Jonesboro Arkansas Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Jonesboro Nursing Homes Abuse LawyersAs the life expectancy of the US population continues to increase, many more individuals are living much longer. Unfortunately, living longer does not always equate to a quality of living. Often times, family members have no other choice than to place a loved one in a nursing facility where statistics show that approximately one out of every 10 elderly citizens will experience some type of abuse or neglect. In fact, the Jonesboro nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have seen a significant rise in the number of civil action lawsuits against nursing facilities and staff members in recent years.

There are approximately 7500 seniors living within the Jonesboro city limits and more than double that in the community surrounding Craighead County. The limited number of nursing facilities and the rise of the senior citizen population in Arkansas has placed a heavy burden on nursing home administrators and staff members attempting to meet the health and hygiene needs of their residents. Many of the problems leading to abuse and neglect in nursing facilities could be avoided if nursing home managers took action on the overcrowded conditions, mismanagement and placing profits ahead of residents’ needs.

Jonesboro Nursing Home Resident Health Concerns

Abuse and neglect occurring in nursing facilities can be the quiet horrors that usually go unnoticed. Many victims suffer in silence for the fear of retaliation or lack of capacity to speak out. Because of that, the Craighead County nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC serve as legal advocates to nursing home residents throughout Arkansas. In addition, we continuously assess publicly available information regarding health concerns, opened investigations and filed complaints against nursing facilities in Jonesboro and surrounding communities. We post this information below in an effort to inform family members of how to make the best decision of where to place a love that requires quality care.

Comparing Jonesboro Area Nursing Homes

The information below has been accumulated by our Arkansas elder abuse law firm that details nursing facilities throughout the Jonesboro area currently maintaining a below average rating, as outlined in the national Medicare.gov database. In addition, we’ve added here our own primary concerns and provide evidence gathered by state surveyors and investigators through scheduled surveys and unannounced inspections throughout the year.

Information on Arkansas Nursing Home Abuse & Negligence Lawsuits

Our attorneys have compiled data from settlements and jury verdicts across Arkansas to give you an idea as to how cases are valued. Learn more about the cases below:

JONESBORO HEALTH AND REHABILITATION CENTER
1705 Latourette Drive
Jonesboro, Arkansas 72404
(870) 935-7550

A “For-Profit” 136-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Procedures and Protocols to Prevent the Development of New Pressure Sores or to Allowed Existing Pressure Sores to Heal

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/14/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure a pressure reducing cushion was provided when in a chair to prevent potential deterioration of existing pressure ulcers.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility but had “the potential to affect four residents who had pressure ulcers.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state investigator reviewed a resident’s Quarterly Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) of 08/02/2015. The records showed that the resident’s Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) scored 3 where a score between 0-7 indicate severe impairment. The document also indicated that the resident “required extensive assistance for bed mobility, personal hygiene and bathing, required limited assistance for transfer, walking in room and corridor, on toilet use, was at risk for pressure sores and [did not have a pressure sore].”

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s Hospital Wound Healing Document that indicated a “new wound to the left posterior thigh” on 04/08/2015 indicated as a “stage III pressure ulcer” with intervention requiring body repositioning every 1 to 2 hours along with “pad under posterior thigh to help reduce pressure from edge of chair.” The form documented that the measurements of the resident’s pressure ulcer measured 0.8 centimeters in length, 1.0 centimeters in width and 0.1 centimeters in depth with granulation tissue.

On 08/11/2015 at 7:10 AM, and observation of the resident was made indicated that the resident “was sitting in the dining room in a dining room chair. There was no cushion under her thighs.” Later that same day at 10:40 AM, “the resident was in the dining room, asleep, in the dining room chair with a seat. There was no cushion under her thighs.”

Two days later on 08/13/2015 at 8:10 AM, and observation was made revealing that “the resident was in the dining room for breakfast, sitting at the table in the dining room chair. There is no cushion under the resident’s thighs.” Later that day at 12:04 PM, “the resident was in the dining room sitting at a table in a dining room chair. Her eyes were closed and her head was slumped to one side. There was no cushion under thighs.”

At dinner time that same day at 5:15 PM, “the resident was in the dining room sitting at a table in the dining room chair. There was a folded sheet in the seat of the chair [however] there was no cushion under the resident’s thighs.

The following morning at 8:10 AM [08/14/2015], “the resident was in the dining room sitting in a dining room chair. The state surveyor asked the Licensed Practical Nurse providing care to the resident “to check the chair the resident was sitting in and determine if the resident was sitting on a cushion or pillow. [The Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) observed the resident and replied] ‘No’.” When asked if the resident was supposed to be sitting on a pillow or cushion while in a chair, the LPN replied, “Not that I know of.” The state surveyor then asked a Certified Nursing Assistant in charge of providing the resident care “if she was aware of the need for the resident to have a cushion under thighs while up in the chair.” The CNA replied, “Yes, I knew it.”

Our Jonesboro by the nursing staff to follow protocols and procedures when providing care to residents suffering bedsores could cause extensive harm or injury if the bedsores allowed to degrade. The ongoing deficient practice of the nursing staff at Jonesboro Health and Rehabilitation Center in their failure to follow protocols might be considered negligence or mistreatment.

GREENE ACRES NURSING HOME
2402 Country Club Road
Paragould, Arkansas 72450
(870) 236-8771

A “Not for Profit” 143-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure That All Residents Entering the Nursing Facility without a Catheter Receive Proper Services to Prevent Urinary Tract Infections

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/23/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure staff avoiding the use of cross contamination with fecal matter during perineal care to prevent potential urinary tract infection.” In addition, the facility also failed “to ensure all fecal matter was thoroughly cleansed from the perineum and rectal area during incontinent care and/or toileting.” The deficient practices by the nursing staff at Greene Acres Nursing Home affected one resident at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted after the state investigator reviewed the resident’s Quarterly Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) of 07/27/2015 that revealed the resident was severely impaired in cognitive skills for daily decision-making. In addition, the resident required: extensive assistance for two or more staff for bed mobility, transfers, toilet use and personal hygiene, was totally dependent on two or more staff for bathing, was always incontinent of bowel and bladder and had a Multi Drug Resistant Organism (MDRO) and a Urinary Tract Infection within the past 30 days.

The resident’s 02/23/2015 Laboratory Culture Report documented that the resident was positive for urine cultures of Escherichia coli. Nearly 4 months later, the resident’s 06/16/2015 Laboratory Culture Report documented that the resident was positive with Proteus Mirabilis.

An observation was made on August 17 at 2015 at 8:40 AM of two Certified Nursing Assistants giving the resident the shower in a whirlpool bathtub. Observations were made of brown flex seen swirling around the resident’s feet to the top. One CNA stated “she’s had a bowel movement and released the water.” The other CNA “wet a washcloth, placed body wash on the cloth and wash the resident’s legs and feet with a washcloth, then rested a used washcloth on the resident’s left shoulder while [the first CNA] cleans the resident’s feet.” Using the same washcloth used to clean the resident’s feet that now contained “feces contaminated water… Wash the resident’s groin, pubic area in upper part of the outer labia. Brown smears were seen on the cloth, and the cloth was changed.”

The surveyor conducted an interview with both CNAs and 9:25 AM on 08/18/2015 stating that they were observed “washing the resident’s feet that had been in the water with the bowel movement, then rested the same cloth on the resident’s shoulder and then wash the groin and top part of the genitals.” The surveyor then asked “are you supposed to wash the genitals with the same cloth used on the feet?” The CNA replied, “No.” The state surveyor then asked the CNA “when there is still bowel movement on the cloth when you finish wiping, how do you know if you remove all the bowel movement?” The CNA replied, “I guess you don’t.”

Our Paragould nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow procedures and protocols to minimize the potential risk of Urinary Tract Infections could cause significant injury or harm to residents. The deficient practices of the CNAs at Greene Acres Nursing Home might be considered mistreatment or negligence, especially if the resident develops an infection.

LAWRENCE HALL NURSING CENTER
1051 West Free Street
Walnut Ridge, Arkansas 72476
(870) 886-1295

A “Not for Profit” 179-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars

1 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Necessary Services and Care to Ensure the Resident Maintains the Highest Level of Their Well-Being

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 02/27/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure license staff continue to provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) when the resident was found without vital signs.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility “that documented full code status in their clinical record.” The failure of the nursing staff at Lawrence Hall Nursing Center “resulted in Immediate Jeopardy which could have caused the death of a resident at the facility.”

The staff also failed “to provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) upon identification of a lack of vital signs have the potential to cause more than minimal harm to 56 residents who had documented full code status in their clinical records.”

The deficient practice was noted after review of the resident’s 14-day Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) documenting that the resident “had moderately impaired cognitive skills for daily decision-making, and was totally dependent on staff for all activities of daily living.

In an interview conducted with the facility’s Director of Nursing it was noted that throughout the time that the resident was at the facility their “code status did not change during her admission here and she was still a full code.”

The incident was noted in the facility’s nurse’s notes and signed by a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) who documented that a Certified Nursing Assistant “was in the room at 5:30 PM to check in on [the] resident and turn the resident, which at this time, [the] resident was fine.” The Certified Nursing Assistant returned to the resident’s room “at 6:30 PM to get resident’s vital signs when she noticed resident was not breathing. [The] Charge Nurse was notified, who started CPR at that time. At this time, it was evident the resident had expired. Responsible party, coroner and medical doctor [were] notified.

The state surveyor conducted an interview the following morning with the LPN at the scene of the incident the previous evening who stated “I was the nurse who initiated CPR and I would say I did it about 10 minutes or so. She had passed away but I wasn’t 100% sure so I initiated CPR. No one took over. She had no breath, her face color had changed and pupils were fixed. The coroner came after I stopped CPR and called him. No ambulance was called. I was busy in the room… I don’t know why an ambulance wasn’t called.”

The Licensed Practical Nurse continued the interview by stating “the protocol for CPR, I was told by the other nurse, if they were already passed not to initiate CPR. She had stuff out of her mouth was bleeding from her nose on initiation. If it had been a witnessed arrest she would have gone to the ER. We have a back board and Ambu bag but no chemical crash cart here. I am certified but didn’t have the chemicals. To [the] best of my knowledge, we don’t have an Automated Emergency Defibrillator or full crash cart.”

The state surveyor asked the Director of Nursing what is to be done if the resident is a full code and absent of vital signs. The Director of Nursing indicated that “CPR should be started if someone is full code and has no vital signs. CPR should only be stopped when you have emergency people to take over.” The Director of Nursing also stated that at the present time facility had “no policy on CPR.”

Our Walnut Ridge nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow protocol and initiate and continue CPR when a resident is documented as being “full code” could cause an immediate jeopardy that results in the death of the resident. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Lawrence Hall Nursing Center might be considered mistreatment or a negligent act that resulted in the resident’s death.

CRESTPARK WYNNE
400 Arkansas Street
Wynne, Arkansas 72396
(870) 238-7941

A “For-Profit” 137-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Properly Consult with the Resident’s Doctor in Regards to Admission Orders When a Resident is Admitted to the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 03/27/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure the physician was promptly consulted regarding admission orders [of a resident being admitted to the facility].” While this failure directly affected one resident the deficient practice “have the potential to affect five residents who returned from a hospital in the past 30 days.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state investigator conducted a full review of a resident’s Significant Change Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) of 02/26/2015 whose Staff Assessment of Mental Status was found to be moderately impaired in cognitive skills for daily decision-making. In addition, the documentation noted that the resident “was dependent on the physical assist of one person for eating, was five feet and seven inches tall, weighed 318 pounds and received 51% or more nutrition via feeding tube.”

The state surveyor conducted a review of the resident’s 03/13/2015 Hospital Medication Reconciliation Discharge that noted there were physician’s orders for various medications and in order to provide medication through a PEG (percutaneous endogastronomy) tube daily.” However, as of 3 PM on 03/25/2015 “there were no readmission orders. When asked, the Registered Nurse on duty “was unable to locate the orders in the resident’s clinical records and stated ‘I don’t know where the orders are, but there are a couple of places I can check’.”

The state surveyor asked the APN (Advanced Practical Nurse) at 4:15 PM on 03/25/2015 “if the resident was supposed be receiving [their medication]. She stated she would have to check, but if it was ordered, she was supposed be receiving it.”

Our Wynne nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow procedures and protocols when admitting a resident into a facility could jeopardize their health and well-being if physician orders cannot be found. The deficient practice of the nursing staff at Crestpark Wynne might be considered mistreatment or negligence.

BATESVILLE HEALTH AND REHABILITATION CENTER
1975 White Drive
Batesville, Arkansas 72501
(870) 698-1853

A “For-Profit” 150-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols to Investigate, Control and Maintain Infection from Spreading Throughout the Facility

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/18/2015, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure their contact isolation policy and procedures implemented by failing to ensure staff and visitors were alerted to the needed precautions prior to entering the room of [a resident at the facility].” While the deficient practice of the nursing staff involved one resident at the facility “on contact isolation to prevent the potential spread of infection” that have the potential “to affect eight residents who resided on the 400 hall and shared staff with the resident.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state investigator conducted a thorough review of the resident’s Quarterly Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) of 10/22/2015 that documented the resident’s Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) showed a score of 6 (where a score of 0-7 indicates severe cognitive impairment). The document also indicated that the resident “required extensive assistance of two-plus persons for transfer, dressing and toileting and is totally dependent on the assistance of bathing.”

The state surveyor made an observation of the facility and numerous times and on numerous days noting that their “was no sign on the door to the resident’s room to alert staff and visitors to check with the nurse before entering the room” on 12/14/2015 at 1:57 PM, and multiple times on 12/15/2015 and 12/16/2015.

The state surveyor conducted a 9:45 AM 12/17/2015 interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who was asked about the lack of signage on the resident’s door. The Director responded “there was one sign on there, but it’s not there now.”

Our Batesville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to follow protocols to investigate, control and maintain infection, to ensure that it does not spread throughout the facility and has a potential causing serious harm to other residents. The failure of the nursing staff at Batesville Health and Rehabilitation Center might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their deficient practice fails to follow the facility’s policy and procedures for contact isolation cautions that reads in part:

“Post an isolation notice sign on the room entrance door instructing staff and visitors to report to the nursing station before entering the room.”

WOOD-LAWN HEIGHTS
2800 Neeley St
Batesville, Arkansas 72501
(870) 793-7195

A “Not for Profit” 140-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure That Residents Receive Proper Services to Prevent Urinary Tract Infections and Restore Normal Bladder Function

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/04/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure a front to back cleansing direction was used during incontinence care to increase the potential for further Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs).” In addition, the facility also failed “to ensure urine was cleansed from all areas of the resident’s skin in order to maintain good hygiene.”

While the deficient practice of the nursing staff directly affected two residents at the facility who relies on staff for incontinence care, the failures have the potential to “affect 88 residents who resided at the facility and were incontinent.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state investigator thoroughly assessed and reviewed the resident’s Annual Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) of 03/09/2015 revealing the resident’s Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) scored at 3 (for a score of 0-7 indicate severely impaired). In addition, the document revealed that the resident “was totally dependent on staff for toilet use and personal hygiene and was always incontinent of bowel and bladder.” In addition, the resident’s 09/05/2014 Care Plan documents “the potential complications related to UTI [where] perineal care [should be performed] PRN (as needed). The resident’s 11/20/2014 urine culture lab results indicated that the resident tested positive for Escherichia coli.

The state surveyor observed two Certified Nursing Assistants providing incontinent care for the resident at 9:15 AM on 06/02/2015 “who had been incontinent of urine.” After one CNA “clean the groin and perineal area from front to back, the resident was turned onto her right side [when the CNA] then wiped the resident twice from back to front. On the angled area toward the urinary meatus. The left buttocks were cleaned, then the resident was turned onto her left side and a new brief was applied. The right buttock area, posterior and inner thighs were not cleaned.”

The state surveyor conducted a 10:27 AM 06/03/2015 interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who was asked which direction the Certified Nursing Assistants were taught “to wipe the perineal area. She stated front to back” indicating it was to prevent a UTI.

Our Batesville nursing home neglect attorneys recognize that failing to provide proper services to prevent the development of Urinary Tract Infections or restore normal bladder function could cause the resident harm or serious injury. The deficient practices of the nursing staff at Wood Lawn Heights does not follow the established procedures and protocols as outlined in the facility’s policies and procedures titled: Perineal Care that reads in part:

“For the female resident, separate labia, and wipe urinary meatus front and back. Wipe one side of the labia than the other side. Cleanse resident’s buttocks and anus, washing from front to back.”

CROWNPOINT HEALTH and rehabilitation CENTER
1203 South Bend Drive
Horseshoe Bend, Arkansas 72512
(870) 670-5134

A “For-Profit” 78-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility

Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars

2 star rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Residents an Environment Free of Unnecessary Physical Restraints

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 05/22/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “ensure full side rails were utilized only one medically necessary, as evidenced by failure to attempt a less restrictive device before the application of full side rails.” In addition, the facility failed “to ensure medical symptoms that necessitated restraint use was identified and documented.” The facility also failed “to obtain informed consent prior to application of a restraint.” While these failures directly affected one resident at the facility “who used fall rigid side rails while in bed” the deficient practices “have the potential to affect two residents who used fall rigid side rails.”

The deficient practice was noted after the state surveyor conducted a full review of a resident’s Quarterly Minimum Data Set with Assessment Reference Date (ADR) of 03/13/2015 that revealed the resident’s Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) score as 1 (where a score between 0-7 indicates severe cognitive impairment). In addition, the documentation revealed that the resident “was totally dependent on the physical assistance of two-plus people for bed mobility, transfers and toilet use, did not walk, was totally dependent on the physical assistance of one person for personal hygiene, had limitation in range of motion of one upper extremity in both lower extremities and had experienced no falls since admission or prior admission.”

A review of the resident’s 04/18/2014 Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) ADL (activities of daily living) Care Plan documents the use of Restraints and reads in part “Important: check every hour and release every two hours – provide care. Side rails – Yes. Used. All Times.” The physician’s orders indicate “Side rails full (time) to enable resident to safely (lie) in bed.”

The state surveyor reviewed the facility’s Special Occurrence Log (Incidents and Accidents) dated 02/01/2015 to 05/11/2015 indicating “the resident had no falls or incidences documented on the log.” As a result, the state surveyor conducted an 8:40 AM 05/20/2015 interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who is asked “do you have the pre-restraint assessment (for least restrictive restraint device), informed consent, medical diagnoses and attempts of non-restraint alternatives for [the resident]?” The Director of Nursing responded, “There is no pre-assessment on him, she [the facility’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) Coordinator] never did one.”

The surveyor asked the facility’s Registered Nurse Consultant “if the informed consent was obtained for the use of side rails” who replied, “the (alarm) and full side rails up 2×2 orders have been in place before the nurses (Director of Nursing and MDS Coordinator) ever got here.”

The state surveyor notes that as of 11:17 AM on 05/22/2015, “the requested documentation of alternative measures attempted, informed consent for use of a physical restraint device and an assessment for the least restrictive restraint device had not been provided.”

Our Horseshoe Bend nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failing to provide residents an environment free of unnecessary and unconsented physical restraints might be considered abuse or mistreatment. In addition, the deficient practices of the nursing staff, physician and administration fails to follow the established protocols and policies adopted by Crownpoint Health and Rehabilitation center.

The Symptoms and Signs of Abuse and Neglect

Although many of the symptoms and signs are obvious that the loved one is being abused or neglected, others often go undetected because of their subtlety. Unfortunately, many of these types of cases cause significant harm or injury to the resident because they go undetected or unnoticed until long after the damage is done.

Statistics indicate that only individuals experiencing mental or physical abuse while residing in a nursing home are 300 times more likely to die prematurely compared to those who have not suffered negligence or abuse.

Unfortunately, many families and friends are unaware of the most common forms of abuse and neglect occurring in nursing facilities which include:

  • Facility-Acquired Pressure Sores – Often referred to as bedsores, decubitus ulcers or pressure ulcers, bedsores are actually skin injuries that develop on the person’s skin when left to sit in a wheelchair or lie in bed without moving for an extended period of time. The constant pressure on certain body parts restrict blood flow and creates a bedsore that can develop within a couple of hours.
  • Broken Bones – The elderly tend to be highly susceptible to breaking a hip, knee or other bones due to weakened eyesight, poor balance or osteoporosis. Because of that, nursing facilities are required to provide additional assistance when required if the individual needs help with bathing, walking, toileting, transferring (in and out of bed/wheelchair), eating or drinking.
  • Uncharacteristic Behaviors and Depression – Living in a nursing facility can produce feelings of worthlessness or heightened ongoing psychological distress. Often times when the resident is living in an overcrowded facility, there is not adequate staff on hand to provide encouragement to participate in activities to overcome depression or other unusual or uncharacteristic behaviors.
  • Malnutrition or Dehydration – One serious sign that physical abuse is occurring at the facility are indicators of malnutrition or dehydration that is often the result of blocking access to needed food and water.
  • Welts or Bruises – While the nursing staff may indicate that the bruises and welts are the result of the resident being clumsy or involved in an unfortunate accident, these noticeable signs might be caused by the use of physical restraints or abusive behavior by the nursing staff or other residents.

Abuse through verbal, physical or emotional means – often times, nursing staff can be demeaning or degrading to the resident who may be a challenge when providing care and services. Other times, they might be the victim of physical assault caused by resident to resident attacks or the nursing staff/employees who may be too harsh emotionally, physically or verbally in their effort to provide care.

Hiring a Lawyer

If you have any suspicions or see indicators that your loved one residing in a nursing home has been mistreated, abused or neglected, it is crucial to take immediate steps now. The Jonesboro nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC will fight aggressively to ensure justice has been served by holding those responsible for causing your loved one harm financially and legally accountable. Our Craighead County elder abuse law firm has represented many nursing home resident victims in cases involving negligence, mistreatment and abuse.

We encourage you to contact our Arkansas elder abuse law office today by calling (888) 424-5757 to schedule your appointment for a full free, no obligation case evaluation. All information you share with our law offices remain confidential. We accept all wrongful death lawsuits, personal injury claims and nursing home abuse cases through contingency fee arrangements, meaning no upfront fees from you are required.

For additional information on Arkansas laws and information on nursing homes look here.

If you are looking for information on a specific facility or an attorney, please see links below to respective locality pages.

Client Reviews

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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
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After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric