Chicago Nursing Home Neglect & Bed Sore

Chicago Nursing Home Bed Sore Lawyers Chicago Nursing Home Bed Sore

The development of pressure sores is a common occurrence among the elderly and disabled, especially among individuals with limited mobility who reside in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and rehabilitation centers nationwide. Our Chicago nursing home abuse lawyers have seen a substantial increase of cases involving neglect and abuse occurring in nursing facilities in Illinois. Nearly all bedsores (pressure sores; decubitus ulcers; pressure ulcers) are preventable, which means most incidences involving the development of an open wound could have been avoided had proper assessment, monitoring, appropriate care and treatment been provided by the nursing staff.

A pressure sore begins as a skin wound caused by direct pressure on the individual’s skin, usually in an area that has a thin layer of tissue and muscle between the bone and skin. Commonly, bedsores develop on shoulder blades, buttocks, heels, sacrum, elbows, hips, back of the head, on the tips of the ears and ankles. Because the sore is a pressure induced wound it cannot develop until the body area is exposed to prolonged levels of unrelieved pressure that can occur when the nursing home resident is left to sit in a wheelchair or recliner or lie in bed for an extended amount of time. Our Chicago bed sore lawyers stand ready to help you and your loved one.

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The continuous pressure blocks much-needed oxygen and nutrients by restricting blood flow to the area. Without relief to the area that provides a flow of blood, skin in the area will begin to deteriorate. If blood flow is restricted for too long, the damaged area will begin to kill off the skin and underlying tissue. When this occurs, an open wound forms that if left to decline can create a crater that exposes muscle and bone. The damaging effects in later stages can begin within days, placing the health and well-being of the individual in grave danger due to exposure to infection that eventually could lead to gangrene and ultimately death.

Chicago Illinois Nursing Home Pressure Sore Concerns

The Chicago nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have served as legal advocates to many Illinois residents living in nursing facilities who have suffered the pain and damaging effects of preventable pressure sores. Our team of experienced attorneys reviews publicly available pressure ulcer data pulled from national bedsore databases including the website www.Medicare.gov. Our Illinois elder abuse lawyers have published our findings below as a way to assist family members facing the undesirable position of placing a loved one in an assisted living home, nursing facility or rehabilitation center in their local community.

Comparing Chicago Area Nursing Facilities with Respect to Development of Decubitus Ulcers

Our Cook County elder abuse lawyers have posted the outlined information below concerning nursing facilities throughout the Chicago metropolitan area that currently maintain a one star rating out of five possible stars in national nursing facility databases. In addition, our law firm lists serious and primary concerns discovered by state investigators and surveyors who routinely perform scheduled and unscheduled inspections.

Alden Wentworth Rehabilitation and Health Care Center

201 West 69th Street
Chicago, IL 60621
(773) 487-1200
A “For-Profit” 300-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols for Treating Pressure Ulcers That Resulted in a Degrading Wound

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 11/19/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for multiple failures including:

  • A failure “to turn and reposition [residents requiring assistance] every two hours”
  • A failure “to develop a care plan for identifying skin breakdown”
  • A failure “to properly store dressing change supplies”

These deficient practices directly affected four residents at the facility “reviewed for wound care.”

The complaint investigation was initiated in part after a review of a resident’s 11/03/2015 emergency room record that indicated the resident “was admitted with a pressure ulcer to the buttocks, bilateral thighs and back. [The resident’s] records indicate that [the resident] was referred to the wound care physician.” In addition, a member of the resident’s family was notified by the hospital on 11/16/2015 stating that the resident “arrived with pressure ulcers to the buttocks and back. [The family member] stated she was unaware that [the resident] had developed pressure ulcers [… and] that whenever she visited with [the resident] the staff had to be asked to turn and reposition [the resident].”

An interview with a facility Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) on 11/17/2015 at 3 PM revealed that the resident “had skin discoloration to her right heel. [The resident’s 11/13/2015 Shower Sheet] indicates that [the resident] had some skin changes to the right heel.” The Resident’s Skin Integrity Care Plan “does not include intervention to turn and reposition every two hours, although [the resident’s] Minimum Data Set (MDS) indicates that [the resident] requires extensive two person assistance for bed mobility” and has a 10/17/2015 Braden Scale score of 13.1 “indicating a moderate risk for skin breakdown.”

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Our Chicago bed sore attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols concerning a resident’s bedsores could jeopardize the health and well-being of the resident. Failing to develop a care plan for individuals identified at high risk for skin breakdown and failing to implement turning and repositioning schedules might be considered negligence or mistreatment. The deficient practices do not follow the established policies, procedures and protocols adopted by Alden Wentworth Rehabilitation and Health Care Center and violates state and federal nursing home regulations.

Belhaven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

11401 South Oakley Avenue
Chicago, IL 60643
(773) 233-6311
A “For-Profit” 221-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols for Treating Pressure Ulcers That Resulted in a Degrading Wound

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/09/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “follow their policy and procedure for the treatment and prevention of skin breakdown.” This deficient practice directly affected one resident at the facility “reviewed for pressure ulcers.”

The complaint investigation was initiated after a review of a resident’s records and their Weekly Skin Alteration Record that documents that the resident “has a facility-acquired stage IV pressure ulcer to the sacrum. The current care plan documents that [the resident] is at risk for skin breakdown related to incontinence of the bowel and that the wound should be treated daily based on physician’s orders.”

However, a 12/03/2015 10:45 AM wound observation done by the state surveyor with the facility’s Wound Nurse and CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant) noted that the resident “was observed lying in bed with an incontinent brief. The incontinent brief was removed and the [resident] was noted with the bowel movement; there was no dressing in place to cover the wound.” 10 minutes later, the wound nurse stated that “the dressing was last changed yesterday. The staff should have alerted the nurse when the dressing came off.” Minutes later, the CNA stated “I do not know if the resident had a dressing in place, I have not changed her since I started my shift.”

The state surveyor conducted a 12/04/2015 interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who stated “the staff was in-serviced on reporting to the nurse about dressings that come off, are loose or soiled so that the dressing can be changed.”

Our Chicago elder abuse lawyers recognize that any failure to follow procedures, policies and protocols concerning providing care to treat bedsores could jeopardize the health of residents. The deficient practice might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it does not follow the facility’s policies and procedures for treating and preventing skin breakdown adopted by Belhaven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center that requires staff to “initiate wound care protocols and implement and follow a care plan with appropriate interventions to address the wound.”

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Chalet Living and Rehabilitation Center

7350 North Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60626
(773) 274-1000
A “For-Profit” 219-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores or Heal Existing Pressure Sores

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 08/11/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “follow their wound prevention policy and assess and develop interventions to reduce the risk of pressure sore development.” This deficient practice affected one resident at the facility who was “reviewed for pressure sores.”

The complaint investigation was initiated in part due to a review of a resident’s Complex Alert Documentation Report dated between 07/19/2015 and 07/21/2015 that made no mention of the resident’s skin alteration. In addition, the resident’s “care plan did not document any new interventions for skin alteration identified on 7/19-7/21/2015. [The resident’s] care plan was updated on 07/22/2015 once the pressure ulcer was identified.” At that time, the resident’s wound was identified as “unstageable pressure ulcers.” In addition, “there was no documentation or any new, revised additional interventions or physician’s orders.”

A member of the resident’s family was interviewed on 08/05/2015 and stated that “I came to the facility [on a redacted date] and noted the discoloration of [the resident’s] back about the size of a dime, it was closed but it looked wrinkled. I inform the staff, they told me they were to inform the nurse. When I came back, I told [an RN] about it who said that no one informed [him/her].”

In 08/06/2015 3 PM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing revealed that “The Complex Alert Documentation Report is a documentation completed by CNAs (Certified Nursing Assistants” during their shift [and] the CNAs are supposed to notify the nurse if there is any skin alteration or changes. The nurse would then notify wound care nurse about the findings.” The facility’s Director of Nursing also stated that the registered nurse “had documented the 24 hour report, new skin alterations in [the resident] and reported this to [the treatment nurse at the facility].”

The state surveyor conducted a telephone interview on 08/11/2015 with the facility’s Treatment Nurse who stated “not remembering whether [the resident] was referred to [him/her].” The treatment nurse then stated “that when a skin alteration is referred, assessment is being done, documented in the resident is monitored [… and] if the current intervention and treatment is not effective, then the doctor should be called into the treatment or interventions should be changed.”

The facility’s primary physician was interviewed on 08/10/2015 over the phone and confirmed that the resident “acquired pressure ulcers from the facility as [the resident] was at risk for pressure ulcer development due to poor oral intake.”

Our Chicago nursing home attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols to treat residents with bedsores could potentially diminish the quality of life and cause additional significant harm. The deficient practices might be considered negligence, especially because the facility did not follow their own policy titled: Pressure Ulcers that reads in part:

“It is the policy of this facility to ensure the residents whose clinical conditions and medical [diagnosis are provided treatment following specific procedures]:

  • Timely Identification of residents assessed to be at risk for skin breakdown [with] each risk factor and potential cause(s) identified should be reviewed individually and addressed in resident’s care plan.

  • Prevention of Skin Breakdown [with] inspection of the skin every shift with care for signs of breakdown.

  • Documentation [where] The care plan shall be evaluated and revised based on the resident’s response to treatment, treatment goals and outcomes [and] the resident’s skin alteration/breakdown shall be documented in the resident’s clinical records.

  • Pressure Ulcer Treatment [to] initiate wound care treatment upon identification of the wound with physician’s orders [and] develop a care plan with appropriate interventions.”

Lake Shore Health Care and Rehabilitation Center

7200 North Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60626
(773) 973-7200
A “For-Profit” 313-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent the Recurrence of Previously Healed Pressure Sores

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 06/03/2015, a complaint investigation against the facility was opened for its failure to “assess, identify and implement measures to prevent the recurrence of a sacral pressure ulcer.” This deficient practice directly affected one resident at the facility “reviewed for wound care prevention and management.”

The state investigator conducted a 06/03/2015 2:00 PM interview with the facility’s Director of Nursing who stated that the resident “had a history of recurring sacral pressure ulcer [… and] was readmitted from acute care facility in January 2015 with a stage II sacral ulcer. [The Director] stated that [the resident] developed a stage I sacral pressure ulcer while at this facility on 05/10/201 [… and] was in hospice at this time.” However, The Director of Nursing “was unable to provide documentation to support that [the resident] was repositioned every two hours and had skin assessments done since 04/04/2015.”

Later that day, the facility’s Administrator was interviewed and acknowledged that the resident’s “care plan did not note [the resident’s] history of sacral pressure ulcers and was not updated with the reoccurrence of the sacral pressure ulcer on 05/10/2015.”

The state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s policies, especially the one titled: Pressure Ulcer Evaluation Policy in the presence of the Facility Administrator that clearly states:

“Risk assessments using the Braden Scale are to be completed quarterly.”

The Facility Administrator confirmed that “the resident skin assessments are completed twice weekly with showers/baths. [However, the Administrator] was unable to provide documentation to support skin assessments were being done twice weekly” or provide documentation indicating the Braden Scale rating assessment conducted on the resident.

The state surveyor conducted a 06/03/2015 4:30 PM interview with the attending physician who stated that the resident’s “sacral pressure ulcers from October 2014 through January 2015 took a long time to heal due to [the resident’s] diagnoses.” The attending physician also stated “that he was made aware on 05/10/2015 of recurrence of [the resident’s sacral pressure ulcer and gave treatment orders at that time [… and] stated that [the resident’s] condition continued to decline and [the resident] entered into hospice in April 2015.” However, the state surveyor conducted a review of the facility’s shower record/skin check form notes to see that the resident “received a shower or bath and had skin checked on 3/3, 3/4, 3/7, 3/14, 3/17, 3/24, 3/28, and 04/04/2015.” Even so, the Administrator and nursing staff at Lake Shore Health Care and Rehabilitation Center were “unable to provide documentation to indicate the resident’s] skin was check for any redness, bruising or wounds between04/04/2015 and [the resident’s discharge on 05/18/2015.”

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Our Chicago area nursing home abuse attorneys recognize that any failure to follow protocols, policies and procedures when providing treatment to a resident with bedsores might be considered negligence or mistreatment. In addition, the deficient practices of the nursing facility, administrators, supervisors and nursing staff directly violate state and federal nursing home regulations.

Warren Barr South Loop

1725 South Wabash
Chicago, Il 60616
(312) 922-2777
A “For-Profit” 197-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment Including Turning and Repositioning to Heal Existing Pressure Sores

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/11/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “turn and reposition [the resident] with six pressure ulcers who is dependent on the staff for turning and repositioning.”

The complaint investigation was initiated as a result, in part, of a review of resident’s records and observations including a 09/08/2015 11:15 AM observation of a resident who “was lying on his back in bed. From 11:15 AM to 1:30 PM during intervals of 15 minutes, [the resident] was observed to be lying in the same position. The surveyor was sitting in the unit’s dayroom, with direct view of [the resident’s] room. No one entered the room of [the resident] to turn or reposition him from 11:15 AM to 1:30 PM.”

The state investigator conducted a 09/08/2015 1:30 PM interview with a CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant) assigned to the resident who stated “[the resident] is so heavy. The last time I turned [the resident] was at 10 AM. I am not going to sit up and lie. I did not get a chance to turn [the resident, because the resident] is too heavy.”

The state surveyor conducted an interview with a member of the nursing staff at 1:30 PM on the same day who stated “that residents are to be turned every two hours, two hours should be the maximum amount of time between turns, and that there was a turning schedule. We usually keep up and monitor that.” However, the member of the nursing staff was unable “to state the last time [the resident] was turned and repositioned and stated that she would have to ask [the CNA].” The state surveyor indicated that “no turning schedule was observed to be above the bed of [the resident].” The state investigator observed the resident undergoing wound care treatments the following day at 2:05 PM which revealed the resident “had six pressure wounds, four of which are stage IV wounds on the left hip, left lateral ankle, left sacrum in the back of the head on the left side. [The resident] also had two unstageable wounds, one on his left heel and one on left lateral hip. Wound care treatments to the back of [the resident’s] head, sacrum and hips were observed. Each of the resident’s wounds that were observed was foul-smelling with that dark green is great drainage present. Each wound appeared deep with tunneling present [… and] the sacral wound had yellowish bloodied drainage present with the area outside the wound appearing to be boggy.”

Our Chicago elder abuse lawyers recognize it any failure to follow protocols when providing treatment for residents requiring specialized care could jeopardize their health and well-being. The deficient practice might be considered negligence or mistreatment because it does not follow established procedures, protocols and policies adopted by Warren Barr South Loop, especially the facility’s 05/01/2015 policy titled: Wound Care Program that reads in part:

“Activity, Mobility and Positioning: Establish an individualized turning and repositioning schedule if the resident is immobile or with impaired physical functioning. While in bed or in wheelchair, resident should be turned / repositioned at least every two hours or as indicated in the resident’s plan of care. Frequency of position changes is individualized according to the resident’s plan of care.”

When a Nursing Facility in Chicago/Cook County Is Negligent

By state and federal regulations, the medical staff at nursing facilities throughout Illinois are required to assess every individual admitted to the nursing home to look for any potential skin breakdown. If the admitting resident is considered high risk or moderate risk for skin and skin tissue breakdown, the medical team is required by law to pay close attention the resident by routinely monitoring their skin to look for any potential problems.

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Any failure of the nursing staff to properly assess, monitor and provide appropriate treatment according to the physician’s orders and the resident’s care plan could be considered negligence where the nursing home and staff members could be held accountable.

Unnoticed or Overlooked Problems Contributing to Bed Sore in Chicago Nursing Homes

Often times, the elderly individual suffers in silence because the bedsore is unnoticed due to a lack of training by the nursing staff. Other times, the pressure sores overlooked by CNAs (Certified Nursing Assistants) due to their failure to follow established protocols to detect a developing bedsore. Without adequate and appropriate treatment, a newly developed pressure sore can degrade to a debilitating decubitus ulcer within days.

In many incidences, bedsores are detected by family members serving as advocates for their loved one residing in a nursing facility. Often times, the family will hire a personal injury attorney who specializes in nursing home neglect cases who can provide numerous legal options to stop the abuse and mistreatment immediately.

Can I Afford a Lawyer to Help Me Prosecute a Chicago Pressure Sore Case?

The Chicago nursing home abuse attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC can provide the family with much-needed guidance, and assistance in filing appropriate charges. Our law firm can initiate legal action to ensure that the abuse, neglect and mistreatment does not continue. Our Illinois team of skilled attorneys have years of experience representing victims in cases involving negligence resulting in bedsores.

Contact our Chicago Elder Abuse Law Office Today at (800) 926-7565

Schedule your appointment to meet with our reputable attorneys to discuss your case during your free, no obligation case review. All information you share will remain confidential. We accept all wrongful death lawsuits, personal injury claims and nursing home neglect cases through a contingency fee agreement. This means our team of attorneys will provide immediate legal representation without the need of you paying us a retainer or an upfront fee.

To learn about some of our results for pressure sore cases, view our results page here. For an analysis of bed sore case values in Illinois, view our Illinois Bed Sore Case Calculator.

Should you have questions about Illinois law related to pressure sores, view our page here.

For information on bed sores and nursing home negligence in other Illinois cities, please review the pages below:

  • Aurora Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Bloomington Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Cicero Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Champaign Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Joliet Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Moline Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Naperville Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Orland Park Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Peoria Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Rockford Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Schaumburg Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Springfield Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Urbana Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
  • Waukegan Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Lawyers
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