Information & Ratings on Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation, Danville, Kentucky

Attorneys for Neglected & Abused at Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation

Danville Centre for Health and RehabilitationDo you suspect that your loved one is the victim of nursing home abuse, neglect or mistreatment by caregivers, visitors, employees, and other patients? Do you believe that they have developed preventable facility-acquired bedsores, became infected through contamination with other patients or was assaulted or mistreated? If so, contact the Kentucky Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys now for immediate legal intervention.

Our team of attorneys has represented hundreds of nursing home victims and Kentucky including and Boyle County. Our team of dedicated lawyers fights aggressively on behalf of our clients to ensure that their family receives adequate monetary recovery for their damages. We use the law to hold those responsible for causing harm both legally and financially accountable. Let us begin working on your case today.

Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation

This long-term care (LTC) facility is a "for profit" 106-certified bed long term care center providing cares and services to residents of Danville and Boyle County, Kentucky. The Medicare/Medicaid-participating home is located at:

642 North Third Street
Danville, Kentucky, 40422
(859) 236-3972

In addition to providing around-the-clock skilled nursing care, Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation offers other services and amenities that include:

  • Clinical services
  • Rehab services
  • IV (intravenous) administration
  • Respiratory care
  • Wound care
  • Nutritional management
  • Pain management
  • Diabetic care
  • Cardiac care
  • Hospice
  • Restorative nursing
  • Optometry, dental and podiatry services
  • Oncology care
  • Tracheostomy care
  • Parkinson’s disease treatment program
  • Postsurgical care
Fined $629,737 for substandard care
Financial Penalties and Violations

Federal and state investigators can penalize any nursing home that has violated rules and regulations that harmed or could have resulted in harm of a resident. These penalties include imposing monetary fines and denying payment for Medicare services. Typically, the higher the monetary penalty, the more egregious the violation.

Within the last three years, nursing home regulatory agencies have imposed two monetary penalties against Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation citing substandard care. These penalties include a massive $616,110 fine on February 27, 2017, and a $13,627 fine on March 13, 2018, for a total of $629,737. Also, the nursing home received six formally filed complaints and self-reported one serious issue that all resulted in citations.

Additional documentation about fines and penalties can be found on the Kentucky Department of Health Care Nursing Home Reporting Website concerning this nursing facility.

Danville Kentucky Nursing Home Safety Concerns One Star Rating

Families can review comprehensive research results on Medicare.gov and Kentucky Department of Public Health nursing home databases. These sites detail every opened investigation, safety concerns, incident inquiries, health violations, dangerous hazards, and filed complaints. The information is valuable to determine the level of health, medical and hygiene care long-term care facilities in the local community provide their residents.

According to Medicare, the facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including one out of five stars concerning health inspections, three out of five stars for staffing issues and two out of five stars for quality measures. The Boyle County neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center have found serious deficiencies and safety concerns at Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation that include:

  • Failure to Immediately Notify the Resident, the Resident’s Doctor or Family Members of a Change in the Resident’s Condition Including a Decline in Their Health or Injury
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated November 3, 2016, the state investigator documented the facility’s failure to “ensure staff immediately informed the responsible party when one of twenty sampled residents experienced a change in condition.”

    The investigator stated that on October 31, 2016, “the facility staff assessed [the resident] to have auditory hallucinations and the resident was sent to the emergency room. However, there was no evidence the resident’s responsible party was notified of the resident’s change in condition.”

    The survey team reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Changing Resident’s Condition or Status that reads in part:

    “The licensed staff will assess any change in condition, notify the Physician, and notify the resident’s responsible party of the change and document [the change] in the medical record.”

    The survey team reviewed the resident’s medical records, MDS (Minimum Data Set) Assessment and Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS) that shows the cognitively intact resident was retaining urine and “was having auditory hallucinations.” The surveyors interviewed a family member of the resident who revealed that they were “not notify from the facility that [the resident] was sent to the emergency room. Further interview reviewed [the family member] was notified by the local hospital that [their loved one] was a patient on October 31, 2016.”

    The survey team interviewed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) on November 3, 2016, who revealed “she attempted to call [the resident’s] family but was unable to leave a message because she had called the wrong number. A further interview revealed she did document on the SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation) but did not remember speaking to [the resident’s] family.”

    During an interview with the Director of Nursing, it was revealed that “nursing staff is expected to notify the resident’s responsible party and document on the SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation) when there was a change in condition.” The Director stated that “this was monitored in the morning meeting and no concerns had been identified.”

  • Failure to Timely Report Suspected Abuse, Neglect and Report the Results of the Investigation to Proper Authorities
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated November 3, 2016, the state investigative team that the facility's failure to "ensure an incident of alleged abuse was immediately reported to the Administrator.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved one of twenty residents in the sampled survey.

    The surveyors stated that a resident’s “family member reported an alleged occurrence of abuse to the facility’s Admission/Marketing Director. However, the Director did not immediately notify the Charge Nurse or Administrator of the alleged incident.” The surveyors reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Abuse, Neglect, and Misappropriation revised in 2013 that reads in part:

    “All allegations must be reported to the Charge Nurse or Administrator and other officials [following] State law through established guidelines.”

    The state surveyors reviewed a resident’s Medical Records and interviewed the resident’s spouse on November 1, 2016. During the interview, it was revealed that a State Registered Nurse Aide (SRNA) “was talking to a facility nurse and was grouchy and said, ‘I am so sick and tired of (him/her) telling them I am talking about (him/her).’” The resident’s “spouse stated she was talking about [the resident]. A further interview revealed [the resident’s] spouse reported this incident to the Admission/Marketing Director on October 17, 2016.”

    Failure to follow protocols and reporting suspected abuse involving nursing staff – KY State Inspector

    The survey team interviewed the Admission/Marketing Director on the late afternoon of November 1, 2016, who revealed that the resident’s “family reported to her that an SRNA was grouchy. A further interview revealed she did not document the incident or immediately notify the Administrator. Additional interviews revealed she was trained to report any alleged occurrence of abuse” immediately.

    The Admission/Marketing Director stated that “she brought the interview with [the resident’s] family to the standup meeting the next morning.” However, a review of the standup meeting documentation “revealed no evidence of any alleged occurrences of abuse.”

    The surveyors interviewed the SRNA at 1:30 PM on November 2, 2016, who said that “she went to a nurse on October 17, 2016, and said a resident was yelling at us, and I cannot do my job.” The SRNA stated that “she was not talking about [the resident, but the resident’s] family may have overheard and thought she was talking about [the resident].”

    A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) was interviewed approximately 40 minutes later who revealed that “she remembered the Admission/Business Director brought up the alleged abuse in a standup meeting on October 18, 2016. A further interview with the LPN revealed it should be immediately reported if anyone mentions an SRNA being grouchy.”

    During an interview with the Director of Nursing it was revealed that “if anyone was made aware of abuse, they were to immediately report it to the Charge Nurse, the Director of Nursing, or Administrator.” The Administrator revealed that “any alleged occurrences of abuse should be immediately reported to the Charge Nurse, Director of Nursing, or Administrator.”

  • Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 13, 2018, the state investigators documented that the facility had failed to “ensure one of three sampled residents received adequate supervision and assistance to prevent accidents. The facility assessed [one resident] to require the assistance of two staff members for transfers with the use of a mechanical lift.”

    The state surveyors stated that “on February 20, 2018 at approximately 8:00 PM, a State Registered Nurse Aide (SRNA) attempted to transfer [a resident] from a shower chair to the resident’s bed without the assistance of another staff person and without the use of a mechanical lift, which resulted in the resident sustaining a left femur fracture.”

    The investigative team reviewed the facility’s policy titled: Safe Lifting and Movement of a Resident with a review date of June 1, 2015, that reads in part:

    “The facility utilizes appropriate techniques and devices to lift and move residents [to] protect the safety and well-being of staff and residents.”

    A review of the resident’s Medical Records and Annual MDS (Minimum Data Set) Assessment revealed that “the facility assessed the resident to require extensive assistance of two staff members for transfers along with the use of a mechanical lift.” The resident’s Care Plan dated March 13, 2015, revealed that the resident “requires the assistance of two staff members with a mechanical lift for transfers.”

    The survey team interviewed the SRNA just after noon on March 5, 2018, who revealed “she had given [the resident] a shower on February 20, 2018 and took the resident back to his/her room in a shower chair. She stated she was attempting to transfer the resident from the shower chair to his/her bed and the shower chair flipped out from under the resident.”

    The SRNA “stated she held the resident under his/her arms to keep the resident from falling to the floor until help could arrive to assist her. She stated she knew [the resident] requires the assistance of two staff members with a mechanical lift for transfers; however, she stated she was in a hurry, and she did not ask for assistance to transfer the resident.”

    The investigative team interviewed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) who stated that the resident “did not complain of pain initially; however, the resident started complaining of pain in his/her left leg at approximately 1:00 AM. Further interview with [the LPN] revealed she attempted to page the resident’s Physician but was unable to reach him. The continued interview revealed she reached the Nurse Practitioner at approximately 7:00 AM” and received orders.

    During an interview with the Director of Nursing, it was revealed that the LPN “called her on the evening of February 20, 2018 and reported to her that [an SRNA] attempted to transfer [the resident] without assistance and without the use of a mechanical lift. A further interview revealed [the SRNA] was trained on safe resident transfers and the use of the mechanical lift, and she was unsure why [the SRNA] attempted to transfer the resident without the lift.”

Neglected at Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation? Let Us Help You Today

Do you have suspicions that your loved one is being neglected or abused while living at Danville Centre for Health and Rehabilitation? If so, contact the Kentucky nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 for immediate legal intervention. Our law firm fights aggressively on behalf of Boyle County victims of mistreatment living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Danville. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim.

Our skillful attorneys provide legal representation in victim cases involving nursing home abuse when it occurs in private and public nursing facilities. We accept all cases of wrongful death, nursing home abuse, and personal injury through a contingency fee arrangement. This agreement postpones the need to pay for our legal services until after our legal team has resolved your claim for compensation through a jury trial award or negotiated settlement out of court.

Our law firm offers every client a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee, meaning you will owe us nothing if we are unable to obtain compensation to recover your family’s damages. We can start working on your case today to make sure you and your family receive monetary recovery for your damages. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

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Client Reviews
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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
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After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric