Information & Ratings on Christ The King Manor, Dubois, Pennsylvania

Lawyers for Mistreated & Neglected Patients at Christ The King Manor

Christ The King ManorWas your loved one abused or mistreated in a nursing facility? If so, you have the legal right to file a claim for compensation to recover your monetary damages and hold those at fault for causing harm legally accountable. The Pennsylvania Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys have represented many Clearfield County nursing home residents, and we can help your family too.

Christ The King Manor

This Long-Term Care Center is a 160-certified bed “not for profit” Home providing services to residents of Dubois and Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. The Medicare/Medicaid-participating Facility is located at:

1100 West Long Avenue
Dubois, Pennsylvania, 15801
(814) 371-3180

In addition to providing skilled nursing care, the facility also offers a memory support unit, adult day care, rehab and therapy, and independent living and senior living apartments and cottages.

Financial Penalties and Violations One Star Rating

Both the state of Pennsylvania and federal agencies penalize nursing homes by denying reimbursement payments from Medicare or imposing monetary fines anytime the facility is cited for a severe violation of established regulations and rules that harm or could harm residents. Within the last three years, investigators have not fined Christ The King Manor but have denied payment for Medicare services on October 19, 2017. Additionally, the facility has received seven formally filed complaints and submitted a facility-reported complaint about an issue at the facility within the last 36 months. Additional documentation about fines and penalties can be found on the Pennsylvania Department of Public Health posted surveys website concerning this nursing facility.

Failed to complete a thorough investigation to rule out neglect- PA State Inspector
Dubois Pennsylvania Nursing Home Patients Safety Concerns

The federal government and the Pennsylvania Department of Public Health website provide valuable data that families use to determine where to place a loved one who requires the highest level of skilled nursing care and hygiene assistance. The information contains historical details of safety concerns, opened investigations, incident inquiries, health violations, dangerous hazards, and filed complaints of every facility statewide.

According to Medicare.gov, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including one out of five stars concerning health inspections, two out of five stars for staffing issues and one out of five stars for quality measures. The Clearfield County neglect attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center have found serious deficiencies, hazardous violations and safety concerns at Christ The King Manor that include:

  • Failure to Provide Every Resident an Environment Free of Accident Hazards and Provide Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 19, 2017, a state surveying agency documented the nursing home’s failure to “complete an assessment for potential safety hazards with the use of an electric lifting recliner chair.” The deficient practice involved a resident who was injured “in a fall [rsulting in] a hip fracture.”

    The investigator reviewed the facility’s Incident Reports and Nursing Notes that revealed that the “resident fell from his electric lifting recliner chair. The recliner was noted to be up in the air with the resident lying in front of the recliner chair, and a possible cause was due to the remote control being within the resident’s reach.” An x-ray revealed that the resident had a fractured left hip. “There was no documented evidence that the electric lifting recliner chair was assessed for safety [before] its use.” This lack of assessment was confirmed by the Director of Nurses who said that there was “no documented evidence that [the resident] electric lifting recliner chair was assessed for safety [before] the resident using it.”

  • Failure to Immediately Notify the Resident, the Resident’s Doctor or Responsible Party of a Change in the Resident’s Condition including a Decline in Health or Injury
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated October 19, 2017, a state investigator documented that the nursing home failed “to ensure that the resident’s physician was notified timely about a fall and a change in condition.” The state investigator reviewed the facility’s policy concerning Physician Notification and the policy concerning Changes in a Resident’s Condition that read in part:

    “Staff was to ensure that the physician was notified about incidents, accidents and changes in the resident’s condition is appropriate.”
    The Registered Nurse Supervisor at the facility is “responsible for notifying the physician in the event of a serious incident, such as falls, a significant change in the resident’s physical, mental, psychosocial status, or in need to alter treatment significantly.”
    “The facility would promptly notify the resident’s attending physician about any changes in the resident’s medical or mental condition or status. The Registered Nurse Supervisor is to notify the resident’s attending physician or on-call physician when there was an accident or incident involving the resident.”

    The investigator reviewed the resident’s Nursing Notes that revealed that “the resident had a fall in the hallway outside her room.” At that time “the resident was out of her wheelchair and walked backward into her wheelchair when she tripped and fell. She received a skin tear (an injury that causes the top layer of the skin to separate from lower layers of the skin)” to her right elbow, a bump on the back of her head, and was complaining about back pain, which was normal for her.”

    A followup nursing note at 2:45 AM “revealed the resident’s right wrist was swollen and she was complaining of pain. At 3:19 AM, a nursing note revealed the resident’s right wrist was swollen, and the wanderguard (a wristband that activates a signal when the resident attempts to go through monitored hallway) was tight.”

    The surveyor noted that the resident had been injured in the evening and that a nursing note “revealed that the resident had swelling and pain to her right wrist, skin tear to the right elbow, bump to her head, and a report was faxed to the physician, and they were waiting for a response.” However, there was no documentation to show that the physician was notified of the resident’s condition until 7:54 AM the following day.

    The surveyor interviewed the facility Director of Nurses and Assistant Director of Nurses who “confirmed that there was no documented evidence that the resident’s physician was contacted timely following the above fall and changes in condition. They indicated that a nurse would not have called the physician with the right wrist pain and swelling until the next morning” which violates state and federal nursing home regulations.

  • Failure to Report and Investigate Any Acts or Reports of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, a state investigator noted the nursing home’s failure to “complete a thorough investigation to rule out neglect following a fall for [two residents].” The state investigator reviewed the facility’s policy regarding Incident Reports that reads in part:

    “All incident/accident reports are to be reviewed by Supervisors Staff to rule out abuse/neglect, and the Registered Nurse Supervisors are responsible for the initiation and completion of the incident report in conjunction with witnesses.”

    A review of the facility Incident Report and Nursing Note revealed that when “the resident was being pushed to the chapel [she] slid out of her wheelchair onto her right side. The resident was found lying on her right side, and she refused to be rolled due to her arm hurting too much. The resident was transferred to the emergency room.”

    A Nursing Aide at the facility completed a witness statement saying that the resident “was sitting in her wheelchair when she put her feet down, which stop the wheelchair.” The Aide “did not indicate if there were any other witnesses to the incident.” However, an interview with the Nursing Aide revealed that “the pastor who held the service in the chapel witnessed the incident, as well as a resident who stated that she would pray for the Nursing Aide. However, the facility’s investigation documentation revealed that there were two witness statements obtained from staff who were not in the area, and there was no documented evidence that witness statements were obtained from the pastor or the resident who witnessed the incident.”

    The investigator interviewed the Director of Nurses who “confirmed that witness statements were not obtained from the pastor or the resident and that the two witness statements that were obtained were from staff who were not around when the resident’s incident occurred.” The investigator noted that the Director of Nurses could not provide further “documented evidence to show that a thorough investigation of the incident was completed to rule out that neglect was involved.”

    In a separate incident involving the same summary statement of deficiencies, the investigator reviewed an incident report and nursing note that revealed that a different resident “was being assisted from the bed to a wheelchair by a Nursing Aide when he lost his balance and fell, hitting the left side of his head on the over-bed table.” The notation shows that the “resident stated that the wheelchair brakes were not tight. The resident was found lying on the floor next to his bed with his head resting on a crossbar of the over-bed table. There was bruising noted to the left occipital (back of the head) and the left top of the head, and there was a 2.0 cm scratch behind the left ear.”

    There was documentation found in the incident report that “indicated that a possible cause of the incident was that the wheelchair brakes were not tight [before] the transfer.” However, the state survey team noted that the “facility’s investigation contained no documented evidence that a statement was obtained from the Registered Nurse to assess [the resident] and assisted him back into bed.” The Director of Nurses revealed that “she was not sure if there are any witnesses to [the resident’s] fall.

    In a separate summary statement of deficiencies dated February 23, 2017, the state investigator documented the facility’s failure to “complete a thorough investigation to rule out misappropriation of resident property.” The deficient practice involved one resident at the facility. The investigator reviewed the facility’s policy regarding abuse that reads in part:

    “When an incident of resident abuse, neglect, exploitation or misappropriation of the resident’s property is alleged or suspected, the facility will take necessary action to prevent further potential abuse and will notify the appropriate Department of Health field office and will [investigate] the allegation.”

    The state investigator interviewed the Social Services Director who revealed that after the resident had died, “the resident’s family member called the facility and indicated that her mother’s atomic clock was missing from the resident’s room. The Social Services Director indicated that she did not start an investigation into the family’s allegation.”

    During an interview with the Director of Nurses, it was revealed that “a Licensed Practical Nurse from personal care reported to her that the resident’s grandson was in the resident’s room after she passed away and had a maintenance worker unlock a drawer for the grandson to get the clock. The Director of Nurses indicated that after this allegation was made, she did not get statements from the Licensed Practical Nurse or the Maintenance Worker and did not complete an investigation to rule out [that an unauthorized person took the resident's belongings].”

  • Failure to Ensure the Environment Is Free from Accident Hazards and Risks and Residents Are Provided Adequate Supervision to Prevent Avoidable Accidents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated June 16, 2017, a state surveyor documented the nursing home’s failure to “complete an assessment for potential safety hazards with the use of a wheelchair for [one resident that resulted] in a fall and hip fracture” involving the incident listed above.

    Failure that “resulted in a fall and hip fracture” - PA State Inspector

    The state investigator interviewed the Director of Nurses who “confirmed that there was no documented evidence that the resident’s wheelchair was checked [before] the resident receiving the wheelchair for use.” The Director also stated that “the resident’s wheelchair brakes were adjusted twice after the incident, and that following the incident, the facility developed the policy regarding checking new equipment [before] distribution to residents.”

Do You Have More Questions about Christ The King Manor?

If you believe your loved one has suffered abuse, neglect or mistreatment while a resident at Christ The King Manor, contact Pennsylvania nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 today. Our law firm fights aggressively on behalf of Clearfield County victims of mistreatment living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Dubois. Let our skilled attorneys file and handle your nursing home abuse compensation claim against all those who caused your loved one harm. Our years of experience ensure a successful resolution. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim. Let us fight aggressively on your behalf to ensure your rights are protected.

Our attorneys accept all personal injury claims, nursing home abuse suits, medical malpractice cases, and wrongful death lawsuits through a contingency fee arrangement. This agreement postpones making upfront payments for our legal services until after we have successfully resolved your compensation claim through a negotiated settlement or jury trial award. We provide each client a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee, meaning you owe us nothing if we cannot obtain compensation for your damages. Let our law firm start working on your case today to ensure your family receives the financial compensation they deserve for your harm. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

Sources:

Client Reviews
★★★★★
Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric