Information & Ratings on Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehabilitation Center, Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania

Lawyers for Neglected & Mistreated Residents at Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehabilitation Center

Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehabilitation CenterNegligence in a nursing facility takes on many forms, where caregivers misbehave, or other residents assault residents because of a lack of proper supervision. Many nursing facilities are understaffed or hire nurses and nurse’s aides without adequate training. Others fail to follow acceptable hiring practices and neglect to check newly employed staff against the State-run Abuse and Neglect Registry to ensure the employee does not have a history of mistreatment. The Pennsylvania Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys have represented many families whose loved ones were victimized in nursing facilities in Montgomery County, and we can help your family too.

Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehabilitation Center

This Long-Term Care Center is a “for-profit” 181-certified bed Home providing cares to residents of Wyndmoor and Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The Medicare/Medicaid-participating Facility is located at:

8833 Stenton Avenue
Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, 19038
(215) 836-2100

In addition to providing around-the-clock skilled nursing care, Chestnut Hill Lodge Healthcare and Rehab also offers:

  • Cardiac care
  • Orthopedic rehabilitation
  • Post-surgical rehab
  • Pain management
  • Stroke rehab
  • Hospice care
  • Alzheimer’s and dementia care
  • Specialized diabetes care
  • Nutritional management
Financial Penalties and Violations One Star Rating
Fined $189,647 on April 19, 2017 for Substandard Care

Federal and state investigators have a legal obligation to penalize any nursing home that violated a rule or regulation that harmed or could have harmed a resident. These penalties typically include an imposed monetary fines or denial of payment for Medicare services. Usually, the higher the violation, the higher the fine. Within the last three years, nursing home regulators have fined Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehabilitation Center once involving a $189,647 penalty on April 19, 2017. Additional documentation about fines and penalties can be found on the Pennsylvania Department of Public Health posted surveys website about this nursing home.

Wyndmoor Pennsylvania Nursing Home Residents Safety Concerns

Our attorneys have obtained and reviewed data on every Pennsylvania long-term care home from various online publically available sources including the PA Department of Public Health website and Medicare.gov. The information serves as an essential tool when making an informed decision of placing a loved one in facility-care. Additionally, the data can help families better understand the type of care their loved one is currently receiving the nursing center.

According to Medicare, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including one out of five stars concerning health inspections, one out of five stars for staffing issues and one out of five stars for quality measures. The Montgomery County neglect lawyers at Nursing Home Law Center have found various deficiencies, violations and safety concerns at Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehab Center including:

  • Failure to Develop, Implement and Enforce an Infection Prevention and Control Program
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 9, 2018, a state surveyor documented the nursing home’s failure to “maintain an effective infection control program related to hand hygiene.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff had the potential of hurting everyone in the facility. The investigator reviewed the facility’s Hand Hygiene Policy and Procedure dated August 2016 that read in part:

    “Wash hands with antimicrobial and non-antimicrobial soap and water in the following situations: when hands are visibly dirty, before and after eating, when hands are visibly soiled with blood and other bodily fluids, after using the bathroom, after exposure or suspected exposure to spore-forming pathogens.”
    “If hands are not visibly soiled, use alcohol-based hand rub for routinely decontaminating hands in the following situations: before having direct contact with residents, before putting on clean or sterile gloves, after contact with residents’ skin, when moving from a contaminated body site to a clean body site during cares, after contact with inanimate objects such as medical equipment [near] the resident, after removing gloves.”

    The state investigator observed a medication administration on March 6, 2018, when an employee “failed to wash hands and did not follow hand hygiene at the beginning of medication administration for [a resident].” Ten minutes later, a follow-up observation was made of the medication administration with the same employee who “failed to wash hands and did not follow hand hygiene at the beginning of medication administration for [another resident].”

    The same scenario occurred again with the same employee at 11:00 AM who “failed to wash hands and did not follow hand hygiene at the beginning of medication administration via PEG tube for [a third resident].” The investigator interviewed a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) about twelve minutes later who confirmed that that employee “did not wash hands and did not follow hand hygiene at the beginning of the medication administration to [three different residents]. The facility failed to maintain an effective infection control program related to hand hygiene.”

  • Failure to Ensure the Environment Remained Safe, Easy to Use, Clean and Comfortable for Residents, Staff, and the Public
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated January 25, 2018, a state surveyor performed an annual licensure and certification survey and noted the facility’s failure to maintain a “safe, functional, sanitary and comfortable environment and working conditions for the nursing staff as it relates to the conditions in the medication storage rooms” involving five rooms. The state investigator observed medication rooms “on all units of the facility, in the presence of the Director of Nurses.”

    It was revealed that “on the E-Wing medication room, the cabinet underneath the sink was full of a black-like substance resembling mold. The bottom of the cabinet was also damage, very dirty and looked damp. It was also observed that the drawers in the C-Wing medication room were soiled with crackers and pretzel pieces. Some drawers were inoperable. There were also stained ceiling tiles.”

    Further observation of the facility included looking at the A-Wing medication room where the “cabinet door below the sink was screwed shut.” In the B-Wing medication room, the investigator found that there were “employee coats and purses placed in the corner the room with no place for employees to store personal items. There was dark/dirt substance underneath the cabinet sink. It was extremely dirty between the refrigerator and the cabinet. There were stained ceiling tiles.” The investigator also documented that the C/D Wing medication room had “dirt underneath the cabinet sink. There were several holes in the ceiling tiles. The ceiling lights were very dim in all the medication rooms.”

    The facility failed to provide “a safe, functional, sanitary and comfortable environment and all working conditions for the nursing staff as it relates to the conditions in the medication storage rooms.”

  • Failure to Ensure That the Nurses and Nurse’s Aides Have Appropriate Competencies to Care for Every Resident to Maximize Each Resident’s Well-Being
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 9, 2018, a state investigator determined “that medication management competency was not demonstrated by one licensed staff member regarding medication administration.” The investigator noted that after reviewing a resident’s Medication Administration Record (MAR) that “an unidentified a staff member changed the medication administration time” from its prescribed time to “6:00 PM. There was no documented evidence that the physician had been notified.” The investigator interviewed the resident who “confirmed that the resident did not receive two doses of insulin” as prescribed. The survey team requested the resident’s Medication Administration Record to a licensed nurse but received “an altered copy of the resident’s Medication Administration Record.”

    The facility Nursing Home Administrator conducted a meeting and “an investigation was completed by the facility administration. It was determined that the Medication Administration Record “had been altered” and that “the licensed staff member was not assigned to the resident at the time of the administration.” The investigator stated that the “facility failed to ensure that the Medication Management Competency was demonstrated by one licensed staff member regarding medication administration.”

  • Failure to Ensure That Every Resident Remains Free from Physical Restraints Unless Need for Medical Treatment
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated January 6, 2017, the state agency surveyor documented the nursing home’s failure to “provide an environment as free from physical restraints as possible for [one of twenty-five clinical records reviewed].” The investigator reviewed the facility policy and procedure titled: Restraint Alternative that reads in part:

    “Physical restraint is any manual method, or physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment attached to or adjacent to the resident’s body that the resident cannot remove easily, which restricts freedom from movement (if a resident could perform movement independently) or access to his or her body.”

    The investigator also reviewed the part of the policy that says, “the use of restraint, its purpose and time limit shall be explained to the resident, family member, or legal representative and a consent form must be completed.” The policy states that “all residents physically restrained will be reviewed by the Physical Restraint Committee via monthly assessments to evaluate the resident’s condition and the necessity of continuing the restraint.”

    “Failed to provide an environment as free from physical restraints as possible” – PA State Inspector

    The investigator observed a resident during an initial tour of the facility in the presence of a Licensed Practical Nurse. At that time, the resident “was wearing a hand mitt over the entire right hand.” At the time of the observation, the nurse indicated that the resident “is not able to remove the hand mitt independently and it is never removed.” The investigator reviewed the resident’s clinical records including a physician order that indicated the resident is suffering a medical condition “with behavioral disturbances, anxiety disorder, and paranoia.”

    The investigator continued to make observations of the resident for the remaining days of the survey. During this time, it was “revealed that the hand mitt remained in place on the resident’s right hand. This observation of the resident was confirmed during an interview with [the licensed nurse] who also revealed that [the resident] wears a hand mitt over the right hand 24 hours a day, further indicating that it is never removed and remains in place when [the resident] is out of bed to the wheelchair.”

    The investigator reviewed the resident’s nursing Care Plan that “revealed an anxiety Care Plan related to [the resident], at risk of side effects from antianxiety medication use, further review of the Care Plan revealed a handwritten indication, for approaches [that included] padded mitt to the right hand.” At one point, the investigator interviewed the resident and asked, “can you take off this hand mitt?” The resident replied that they were “not able to remove the hand mitt from his right hand.” The nurse confirmed that “the facility did not follow the facility policy and procedure related to the use of the hand mitt restraint” for that resident.”

    The investigator documented that the facility “failed to provide an environment as free from physical restraints as possible for one resident by not attempting alternative interventions.” Additionally, the facility “failed to implement a process of reducing the use of the hand mitt for one resident.”

We You Abused or Restrained at Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehab Center?

If you suspect your loved one has had any sign or symptom of abuse, mistreatment or neglect while a resident at Chestnut Hill Lodge Health and Rehab Center, it is crucial to contact Pennsylvania nursing home abuse attorneys at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 immediately for legal help. Our law firm fights aggressively on behalf of Montgomery County victims mistreated while living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Wyndmoor. Our skilled attorneys can successfully resolve your victim case involving nursing home abuse or neglect and hold those that caused your loved one harm financially accountable. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim. Let us fight aggressively on your behalf to ensure your rights are protected.

Our attorneys accept all personal injury claims, nursing home abuse suits, medical malpractice cases, and wrongful death lawsuits through a contingency fee agreement. This arrangement postpones your need to make a payment for our legal services until after your case is successfully resolved through a negotiated out of court settlement or jury trial award. Our law firm offers every client a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee, meaning you will owe us nothing if we are unable to obtain compensation to recover your family’s damages. We can provide legal representation starting today to ensure your family is adequately compensated for your damages. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

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Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
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After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric