Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing Center Abuse and Neglect Attorneys

Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing CenterIf caregivers or other residents at the nursing facility victimized your loved one, you are likely feeling overwhelmed knowing that they have been mistreated, neglected or abused. The Tennessee Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys have represented many nursing home victims in Madison County and recovered millions in jury verdicts and negotiated out-of-court settlements on behalf of our clients.

Our legal team understands that the nursing home staff and Administrator are responsible for providing your loved one care, shelter and food in a safe, compassionate environment. When the home fails to provide the highest level of care and services, they should be held legally and financially accountable for their inappropriate action. Speak with us today about how we can help your family obtain the financial compensation you deserve.

Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing Center

a.k.a. Creekside Center

This long-term care (LTC) facility is a "for profit" 139-certified bed long-term care center providing cares and services to residents of Madison and Madison County, Tennessee. The Medicare/Medicaid-participating home is located at:

306 W Due West Avenue
Madison, Tennessee, 37115
(615) 612-4499
Fined $812,582 for substandard care
Financial Penalties and Violations

Both Tennessee and the federal government can impose monetary fines or deny payments through Medicare when a nursing facility has been found to violate established regulations and rules. The higher the monetary fine, the more serious the violation is that likely harmed or could have harmed one or more residents at the nursing home.

Within the last three years, state and federal regulators have fined Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing Center on two occasions including on June 16, 2016, for $766,774 and on April 1, 2016, for $45,808 for a massive total of $812,582. Also, Medicare denied payment for services rendered on June 16, 2016.

The nursing facility received nine formally filed complaints and self-reported two serious problems that resulted in citations. Additional information about fines and penalties can be found on the Tennessee Department of Health Nursing Home Reporting Website concerning this nursing facility.

Madison Tennessee Nursing Home Patients Safety Concerns One Star Rating

A list of dangerous hazards, opened investigations, health violations, safety concerns, filed complaints, and incident inquiries on statewide long-term care homes can be reviewed on the Tennessee Department of Public Health site and Medicare.gov. Many families use this data to determine the best facility to place a loved one who requires the highest level of hygiene assistance and skilled health care.

According to Medicare, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including one out of five stars concerning health inspections, three out of five stars for staffing issues and two out of five stars for quality measures. The Madison County neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center have found serious deficiencies and safety concerns at Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing Center that include:

  • Failure to Immediately Notify the Resident, the Resident’s Doctor or Family Members of a Change in the Resident’s Condition Including a Decline in Their Health or Injury
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 24, 2016, the state surveyors documented the facility’s failure to “notify the physician of residents with blood glucose [levels] greater than 400.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved five of twelve residents “reviewed for diabetes mellitus.

    These failures placed all diabetic residents in “Immediate Jeopardy (a situation in which the provider’s noncompliance with one or more requirements of participation has caused, or is likely to cause, serious injury, harm, impairment, or death of a resident.” The investigators reviewed the facility policy titled: Change in Resident’s Condition or Status and the facility policy titled: Diabetes, Nursing Care of the Adult Diabetes Mellitus Resident that read in part:

    “To ensure the proper and timely reporting and documentation of any changes in the resident’s condition or status, nursing services will notify the resident’s attending physician.”

    This notification will occur “when there is a significant change in the resident’s physical, mental or psychosocial status, there is a need to alter the resident’s treatment deemed necessary or appropriate in the best interest of the resident.”

    “The physician should be notified when the blood sugar falls above his/her specific blood sugar range or above 400 mg/dL.”

    The investigators say that the “Medical Director of the facility is the physician of record for all residents.” One incident involved a resident’s medical records that revealed finger stick blood sugar results ranging from 401 milligrams per deciliter on the low end to 591 mg/dL between June 4 and June 18. During these events, there was no “notification of the Medical Doctor or Nurse Practitioner regarding the elevated blood sugars.”

    A review of the resident’s medical records found in the June 2016 Medication Administration Record (MAR) showed blood glucose finger stick test results from June 1 through June 31 ranging from 405 to 564 milligrams per deciliter. However, a review of the medical records “revealed no notification of the Medical Doctor or Nurse Practitioner regarding the elevated blood sugars.” This pattern of high blood sugar levels and no notification to the Nurse Practitioner or Medical Doctor continued through August and September 2016.

    The investigative team interviewed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) during a telephone call. The LPN said, “I did not call the doctor when the sugar was 560 on September 23, 2016. A separate LPN confirmed that the resident’s “blood sugar was [exceptionally high and out of range] and she failed to notify the physician.”

    The facility Director Nursing stated that “the facility policy was to notify the physician if blood sugar was less than 60 or greater than 400.” The Director also “confirmed the facility failed to follow the policy and notify the physician of the elevated blood sugar levels for the resident.”

  • Failure to Provide and Implement an Infection Protection and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated May 16, 2018, a state investigator noted the nursing home's failure to “establish and maintain an infection prevention and control program designed to provide a safe, sanitary, and comfortable environment.”

    The surveyors also said that the nursing staff failed to “help prevent the development and transmission of communicable diseases and infections related to washbasins sitting on the bathroom floor unbagged for six of twenty-four residents reviewed on the Ingle Brook Way.”

    The investigators reviewed the facility policy titled: Infection Control – General Policies and Procedures dated October 20, 2016, that reads in part:

    “Develop prevention, surveillance, and control measures to protect residents and personnel from healthcare-associated infection.”

    The survey team observed numerous residents’ bathrooms on the morning of May 14, 2018, and again in the afternoon. The observation revealed a “wash basin sitting on the bathroom floor unbagged.” As a result, the investigators interviewed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) providing the resident care who confirmed that “the washbasin should be bagged and stored in the residents’ bathrooms and not on the floor.” The LPN also “confirmed that the facility failed to maintain a sanitary environment.”

  • Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 31, 2017, the state investigators documented a facility failure. This deficiency involved a failure to “maintain an environment free of accident hazards for one of five handrails … between the first and second floors and used by the majority of residents in the facility.” The investigative team reviewed the facility’s policy titled: TELS (computerized equipment maintenance audit process) that reads in part:

    “At least once a month, or more often as required, check work orders to ensure deficiencies are being identified and addressed. On a weekly basis, the Administrator should sit down with the Maintenance Director to review upcoming maintenance and list safety tasks for the week, month and quarter.”

    The survey team observed a corridor on the morning of October 30, 2017 “between the first and second floors [that] revealed the handrail leading up the inside corridor just past the exit door on the right, under the fire pull,had a chip in the would with an exposed nail had protruding from the damaged rail.”

    During an interview with an LPN, it was revealed that the “residents do use the walkway, but most of our residents are assisted by the staff when they go up and down the walkway.” The investigators then interviewed the Maintenance Director who confirmed that “the handrail was chipped and a nail was protruding out of the damaged rail [and confirmed that] the facility failed to maintain an environment free of accident hazards.”

  • In a separate summary statement of deficiencies, the state investigators noted that the nursing home had failed to “ensure the facility corridors were equipped with firmly secured handrails for one of five handrails in the corridor between the first and second facility levels and used by the majority of the residents in the facility.”
  • During an interview with the facility Maintenance Director, it was confirmed that “the last section of the handrail along the right lower portion of the corridor coming from the second level down to the first level was loose.” The Maintenance Director also confirmed that “the facility failed to ensure the facility corridors are equipped with firmly secured handrails.”

  • Failure to Write and Use Policies That Forbid Mistreatment, Neglect or Abuse of Residents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 24, 2016, the state survey team noted that the facility had failed to “prevent resident neglect when it failed to complete blood glucose monitoring at specific times.” The nursing home also failed to “administer insulin at scheduled times and failed to administer cardiac, blood pressure and [other] medications within the scheduled time frame.”

    Failure to follow policies and forbid mistreatment, abuse and neglect – TN State Inspector

    The investigators documented the facility’s failure to “notify the physician of abnormal blood glucose values and failed to follow physician’s orders to recheck blood glucose after abnormal values were found.” It was noted that the nursing home had failed to “document interventions for twelve residents reviewed for medications. These failures placed all diabetic residents in Immediate Jeopardy.”

  • Failure to Ensure Services Provided by the Nursing Facility Meet Professional Standards of Quality
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 24, 2016, the surveyors noted the facility had “failed to meet professional standards to administer medications properly in a timely fashion.” The nursing home also failed to “communicate a significant change in a resident’s condition to the appropriate professional and to implement a physician’s Advanced Nurse Practitioner’s or Physician’s Assistant’s order in a timely fashion.”

    The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved a failure to “complete blood glucose testing as ordered by the physician” for nine residents reviewed for diabetic conditions. The nursing facility also failed to “administer insulin per physician’s orders for seven residents receiving insulin and failed to administer cardiac blood glucose medications as ordered by the physician for three residents.”

    The surveyors also documented that the nursing home had “failed to administer antidepressant and antianxiety medications as ordered by the physician for three residents;” and “failed to follow guidelines for care of a resident with a wound vac.”

    These failures by the nursing staff “placed all residents in Immediate Jeopardy (a situation in which the provider’s noncompliance with one or more requirements of participation has caused, or is likely to cause, serious injury, harm, impairment, or death of a resident.” During an interview with the Director of Nursing, it was confirmed that the “facility failed to follow physician’s orders.”

Are You the Victim of Abuse and Neglect at Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing Center? Let Us Help

If your family believes your loved one suffered harm while living at Madison Pointe Center for Rehabilitation and Healing Center, contact the Tennessee nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 now. Our network of attorneys fights aggressively on behalf of Madison County victims of mistreatment living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Madison.

Our skilled attorneys can file and successfully resolve your victim case involving nursing home abuse or neglect and hold those that caused your loved one harm financially accountable. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim. We can start working on your behalf today to ensure your rights are protected.

We accept all cases of wrongful death, nursing home abuse, and personal injury through a contingency fee arrangement. This agreement postpones your payment for our legal services until after we have successfully resolved your case through a jury trial award or a negotiated settlement. We can begin representing you in your case today to ensure you receive adequate compensation for your damages. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

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Client Reviews
★★★★★
Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric