Information & Ratings on Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Healthcare, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Attorneys for Injured & Neglected Residents at Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Healthcare

Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and HealthcareNursing home neglect and abuse are widespread problems that are often devastating to the victim and family members who have placed their loved one in a facility to receive the best care. In many cases, the nursing staff is inadequately trained or lacks sufficient supervision to ensure that policies and procedures are always being followed. In many cases, the victim is neglected by caregivers or abused by other residents through physical, mental or sexual assault. The Pennsylvania Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys have represented many nursing home victims and Allegheny County to ensure that those responsible for their harm are held legally accountable. We can help your family too. Let us begin working on your case today to ensure you receive financial compensation to recover your monetary damages.

Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Healthcare

This Nursing Home is a Medicare/Medicaid-participating “for-profit” Center providing cares and services to residents of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The 187-certified bed Nursing Facility is located at:

6655 Frankstown Avenue
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15206
(412) 665-3232

In addition to providing around-the-clock skilled nursing care, the facility also offers:

  • Short-term rehabilitation care
  • Amputee care
  • Long-term
Financial Penalties and Violations One Star Rating
Fined $4428 on July 30, 2016 and received 46 complaints for Substandard Care

Both the federal government and the state of Pennsylvania can impose monetary fines or deny payments through Medicare of any nursing facility that has been found to have violated the established nursing home rules and regulations. Within the last three years, state and federal nursing home regulatory agencies have fined Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Health Care once for $4428 on July 30, 2016. Also, the facility has received 46 formally filed complaints from residents and family members. Additional documentation about penalties and fines can be found on the Pennsylvania Department of Public Health posted surveys website concerning this nursing facility.

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Nursing Home Residents Safety Concerns

Comprehensive research results can be reviewed on the Medicare.gov and Pennsylvania Department of Public Health nursing home database websites that details all dangerous hazards, safety concerns, health violations, incident inquiries, opened investigations, and filed complaints. Many families use this information to determine the level of healthcare and hygiene assistance the long-term care facilities in the local community provide their residents.

According to Medicare, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including one out of five stars concerning health inspections, three out of five stars for staffing issues and four out of five stars for quality measures. The Allegheny County neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center have found serious deficiencies and safety concerns at Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Healthcare that include:

“Failed to prevent involuntary seclusion for a resident on a secured unit - PA State Inspector
  • Failure to Timely Report Suspected Abuse, Neglect or Theft or Report the Results of the Investigation to Proper Authorities
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 30, 2018, a state surveyor documented the facility’s failure to “notify the appropriate State Agency of an incident of serious bodily injury as required for [one resident].” The investigator reviewed the Incident that was “submitted to the State Survey Agency” indicating that the resident “sustained complete fractures of the distal tibia and fibula (both bones of the lower leg) above the ankle joint.” The investigator interviewed the Director of Nurses who “confirmed that the facility had not contacted other appropriate State Agency to report this incident of serious bodily injury as required.”

  • Failure to Protect Each Resident from Separation from Other Residents, Their Room, or Confined to Their Room
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 30, 2018, a state surveyor noted the facility’s failure to “prevent involuntary seclusion for [one resident] on a secured unit.” The investigator reviewed the resident’s physician’s orders that ordered: “activities as tolerated and had no orders for confinement, restriction or a secured nursing unit.”

    The investigator reviewed the resident’s Admission Wandering/Elopement Assessment that showed that the resident “was not exhibiting any exit-seeking behaviors. A review of the elopement risk assessment dated January 30, 2018, indicated that “the resident] had an elopement risk factor five [which show that the resident] is, not a risk of the elopement.”

    The state investigator observed a resident on March 26, 2018 “walking in the hall on the third-floor nursing unit, which is secured with keypads at the elevator and door to prevent egress (leaving) and requires access codes.” The resident “requested to talk with the surveyor and displayed no inclination of leaving the unit.” During the interview the resident “indicated that this is a locked unit, ‘I want more freedom, it is like a prison here.’”

    The investigator reviewed the resident’s records that indicated that the resident “should be encouraged to participate in recreational activities to promote well-being.” During the observation, the surveyor “did not have the access code to a locked door on the third-floor nursing unit.” The resident “was sitting near the door and indicated there was a red button about 6 feet from the door, [saying] ‘push that and the door” will open.’” The resident indicated that they were “not allowed to push the button to escape but was capable of reaching it.”

    During a subsequent observation the following day, the resident “was near the elevator when the door open.” The resident “was told by staff who was assisting residents to an activity that [they were] not allowed to leave the unit.” The investigator interviewed the Director of Nurses who “confirmed that the physician’s orders, plan of care and the clinical record had no documentation to support keeping [the resident] on a secured unit that restricted the resident from moving about the facility.”

  • Failure to Keep Each Resident Free from Physical Restraints Unless Needed for Medical Treatment
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, a state agency investigator noted that the nursing home had failed to “obtain physician’s orders for the use of physical restraint.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved one resident at the facility.

    “Failed to obtain physician’s orders for the use of a physical restraint - PA State Inspector

    The investigator reviewed the facility’s policy titled Physical Restraints dated March 15, 2017, that reads in part:

    “Restraint devices should only be used when medically indicated, and an order will be obtained from the physician.”

    The investigator reviewed a resident’s admission records and observed the resident “on the fourth floor while having “hand mittens on both hands.” The investigator documented that the “clinical record did not include a physician’s orders for [the restraint].” During an interview with the Registered Nurse providing the resident care, it was “confirmed that the resident did not have a physician’s orders for [the use of] a restraint.

  • Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce Policies That Ensure Residents are Free of Mistreatment, Abuse or Neglect
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, a state agency investigator documented the facility’s failure to “provide Abuse Protection training for [one] newly hired employee.” The investigator reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation of Residents dated July 22, 2016, that reads in part:

    “Comprehensive policies and procedures have been developed to aid the facility in the prevention of abuse, neglect, exploitation, mistreatment or misappropriation of property of the residents. The facility will provide Abuse Prohibition to all new employees.”

    However, after reviewing the facility’s personnel files, it was revealed that “the facility failed to provide Abuse Protection training for [a Dietary Aide] hired on February 22, 2017. As of June 15, 2017, the facility permitted [the Dietary Aide] to provide resident care and failed to provide Abuse Protection training to the [Dietary Aide].” The investigator interviewed the Nursing Home Administrator who “confirmed that the facility failed to provide Abuse Protection training for [that employee].”

  • Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce Programs That Investigate, Control and Keep Infections from Spreading
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, a state investigator documented the nursing home’s failure to “exercise proper infection control during medication passes for [two of nine residents].” The investigator also documented the facility’s failure “to prevent potential contamination of four cases of feeding solution.” As a part of the investigation, the survey team reviewed the facility policy titled Handwashing dated July 22, 2016, that reads in part:

    “Hands are to be washed before putting on gloves and after the removal of gloves.”

    The surveyor conducted a medication administration observation of a resident receiving their drug on June 13, 2017, by a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). The LPN “with gloved hands, obtained liquid oral pain medication in the syringe, then set the oral syringe on top of the medication cart.” The LPN went to the resident’s “room, setting the medication box on the overbed table and administered the oral medication [while] setting syringe on the overbed table. Then with the same glove hands, readjusted and covered [the resident] in her bed, then picked up the syringe and medication box exiting the room setting them on top of the medication cart.”

    At that point, the LPN “removed gloves, retrieved keys from her pocket and returned the unclean syringe and medication box to the medication cart.” The LPN then “continued to document in the care record for [the resident].”

    The LPN then went to another resident’s room to administer medication while “still failing to perform hand hygiene.” The investigator interviewed the LPN who “confirmed that proper infection control practices were not maintained during the medication pass by setting the oral medication syringe on the box, overbed table and by failing to perform hand washing when gloves were removed, changing tasks and before contact with another resident.”

  • Failure to Provide, Implement and Enforce an Infection Prevention and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 30, 2018, a state surveyor noted the facility's failure to "make certain that staff performs hand hygiene during medication administration, implement infection transmission precautions related to dressing change.” The investigator also documented the facility’s failure “to follow acceptable infection control practices related to handling and transporting linens.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved three residents at the facility.

    The investigator reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Infection Control Guidelines for All Nursing Procedures: Hand Hygiene and the policy titled: Dressing Change: Clean, both dated July 19, 2017, that read in part:

    “Staff will perform hand hygiene frequently, including before and after all resident contact, contact with the potentially infectious material and before putting on or upon removal of personal protective equipment [PPE], including gloves.” “After removing the soiled dressing, the staff should place the dressing and the gloves in a plastic bag and should be discarded in the soiled utility room.”

    The investigator documented that the “policy also notes that a dressing saturated with blood should be placed in a bio-hazardous bag and be discarded in the bio-hazard container in the soiled the facility room.”

    The investigator observed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) on a medication pass “putting on gloves to administer gastric tube medications to [a resident] that failed to perform hand hygiene before and after donning and removing gloves.” As a part of the observation, the LPN “failed to perform hand hygiene [before] administering oral medication to [another resident].” The investigator interviewed the LPN who “confirmed that she failed to perform hand hygiene before and after administering medications.”

    In a separate incident, a Registered Nurse was observed removing “the old soiled wound packing and dressing from [a resident’s] coccyx wound and laid it briefly on the resident’s bed [before] putting it in a plastic bag.” The Registered Nurse “then discarded the soiled dressing and supplies into [the resident’s] waste can.” The investigator interviewed the Registered Nurse who “confirmed that she failed to discard the soiled dressing and supplies in the soiled utility room as required.”

Was Your Loved One Abused at Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Healthcare?

If you believe your loved one suffered harm while a resident at Forbes Center For Rehabilitation and Healthcare, contact the Pennsylvania nursing home abuse lawyers at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 now. Our law firm fights aggressively on behalf of Allegheny County victims of mistreatment living in long-term centers including nursing homes in Pittsburgh. Our abuse and mistreatment injury attorneys represent victims injured by neglect of the nursing staff. Our law firm working on your behalf can ensure your family receives adequate financial recompense for the injuries, harm, losses, and damages your loved one has endured by others. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim. Let us fight aggressively on your behalf to ensure your rights are protected.

We accept all cases of wrongful death, nursing home abuse, and personal injury through a contingency fee agreement. This arrangement postpones the need to pay for legal services until after we have resolved your case through a negotiated out of court settlement or jury trial award. We offer every client a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee. This guarantee ensures that you will owe us nothing if we cannot obtain compensation on your behalf. Let our attorneys begin working on your claim today to ensure your family receives adequate compensation from those who caused your harm. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

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