Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center Abuse and Neglect Attorneys

Douglas Health and Rehabilitation CenterWas your loved one neglected or abused at the hands of their caregivers or other residents? If so, the Tennessee Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys can help your family seek justice and obtain monetary recovery to restore your losses.

Let our legal team begin working on your case today. We have helped countless victims in Gibson County by using our experience and skills to resolve their compensation claims. We can begin working on your case now to ensure your family gets on the right track for health and financial recovery.

Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center

This Medicare/Medicaid-approved long-term care (LTC) center is a "for profit" 72-certified bed home providing cares to residents of Milan and Gibson County, Tennessee. The facility is located at:

2084 W Main Street
Milan, Tennessee, 38358
(731) 686-8321

In addition to providing around-the-clock skilled nursing care, Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center also offers:

  • Multidisciplinary therapies
  • Wound care
  • Orthopedic rehabilitative services
  • Post-surgical rehabilitation
  • Cardiac rehabilitation
  • IV (intravenous) therapy
  • Transitional care
Financial Penalties and Violations

Federal agencies and the State of Tennessee have a legal responsibility to monitor every nursing facility. If serious violations are identified, the government can impose monetary fines or deny payments through Medicare if the resident was harmed or could have been harmed by the deficiency.

Neither the state nor federal nursing home regulatory agencies have fined Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center within the last three years. Additional documentation about fines and penalties can be found on the Tennessee Department of Health Nursing Home Reporting Website concerning this nursing facility.

Failure to follow protocols to prevent the spread of infection – TN State Inspector
Milan Tennessee Nursing Home Residents Safety Concerns One Star Rating

Information on every intermediate and long-term care home in the state can be reviewed on government-owned and operated database websites including the Tennessee Department of Public Health and Medicare.gov. These regulatory agencies routinely update the comprehensive list of health violations, safety concerns, incident inquiries, opened investigations, filed complaints, and dangerous hazards on facilities statewide.

According to Medicare, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including two out of five stars concerning health inspections, one out of five stars for staffing issues and three out of five stars for quality measures. The Gibson County neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center have found serious deficiencies and safety concerns at Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center that include:

  • Failure to Provide and Implement an Infection Protection and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies, a state survey team noted the nursing home's failure to “ensure proper infection control measures were followed to prevent the potential spread of infection during medication administration.” The surveyor’s reviewed the facility policy titled: Handwashing/Hand Hygiene that reads in part: “Handwashing must be performed before and after direct contact with residents [and after removing gloves.”

    The investigators observed a medication administration on the 400 Hall on August 22, 2017, that revealed a Licensed Practical Nurse preparing “medications for a resident without washing her hands.” The LPN “donned gloves, removed the gloves, and handled the resident’s medications with her bare hands without washing her hands.”

    The LPN then enter the resident’s “room with one glove on the left hand, administered the medications, removed the glove and did not wash her hands.” The LPN then “went back to the medication cart and started preparing medications for the next resident without washing her hands.”

    Observations were made of a second LPN “during medication administration on the 400 Hall on August 23, 2017,” when the LPN “was preparing medications for the resident, licking his fingers in between turning the pages of the Medication Administration Record (MAR) without washing hands before, during or after medication administration.”

    The investigators interviewed the Assistant Director of Nursing who confirmed that nurses should wash hands during medication administration “before and after, and any time in between, if necessary.” The Assistant Director also confirmed that a nurse should “wash their hands before administering medications” if they licked their fingers in between turning the pages of the MAR.

  • A separate observation was made of a different resident when an LPN was disconnecting the Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastronomy (PEG) to “and placed the tubing over the rail touching the resident’s shorts. After administering the medications through the PEG, [the LPN] took the syringe and placed it in a plastic bag without rinsing the syringe.”
  • The investigators interviewed the Assistant Director of Nursing who confirmed that the PEG tube should be hung up on the pole after disconnecting it from the PEG. The assistant also confirmed that “the syringe should be washed out and returned to the plastic bag” after administering medication through a PEG.

    The LPN stated during an interview “can I tell you what I did wrong yesterday with the medication pass? I know two things I did not do. I told you yesterday that I did not put a towel down and I should have rinsed the syringe when I finished.”

  • In a third summary statement of deficiencies dated August 29, 2018, the state survey team documented the facility’s failure to “ensure practices to prevent the spread of infection were followed when three of four Licensed Practical Nurses “failed to perform proper hand hygiene during medication administration.”
  • The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved one Registered Nurse (RN) who “failed to properly clean the glucometer (capillary-blood sampling machine used for blood sugar glucose testing).” Additionally, a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) “failed to cleanse the nebulizer (breathing machine) after medication administration.”

  • In a fourth summary statement of deficiencies dated June 2, 2016, the state survey team documented that the nursing home had “failed to ensure three of four [Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)] nurses washed their hands between glove use.” The surveyors also documented that the nursing home had “failed to ensure infection control practices were maintained as evidenced by unpackaged gauze roll dressings in one of two (Station 2 Treatment Cart) treatment carts.”
  • The home failed to ensure “supplies were not left on the floor and a failure to ensure the resident’s indwelling urinary catheter bag did not touch the floor.” The survey team also documented the facility’s failure “to ensure employees were free from communicable diseases.”

    During this investigation, the surveyors observed a resident’s room on the morning of March 31, 2016. The surveyors say an LPN put on gloves, “put the enteral feeding machine on hold, removed gloves, pulled the privacy curtain, applied new gloves, cleaned the stethoscope, removed gloves, donned a clean gloves, checked placement of the feeding tube, administered medications via the feeding tube and remove the gloves.” The surveyors noted that the LPN “did not perform hand hygiene between donning and removing gloves.”

    The survey team then observed a different resident’s room where the same LPN put on gloves, “administered the inhaler, removed gloves, and applied new gloves, without performing hand hygiene.” The LPN then “applied clean gloves, administered another inhaler, removed gloves, and applied new gloves, without performing hand hygiene.”

    A different LPN was then observed in a different resident’s room putting on gloves and then “performed an ‘accucheck’ on [the resident], removed gloves, applied new gloves, discarded used supplies, removed gloves, donned new gloves, and cleaned the glucometer.” However, the LPN “did not perform hand hygiene between removing and donning gloves.”

    The investigators interviewed the facility Director of Nursing who confirmed that nurses should wash their hands “before and after applying gloves.” Further problems were identified with other Licensed Practical Nurses and the Wound Care Nurse that were confirmed by the Director of Nursing and Assistant Director of Nursing.

  • Failure to Properly Hold, Secure and Manage Each Resident’s Personal Money Which Is Deposited with the Nursing Home
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 2, 2016, the state investigative team documented that the nursing home had failed to “ensure residents’ receiving Medicaid funding balances did not exceed the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) limit for [one of fifty-two] residents accounts reviewed” during the survey.

    The survey team interviewed the Business Office Manager on June 1, 2016, and asked about one resident’s “trust account balance if was over $2000 for the month of February, March, and other months during the year? The Business Office Manager replied “I knew she [the resident] would come up. I knew she was over” the legally allowed limit. The Business Office Manager confirmed that the resident should not “have a balance in her patient trust account over $2000.” A review of the resident’s account balances as of April 30, 2016, showed:

    • A balance of $2954.01 on February 29, 2016
    • A balance of $2940.33 on March 31, 2016
    • A balance of $2961.62 on April 30, 2016
  • Failure to Keep a Resident’s Personal Medical Records Private and Confidential
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 2, 2016, the investigative team documented that the facility had failed to “ensure resident clinical information was protected for two of fifty-four residents” at the facility during the survey. The investigators reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Quality of Life – Dignity that reads in part:

    “Confidentiality of Clinical Information – Staff shall maintain an environment in which confidential clinical information is protected.”

    The survey team observed a resident’s room on March 31, 2016, that revealed and opened Medication Administration Record (MAR) that was available and visible to the public, which is against state and federal nursing home regulations. Interviews were conducted with the Director of Nursing who confirmed that Medication Administration Records should not be open and visible to the public if medicines are showing.

  • Failure to Ensure That a Resident Receives Proper Services to Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 2, 2016, the state survey team noted that the facility had failed to “ensure the resident’s indwelling urinary catheter bag did not touch the floor.” The investigators also documented the facility had “failed to notify the physician timely of lab results.” This deficient practice involved two of three residents “reviewed with an indwelling urinary catheter. The survey team reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Catheter Care – Urinary that reads: Be sure the catheter tubing and drainage bag are kept off the floor.”

    The survey team observed a resident’s room on the morning of June 2, 2016, on two separate occasions that revealed that the resident was “in bed on his back with pillows propped under his head. The Foley catheter bag was sitting on the floor and the tubing was cloudy.” As a part of the investigation, the surveyors interviewed the Director of Nursing who confirmed that it was unacceptable “for Foley catheter bags to be sitting on the floor.”

  • Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 2, 2016, the state survey investigators noted that the nursing home had failed to “ensure the environment was safe as evidenced by unsecured chemicals at the bedside for one of fifty-four residents.” The investigators reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Storage of Supplies and Equipment that reads in part: “Hazardous [and] toxic materials must be stored.”

    The state investigators observed a resident’s room and saw “a can of air freshener sitting on the overbed table next to the breakfast tray” once at 8:15 AM and again at 4:15 PM on May 31, 2016, and at 7:42 AM on the following day. The investigators interviewed the Director of Nursing who confirmed that it is unacceptable “to have air freshener stored at the bedside.”

A Victim of Neglect at Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center? We Can Help

If you believe your loved one has been harmed or injured while a resident at Douglas Health and Rehabilitation Center, call the Tennessee nursing home abuse and neglect lawyers at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 now. Our network of attorneys fights aggressively on behalf of Gibson County victims of mistreatment living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Milan.

For years, our attorneys have successfully resolved nursing home abuse cases just like yours. Our experience can ensure a positive outcome in your claim for compensation against those that caused your loved one harm. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim. We can start working on your behalf to ensure your rights are protected.

Our attorneys accept every case concerning wrongful death, personal injury and nursing home abuse through a contingency fee agreement. This arrangement postpones the need to pay for legal services until after we have resolved your case through a negotiated out of court settlement or jury trial award. We provide all clients a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee, meaning you owe us nothing if we are unable to obtain compensation on your behalf. We can provide legal representation starting today to ensure your family is adequately compensated for your damages. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

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Client Reviews
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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric