared to all other facilities nationwide. This ranking includes a much below average one out of five stars for health inspections, one out of five stars for staffing, and three out of five stars for quality measures.

Over the last three years, the facility has undergone 98 complaint investigations that resulted in citations. Some concerns over safety hazards, violations and deficiencies are listed below.

  • Failure to Ensure That Services Provided by the Nursing Staff Meet Professional Standards of Quality

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, the state investigator noted the facility had failed to “follow acceptable standards of clinical practice with clarification of an incomplete physician’s orders.” The investigator had reviewed a resident’s medical record on the morning of June 14, 2017. “During the record review, the surveyor observed the June 29, 2017 physician’s orders” that have been transcribed “onto the June 2017 Treatment Administration Record [TAR]. The order did not state when/how often to check the resident’s pulse oximetry or how much oxygen to give the resident if needed.”

In a separate summary statement of deficiencies dated March 13, 2017, the state investigator noted the failure of the nursing staff to “document the Medication Administration Records (MAR) and Treatment Administration Record (TAR) to indicate that the medications or treatments were administered according to physician’s orders.” The investigator showed evidence of the deficient practice by reviewing documentation on the resident’s activities of daily living, physician’s orders, and MAR through May.

The doctor had left physician’s orders to administer eyedrops into the patient’s eyes six times a day at specific times. However, a review of the resident’s May 2016 MARs “reflected that there was no documentation on the MARs to indicate medication was given” at certain times by the physician’s orders.

  • Failure to Provide Care for Residents in a Way That Keeps or Builds Their Dignity and Respect of Individuality

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, the state investigator noted the facility’s failure “to treat all residents in a dignified manner by being considerate with their voices while residents slept.” This deficient practice affected six residents at the facility.” Four residents stated at a Group Interview that “the noise level was very high at night. All four residents concurred that they had observed staff members standing in the hallway outside the rooms and overheard them talking and loud voices, sometimes about personal business and at other times in another language which disturbed their sleep.”

One resident stated “that one night the noise was so loud that [they] attempted to close the door to [their] room and was stopped by a staff member. The resident stated the staff member told [them that they] were not allowed to shut the door for safety reasons.” Another resident was interviewed on the morning of June 12, 2017 “during the initial tour the facility.” The resident was “sitting in a wheelchair in the hallway outside [their] room. At that time, the resident told the surveyor that the staff woke [them] up early in the morning by talking very loudly.”

The investigator conducted a follow-up conversation on the early morning of June 16, 2017, where resident “that the staff at night was noisy.” The resident stated that the staff “on the 11 to 7 shift will often wake him up with the talking.” The resident stated “it was often difficult for [the resident] to go back to sleep because once [they] were woken up, [their] right arm would begin to shake. The resident stated that the staff has no consideration for the residents.” The resident’s arm shook during the interview.

  • Failure to Review the Work of Each Nurse Eight Every Year and Given a Regular In-Service Training Based upon the Review

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 13, 2017, the state investigator noted that the facility had failed to “file their own policy titled Performance Appraisal Program: Employee [involving three] Certified Nursing Assistants [CNA]” at the facility. The investigator proved the deficient practice by showing evidence including:

  • “A review of a CNA personnel file showed the hire date as May 22, 1990. The last annual performance evaluation was dated June 11, 2007. There is no current evaluations in the personnel file for this employee.”
  • “A review of [another] CNA personnel file showed the date of hire as November 23, 1992. The last annual performance evaluation was dated November 23, 1992. There is no current evaluations in the personnel file for this employee.”
  • “A review of [a third] CNA personnel file showed the date of hire as July 2, 2014. There were no performance evaluations in the personnel file for this employee.”

The surveyor interviewed the facility’s Director of Nursing on March 13, 2017, who stated “no there are no recent employee performance evaluations. I did not do any last year.” The investigator reminded the Director and Home of the facility’s “policy titled: Performance Appraisal Program: Employee with an effective date of June 1, 2002, and a revision date of November 28, 2016.” Under the Policy section, it reads:

“Managers will meet with their full-time, regular part-time, and regular casual employees at least annually to conduct a performance appraisal. To recognize performance, measure results, established development opportunities, and set goals for the coming year.”

  • Failure to Have a Licensed Pharmacist Review Every Resident’s Drugs At Least Once a Month and Report Irregularities

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, the state investigator noted the facility’s failure “to act upon recommendations made by the Consultant Pharmacist (CP) regarding the administration of medication for a resident.” The investigator reviewed the resident’s medical records that contained a “form titled Note to Attending Physician/Prescriber” dated May 22, 2017. The note was “from the Consultant Pharmacist to the attending physician requesting that the physician review the resident’s continued need for Vitamin D, Calcium Citrate and Alendronate.”

The Consultant Pharmacist “also questioned the clinical benefit of these medications for [the resident] and wanted documentation “as to [whether they] agreed or disagreed with the recommendations.” The form allowed “the resident or prescriber [to] sign and date the form in the indicated areas. The response action was blank and the form had not been signed or dated.”

An interview was conducted with the Unit Manager on June 15, 2017, who “confirmed that the Consulting Pharmacist’s recommendations from May 22, 2017, had not been addressed by [the resident’s] attending physician. Also, the Unit Manager stated that the attending physician prefers to review and respond to the Consulting Physician Pharmacist’s recommendations when he had to sign off on the monthly [medication orders].”

The investigator interviewed the facility’s Director of Nursing on the morning of June 16, 2017, who stated that “on June 15, 2017, the Nurse Practitioner reviewed and addressed the Consultant Pharmacist’s recommendations for May 22, 2017.”

  • Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce Programs and Investigate, Control and Keep Infections from Spreading

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, the state investigator noted the facility’s failure “to follow appropriate infection control procedures with handwashing during the medication pass. This deficient practice was identified [for one nurse] observed during the medication pass with [three residents].”

An observation was made by the surveyor of a facility’s Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) on a medication pass. On seven separate occasions, the LPN was observed washing hands with soap and water before administering medication to different residents. In the first incident, the LPN wash their hands “with soap and water for 15 seconds.” In the second through seventh incidents of washing hands, the LPN used soap and water for seven seconds, nine seconds, five seconds (with shampoo/body wash), five seconds, seven seconds, and four seconds respectively.

The surveyor reviewed the facility’s policy Infection Control Policies and Procedures provided by the facility’s Director of Nursing. The policy read in part:

“Staff should wet hands, apply soap and rub vigorously outside the stream of water for 20 seconds covering all surfaces of the hands and fingers.”

The Director stated in front of the surveyor, Administrator, survey team, and corporate nurse that they “had an intention to educate and re-educate staff on hand hygiene.

Do You Need to File a Neglect or Abuse Compensation Claim Against a New Jersey Facility?

Were you injured or lose a loved one through abuse and neglect while residing in any nursing facility, like Meadowview Nursing and Respiratory Care? If so, consider hiring a New Jersey nursing home negligence lawyer who specializes in neglect and abuse compensation claims. An attorney working on your behalf can ensure that all the required paperwork and documentation are filed in the appropriate county courthouse before the statute of limitations expires.

Like all personal injury cases and wrongful death lawsuits, nursing home abuse compensation claims are handled by attorneys through contingency fee agreements. This arrangement provides you instant legal representation without making an upfront payment. All your legal services will be paid once the case is resolved by the attorney working on your behalf through a jury trial or a negotiated out-of-court settlement.

For information on local facilities and attorneys with experience handling NJ nursing home negligence cases in particular areas, look at the page below.

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