Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center Abuse and Neglect Attorneys

Dickson Health and RehabAre you responsible for protecting your loved one from neglect or abuse while they reside in a nursing facility? Have you become concerned that they are being mistreated? If so, the Tennessee Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys can provide immediate legal intervention. Time is of the essence to change their situation.

Our team of lawyers has aided many families in Dickson County whose loved one suffered at the hands of caregivers or other residents and were severely injured or died unexpectedly. Contact us now to ensure that your loved one starts living a life of dignity and respect and those at fault for causing their harm are held legally accountable. We can begin working on your case now to ensure your financial compensation.

Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center

This Medicare/Medicaid-approved long-term care (LTC) center is a 70-certified bed "for profit" Home providing services to residents of Dickson and Dickson County, Tennessee. The facility is located at:

901 N. Charlotte
Dickson, Tennessee, 37055
(615) 446-5171

In addition to providing 24/7 skilled nursing care, Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center offers:

  • Short stay/transitional care
  • Pulmonary management care
  • Cardiac management care
  • Orthopedic care
  • Intravenous (IV) therapy
  • Wound care
  • Hospice care
  • Respite care
  • Rehabilitative therapy’s including physical, occupational and speech-language therapy
Financial Penalties and Violations

Federal government nursing home regulatory agencies have the legal authority to penalize any nursing home with a denied payment for Medicare services or monetary fine when the facility has been cited for serious violations of regulations and rules.

Within the last three years, the government has not impose any monetary fines against Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center. However, the nursing facility did receive three formally filed complaints due to substandard care. Additional documentation about fines and penalties can be found on the Tennessee Department of Health Nursing Home Reporting Website concerning this nursing facility.

Failure to follow protocols to prevent the spread of infection – TN State Inspector
Dickson Tennessee Nursing Home Residents Safety Concerns One Star Rating

The state of Tennessee regularly updates their long-term care home database system with complete details of all dangerous hazards, safety concerns, health violations, incident inquiries, opened investigations, and filed complaints. The search results can be found on numerous online sites including the TN Department of Public Health and Medicare.gov.

According to Medicare, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including two out of five stars concerning health inspections, one out of five stars for staffing issues and two out of five stars for quality measures. The Dickson County neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center have found serious deficiencies and safety concerns at Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center that include:

  • Failure to Provide and Implement an Infection Protection and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 11, 2017, a state investigator noted the nursing home's failure to “ensure practices to prevent the potential spread of infection were maintained by failing to ensure isolation signage on the doors of three of six residents sampled for review in isolation.” The surveyor said that one of eight Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) staff members “failed to wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for a [resident] in isolation.” Also, one of six Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) staff nurses “failed to ensure practices to prevent the potential spread of infection were maintained during medication pass observations.”

    The investigators interviewed the facility Director of Nursing who confirmed that it is expected of the nurses when changing gloves that they wash hands “between administering eyedrops, nasal spray, and inhaler.”

  • Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 11, 2017, the state investigators documented that the nursing home had failed to “ensure the environment was free from accident hazards of unsecured razors in one of three (East Common Shower Room) common shower rooms and chemicals in one of thirty-five residents’ rooms.”

    The survey team observed the East Hall common shower room on October 9, 2017, at multiple times that “revealed an unlocked shower room with a razor in a locked cabinet.” The surveyors interviewed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) who was “shown the unlocked shower door and the cabinet and was asked if the shower doors were supposed to remain locked at all times.” The LPN replied, “Yes.” The LPN also confirmed that there should not be unsecured razors in the shower room.

    The surveyors observed a resident’s room that revealed “a container of bleach wipes on the bedside chest.” As a part of the investigation, the surveyors interviewed the facility Director of Nursing who confirmed that it was unacceptable “to have bleach wipes in a resident’s room.”

  • Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores or Heal Existing Pressure Sores
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated July 20, 2016, the state survey team documented that the Nursing Home had failed to “follow physician’s orders for wound care” for one of three residents with pressure ulcers. The investigative team reviewed a physician’s orders documented June 1, 2016, that instructed the nursing staff to cleanse the resident’s large deep tissue injury to the sacrum with normal saline and to “Pat dry, apply collagen to wound bed and cover with bordered gauze daily.” The nursing staff was also supposed to monitor for signs and symptoms of “infections one time a day for deep tissue injury.”

    However, when the survey team reviewed the resident’s Treatment Administration Record (TAR), there was “no documentation the wound care was performed” during the month on the 8th and 11th “as ordered.” Further investigation included a review of a resident’s “unhealed pressure ulcers” including “Stage III pressure ulcers that were present on readmission to the facility.” That resident’s TAR revealed “no documentation that the wound care was performed” during that month on the 4th, 5th, 7th, and 11th as ordered.

    The investigative team interviewed the Unit Manager who was asked: “where wound care was documented.” The Unit Manager confirmed that “if there are blanks, then in nursing, if it is not documented, that is not done.” The surveyors interviewed the facility Director of Nursing who confirmed that if the documentation is not completed, “it is not done.”

  • Failure to Provide and Implement an Infection Protection and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated July 20, 2016, a state investigator noted the nursing home's failure to “ensure practices to prevent the potential spread of infection and cross-contamination were maintained.” This deficient practice was evidenced by the facility’s failure to “ensure the use of appropriate contact precautions during suspected cases” of scabies for forty-five residents.

    The Nursing Home also failed to “track the rashes and treatment for scabies in the monthly infection control surveillance program for one of three months reviewed,” and one of four Licensed Practical Nurses failed to wash a nebulizer medication chamber while administering nebulizer treatment to a resident.

  • Failure to Safely Provide Medications and Other Similar Products Which Are Needed Every Day in Emergencies by a Licensed Pharmacist
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated January 26, 2017, the state investigators documented that the nursing home had failed “one of ten sampled residents at the facility.” The incident involved a resident “admitted under the care of hospice” who “expired at the facility on December 13, 2016.”

    The resident’s admission orders showed a “start date of November 1, 2016.” However, after a review of the resident’s Medication Administration Record (MAR), it was shown that the “first dose [of the physician’s ordered medication] was administered on November 12, 2016. A Nurses’ Note dated November 1, 2016, documented [that Truvada, an infection controlling medication prescribed to slow the progress of disease and prolong life] had not arrived, pending hospice coverage.”

    Further review showed that on November 6, 2016 Nursing Note documents reveal that the medication was still not available. The investigative team interviewed the Director of Nursing who verified that it is the facility’s responsibility to ensure that the medication is available and if not, should “contact the pharmacy, contact hospice, should have the medication within two hours.”

    The Director also stated that “if they cannot get medication, they need to notify me.” The surveyor stated that the nursing home “failed to ensure that residents receive the necessary medication as ordered.”

  • Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores or Heal Existing Pressure Sores
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 24, 2015, the state investigators documented that the facility had failed to “ensure skin assessments and administration of Liquid Protein were documented as ordered for one of three residents” with pressure ulcers.

    The surveyors reviewed the Nursing: Weekly Skin Evaluation Form that revealed that “there was no documented skin assessment [for the resident] for the week of March 23, 2015.” Additionally, a review of the Nursing: Weekly Skin Condition Report (Pressure and Non-Pressure Combined) Form “revealed there was no weekly skin condition report done for the weeks of March 30, 2015, and April 6, 2015.”

    The investigators interviewed the Director of Nursing who confirmed that “skin assessment should be documented weekly.” The Director also confirmed that “Liquid Gold should have been documented in April” but was not.

  • Failure to Ensure That the Doctors See a Resident’s Plan of Care at Every Visit and Make Notes about Progress and Orders in Writing
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 24, 2015, the state survey team noted that the nursing home had failed to “ensure physician’s orders were signed and dated for … residents” and the Stage II review. The investigators reviewed a physician’s telephone orders dated April 29, 2015, that shows insulin is to be administered to a resident based on a sliding-scale of blood sugar results. However, “this order was not signed or dated by the physician.”

    The surveyors interviewed the facility Director of Nursing who confirmed that the resident “had orders when he came back from the hospital” to receive three units, but the order was changed by verbal order to administer two units of insulin. The Director confirmed that “the nurse did not print it out, so it never got signed by the doctor.”

  • Failure to Provide and Implement an Infection Protection and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 24, 2015, a surveyor noted the nursing home's failure to “ensure practices to prevent the spread of infection were maintained when one of three (Registered Nurse (RN)) nurses administering medications failed to disinfect equipment between residents and failed to perform hand hygiene.” The surveyors also documented that three Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) and one Registered Nurse (RN) staff members failed to perform hand hygiene to prevent the spread of infection or handled food barehanded during dining.”

    The state investigators interviewed the Director of Nursing who confirmed that the facility “would expect an employee to wash their hands after picking something up off the floor” and touching food barehanded. The Director also confirmed that “an employee should wash hands after touching items in the environment and touching residents.”

Injured or Abused While Residing at Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center? We Can Help

If your loved one was victimized while a resident at Dickson Health and Rehabilitation Center, call the Tennessee nursing home abuse and neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 now. Our law firm fights aggressively on behalf of Dickson County victims of mistreatment living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Dickson.

Our nursing home abuse attorneys can represent your loved one injured by the inappropriate actions of the facility and staff. Our law firm will work on your behalf to ensure your family receives sufficient financial compensation to recover your damages. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a monetary compensation claim. Let us fight aggressively on your behalf to ensure your rights are protected.

We accept all cases of wrongful death, nursing home abuse, and personal injury through a contingency fee agreement. This arrangement postpones the need to make a payment to pay for legal services until after your case is successfully resolved through a jury trial award or negotiated out of court settlement. We provide each client a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee, meaning you owe us nothing if we cannot obtain compensation for your damages. Let our law firm start working on your case today to ensure your family receives the financial compensation they deserve for your harm. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

Sources:
Client Reviews
★★★★★
Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric