Moline Nursing Nursing Home Neglect & Bed Sore

Moline, Illinois Bed Sore Attorneys

Many elderly, disabled and infirmed residents living in nursing facilities are especially vulnerable to developing bedsores if the staff act negligently and does not follow physician’s orders. Without proper treatment based on proven prevention and healing protocols, an unassuming bedsore can degrade quickly into a life-threatening decubitus ulcer. In fact, The Moline nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have seen a significant increase in the number of civil lawsuit cases involving facility acquired bedsores filed against nursing home administrators, management and nursing staff.

Moline Bed Sore

Bedsores (pressure sores; pressure ulcers; decubitus ulcers) are formed through pressure applied to the skin that restricts blood flow, oxygen and nutrients from reaching the area. The lack of circulation causes deterioration to skin and tissue, especially around bony areas of the body including the tailbone, heels, hips and elbows. The restricted circulation causes the area to swell and become red where the resident feels numbness or pain as the surrounding tissue and skin dies. At nearly every stage of degradation, the open wound becomes excruciating. At some point the sore is impossible to heal.

Pressure sores tend to be most common to residents who are bound to a wheelchair or bed ridden and unable to move about to relieve pressure and the restricted blood flow. Basic standards of medical care call for residents being turned or repositioned by nursing staff once every couple of hours to prevent the development of pressure ulcers by relieving pressure. Any failure to do so could be considered negligence.

Moline Nursing Facility Health Concerns

The states of Illinois and Iowa both have strict eldercare laws enacted to provide much-needed protection to nursing home residents from neglect, mistreatment and abuse. Our Moline elder abuse attorneys have provided legal representation to many victims of nursing home neglect and use the full force of state and federal laws to force nursing facilities, hospitals, rehabilitation centers and assisted-living homes to make financial amends to injured residents and improve the level of nursing and hygiene care provided to every resident.

Our Illinois nursing home abuse and neglect lawyers review medical records, filed complaints and opened investigations at nursing facilities throughout the state. We gather this publicly available data from numerous federal and state websites including Medicare.gov. We post the information below to be used as an effective tool by family members facing the unwanted decision of placing a loved one in the hands of caregivers at a public or private nursing facility.

Comparing Moline Area Nursing Facilities

Our Rock Island County nursing home neglect attorneys have reviewed the documents, citations, surveys and investigations of the nursing facilities listed below. We post our results along with primary concerns over the health and well-being of residents suffering injury, harm and preventable bedsores after being admitted to nursing facilities in the county.

Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation

St Anthony’s Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

767 30th Street
Rock Island, IL 61201
(309) 788-7631
A “For-Profit” 130-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure that a Resident Entering the Facility without Pressure Sores Does Not Develop Pressure Sores or Receives Necessary Treatment to Promote Healing

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/26/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “provide the necessary treatment to promote the healing of pressure wounds of [one resident at the facility] review for pressure wounds.”

The notation was made by the state surveyor after a review of the resident’s 05/15/2015 Minimum Data Set (MDS) and the 2015 Medication Review Report as needed. Apply [a heel protector boot] at all times for prevention.” A review of the resident’s 05/04/2015 10:20 PM Admission Orders Packet includes Progress Notes provided by the discharging facility that show that the resident’s “heel wound is half-dollar [in size] altogether but only two centimeters by one centimeter area actually open.”

The state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s Nursing Progress Notes on 06/03/2015 for the resident that documents “Resident has a non-intact blister with the necrotic tissue to the right foot heel. Zero complaints of pain or discomfort. This nurse applied skin prep and non-adherent pad and wrapping with stretching gauze.” However, this record input is the only occasion since the resident was admitted to the facility that documents the wound on the right heel.

The nursing progress notes dated the following day at both 11:00 AM and 2:30 PM indicate that the resident was “sent to a local hospital emergency room, where [the resident] was subsequently admitted to the hospital’s intensive care unit.” The local hospital Wound Nurse documents the resident’s condition indicating “Wound location – right heel present on admission; unstageable pressure ulcer; two centimeters by two centimeters; wound base is black/necrotic; wound edges/margin is white and macerated; and wound drainage is moderate serosanguinous.”

The state surveyor conducted a 06/24/2015 12:50 PM interview with the Administrator and Assistant Director of Nursing at Saint Anthony’s Nursing and Rehabilitation Center where it was revealed that the resident’s “right heel pressure ulcer should not have been missed during [the resident’s] admission to the nursing home; and with 38 years of experience, [the resident’s] right heel pressure wound has been there for some time… this type of wound does not show up overnight.”

Our Rock Island nursing home neglect attorneys recognize it any failure to follow protocols to treat an existing bedsore, this may place the health and well-being of the resident in grave danger. This deficient practice might also be considered negligence or mistreatment because it does not follow the established policies, procedures and protocols adopted by Saint Anthony’s Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation
Rock Island Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

2545 24th Street
Rock Island, IL 61201
(309) 788-0458
Formally Generations at Rock Island
A “For-Profit” 177-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Adequate and Necessary Care to Prevent the Development of a New Pressure Sore and/or Promote the Healing of an Existing Bedsore

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 07/26/2011, a notation was made by a state investigator during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “implement preventative measures including hourly repositioning, protective foot wear and pressure relieving devices in order to promote healing.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted after an initial 07/25/2011 observation of a resident “lying in bed positioned on her back and left side. Both [the resident’s] legs and feet were extremely contracted, with [the resident’s] right foot tucked under [the resident’s] buttocks. [The resident’s] right foot had three scabbed sores on the little toe, middle toe and big toe [and the resident’s] right, big, toenail was approximately one half inch long and jagged.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview with the facility’s Treatment Nurse who stated “that the foot doctor would trim the nail the next time he is scheduled to come to the facility [… and] that [the resident] sometimes refuses care.” Notations in the resident POS, his records indicated that the resident “had the nail trim the last time the foot doctor was in. [The resident] did not have any protective wear underfoot nor did [the resident] have any positioning device between the legs or knees on 07/25/2011 at 11:45 AM.

The state surveyor observed the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) repositioning the resident to “the resident’s right side while in bed. [The resident] was having a bowel movement [and] no dressings were observed on the three wounds on [the resident’s] buttocks and coccyx area. [The CNA] stated that “the resident] did not have dressings on earlier and that they must have come off during incontinence care and when [the CNA] repositioned [the resident] approximately two hours ago.” The CNA also indicated that the resident “is positioned every two hours.” However, when the CNA was questioned about where the resident’s “protective devices were, [the CNA] was not sure [but later] found one of [the resident’s] protective footwear (bootie) under some blankets that were on [the resident’s] roommates chair and the other bootie was on the top shelf rack resident’s] closet.” Additionally, the pillow that the CNA stated that is to be used between the knees and legs of the resident was found “on the chair by the roommates bed. [CNA] stated that she would inform the treatment nurse that [the resident] did not have any dressings on her wounds.”

A review of the resident’s April 2011 admission records indicates that the resident “was admitted with several stage II pressure ulcers and have been receiving treatments to the source since admission. The pressure sores showed increasing in size after [the resident’s] pressure ulcers were debrided by the hospital wound nurse.”

Our Rockford elder abuse attorneys recognize it any failure to follow protocols and procedures when providing care and treatment to residents suffering with bedsores might be considered negligence or mistreatment. Additionally, the deficient practices do not follow the established procedures, protocols and policies adopted by Rock Island Nursing and Rehabilitation Center especially the policy titled: Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol that documents in part:

“Residents assessed as being at high risk for pressure sores will have a plan of care that will include to have daily skin checks, address mobility status and ability to reposition self, use pressure reducing devices, such as pressure reducing mattresses, mattress overlays, wheelchair cushions, if needed.”

Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation
Riverwood Rehabilitation Center

430 South 30th Avenue
East Moline, IL 61244
(309) 755-3466
A “For-Profit” 120-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Provide Necessary Care to Prevent the Development of a New Pressure Sore and/or Promote the Healing of an Existing Bedsore

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 02/10/2016, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “consistently address skin integrity and” a failure to “implement intervention to prevent skin breakdown.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility reviewed for pressure ulcers.

The deficient practice was noted upon review of a resident’s records including their physician order sheets written on 03/09/2015 upon admission to the facility. The physician’s orders included: weekly skin assessment on evening shift, every Wednesday.”

The Resident’s 08/25/2015 Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment documents at the resident has a “moderate risk for skin breakdown.” The resident’s 03/25/2015 current care plan “does not include interventions for skin breakdown.” The resident’s January 2016 Treatment Administration Record is missing staff initials that “document the completion of physician ordered, ‘weekly skin assessment, each Wednesday on evening shift’.”

On 02/09/2015 at 9:50 AM, three Certified Nursing Assistants prepared to bathe the resident in bed. After rolling the resident onto his/her right side, “a stage II pressure ulcer, 0.5 centimeters by 0.2 centimeters was noted on the [resident’s] right inner buttock.”

An hour later, the state surveyor conducted a 10:50 AM interview with the facility’s Assistant Director of Nurses who stated “there are only three pressure ulcers in-house. [The resident] does not have a pressure ulcer.” 15 minutes later, the Assistant Director of Nurses performed a pressure ulcer assessment on the resident where it was noted that a “stage II, 0.5 centimeter by 0.2 centimeters open area was present on the [resident’s] right inner buttock.” In response, the Assistant Director of Nursing stated “I do not know when that happened.”

The state surveyor conducted a 02/10/2016 9:00 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nurses who stated, “I don’t have any additional (pressure ulcer risk assessments) for [the resident]. They (pressure ulcer risk assessments) didn’t get done [and] I don’t see where the nurses performed weekly skin assessments on [the resident and the resident’s] care plan does not address [the resident’s] risk for skin breakdown.”

Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation
Hope Creek Care Center

4343 Kennedy Drive
East Moline, IL 61244
(309) 796-6600
A “For-Profit” 245-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores or Heal Existing Pressure Sores

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/13/2015, a notation was made by a state surveyor during an annual licensure and certification survey involving the facility’s failure to “perform weekly skin assessments in accordance with this policy on [three residents at the facility].”

The deficient practice was noted in part due to a review of a resident’s medical chart, documents and assessments along with a 04/09/2015 1:00 PM observation that the resident “had a dressing on the left knee.” A review of the resident’s 02/05/2015 wound weekly documentation indicates the resident has “a left knee stage II scab 2.0 centimeters by 2.5 centimeters and [on] 02/25/2015 [a stage II left knee scabbed, and 04/02/2015 stage II – I.5 centimeter by 2.0 centimeter.” However, the “sheet documented no wound information from 02/25/2015 to 04/02/2015.”

The state surveyor conducted a 04/13/2015 2:20 PM interview with the facility’s Director of Nurses who stated “I am unable to find more missing weekly skin assessments for [the resident]. The nurses on the floor do the treatments and are to document every week.”

Our East Moline nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that failure to follow protocols might be considered negligence or mistreatment of the resident. The deficient practice fails to follow specific policies adopted by Hope Creek Care Center including the facility’s 06/17/2014 policy titled: Wound Care and Documentation that reads in part:

“Wound assessment documentation will be completed at least weekly and as changes in the wound are apparent.”

Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation
Aspen Rehabilitation and Health Care

1403 9th Avenue
Silvis, IL 61282
(309) 796-2600
A “For-Profit” 63-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols for Treating Pressure Ulcers That Resulted in a Degrading Wound

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/25/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “maintain a dressing over pressure ulcer on two separate occasions.” The deficient practice affected one resident residing at Aspen Rehabilitation and Health Care Center.

The deficient practice was noted in part because of a 06/23/2015 3:25 PM observation of two Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) preparing “to transfer [the resident] from the wheel chair to the bed. Upon completion of the transfer, [one CNA] removed [the resident’s] pants and adult incontinence brief [noting that] a large amount of green, brown liquid stool covered [the resident’s] entire buttocks [and] no pressure ulcer dressing was in place.” The buttocks area of the resident appeared “reddened. Numerous, scattered open areas were present across [the resident’s] buttocks Stage II open area was present on the left buttocks. The pressure area had a yellow center with white edges.” One of the CNA’s “remove the stool and applied a thick paste of incontinence cream over the [resident’s] entire buttocks [when the resident] yelled ‘Ouch, Ouch’ throughout the procedure.”

The state surveyor reviewed the resident’s 06/04/2015 Nursing Admission Assessment documenting that the resident had a “2.5 centimeter by 2.5 centimeter open area present to the top of the [resident’s hospice] left buttocks and a 2.0 centimeter by 1.5 centimeter open area present to the bottom of the [resident’ is] buttocks.

The state surveyor reviewed the June 2015 Physician Order Sheet which states “cleanse wound to left buttocks with soap and [water], pat dry, apply (calcium compound wound pad) and cover with an island dressing, daily until healed.” Additionally, a 06/24/2015 11:00 AM interview with the facility’s Director of Nurses “confirmed addressing should be in place at all times to [the resident’s] buttocks.

Our East Moline nursing home neglect attorneys recognize and any failure to provide necessary treatment for residents suffering with pressure sores according to physician’s orders might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it could cause additional harm or injury. Also, the deficient practice does not follow the established policies adopted by the facility, especially the facility’s May 2007 revised policy titled: Decubitus Care/Pressure Areas that reads in part:

“Notify the physician for treatment orders. The physician’s order should include: type of treatment, frequency treatment is to be performed, how to cleanse, if needed, site of application.”

Preventing Bedsores from Developing

Prevention is the key to ensure that a loved one does not develop a bedsore after being admitted to a nursing facility. However, prevention requires changing body position at least one time every two hours. To provide successful prevention, the nursing staff must develop, implement and enforce a turning schedule within a timeframe that skin and tissue can tolerate acceptable levels of pressure without causing damage. In addition, the care plan often includes the need of devices that alleviate pressure from the body including air mattresses, lifting devices, boots and other equipment designed specifically to help protect against tissue abrasion and shearing.

Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation

If the nursing home resident develops a bedsore, immediate action is required. The area must be routinely cleaned and dead tissue removed. In addition, the nursing staff must provide the resident increased nutrition and hydration to ensure proper healing. Deep wounds often require surgical debridement for removal of necrotic (dead) tissue. Without implementing every element to help promote healing of an open wound, the pressure ulcer will likely never heal but in fact, quickly worsen, become infected and cause severe pain. In some cases, catastrophic results of ineffective care or lack of treatment leads to the resident’s death.

Contacting an Attorney Immediately When You Learn About Pressure Sores

Serving as your loved one’s advocate is crucial to ensure they do not develop a bedsore while residing in a nursing facility. This is because bedsores, pressure sores and decubitus ulcers are life-threatening events that must have immediate intervention. Because of that, many family members will consider contacting an attorney to serve as a legal advocate to stop the neglect. A skilled personal injury attorney specializes in nursing home neglect can provide various legal options that ensure the loved one receives immediate medical attention from qualified, competent medical professionals who specialize in life-threatening decubitus ulcers.

The Moline nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC can assist you in navigating through the legal layers of bureaucracy. Our Illinois team of dedicated experienced attorneys handles cases involving neglect occurring in nursing homes throughout Rock Island County.

We urge you to contact our Illinois elder abuse law office at (888) 424-5757. Schedule your appointment today to speak with one of our experienced lawyers for your free full case review. All information you share with our law offices remains confidential. We accept all personal injury, nursing home neglect and wrongful death cases using contingency fee agreements. This means all of our legal fees are paid only after we win your case at trial or negotiate your acceptable out of court settlement. You can take comfort in the fact that we have successfully prosecuted other pressure cases on behalf of families and individuals before. See some of our verdicts and settlement here. For a discussion of bed sore case valuation in Illinois look here.

Should you have questions about Illinois law related to pressure sores, view our page here.

For information on bed sores and nursing home negligence in other Illinois cities, please review the pages below:

  • Aurora Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Bloomington Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Cicero Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Champaign Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Chicago Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Joliet Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Naperville Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Orland Park Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Peoria Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Rockford Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Schaumburg Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Springfield Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Urbana Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
  • Waukegan Elder Abuse & Pressure Ulcer Attorneys
Call (888) 424-5757 Toll-Free for a No Obligation Consultation
Client Reviews
★★★★★
Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric