Information & Ratings on Cheltenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Attorneys for Mistreated & Abused Residents at Cheltenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

Cheltenham Nursing and Rehabilitation CenterMistreatment in a nursing facility often means that the doctor, nursing staff, employees or other caregivers failed to provide care according to established standards that resulted in an injury, harm or wrongful death. Other times the victim is assaulted by other residents. Any form of abuse or negligent care in a nursing facility is inexcusable. When a victim is harmed, the law provides an avenue for compensation through a civil claim to ensure that the family recovers their financial damages. The Pennsylvania Nursing Home Law Center Attorneys have represented many Philadelphia County nursing home residents to ensure their rights are protected, and we can help your family too.

Cheltenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

This Nursing Home is a “not for profit” Medicare/Medicaid-participating Center providing cares and services to residents of Philadelphia and Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. The 255-certified bed Nursing Facility is located at:

600 W Cheltenham Avenue
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19126
(215) 927-7300

In addition to providing around-the-clock skilled nursing care, Cheltenham Nursing and Rehab Center also offers:

  • Post-acute care
  • Palliative care
  • Stroke recovery
  • Dementia care
  • Cardiovascular care
  • Pain management
  • Tracheotomy care
  • Orthopedic rehabilitation
  • Postsurgical/medical rehab
  • IV therapy
  • Memory care
  • Restorative care
  • Wellness, medication, and stretching
Financial Penalties and Violations One Star Rating

The investigators for the federal and state nursing home regulatory agencies have the legal authority to impose monetary fines or deny payment for Medicare services if the nursing facility is cited for serious violations of rules and regulations. Within the last three years, investigators levied a monetary fine against Cheltenham Nursing And Rehabilitation Center involving an $8,453 fine on March 8, 2017. Additional documentation about penalties and fines can be found on the Pennsylvania Department of Public Health posted surveys website concerning this nursing home.

“Failed to ensure that residents were free from physical restraints.” – PA State Inspector
Philadelphia Pennsylvania Nursing Home Residents Safety Concerns

Families can download statistics from the Medicare.gov online site to view a comprehensive publically available historical list of all opened investigations, filed complaints, dangerous hazards, health violations, safety concerns, and incident inquiries of every nursing home statewide. The information can be used to determine the level of health, and hygiene care each community long-term care facility provides its patients.

According to Medicare, this facility maintains an overall rating of one out of five stars, including one out of five stars concerning health inspections, one out of five stars for staffing issues and two out of five stars for quality measures. The Philadelphia County neglect lawyers at Nursing Home Law Center have found various deficiencies, violations and safety concerns at Cheltenham Nursing and Rehab Center including:

  • Failure to Ensure That Every Resident Remains Free from Physical Restraints Unless Need for Medical Treatment
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated July 20, 2017, a notation was made by a state investigator concerning the facility's failure to "ensure that residents were free from physical restraints.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved one resident at the facility. The investigator reviewed the undated facility policy titled: American Health Foundation Restraint Management Program that read in part:

    “Physical restraints are any manual method, or physical or mechanical device, material or equipment attached or adjacent to the resident’s body that the individual cannot remove easily, which restricts freedom of movement or normal access to the one’s body.”
    “Arm restraints under the definition of physical restraints, and defined potential restraint alternatives including, but not limited to, additional supervision.”
    “When staff applies restraint to a resident, it is recommended to document previously attempted interventions in the medical record.”

    The investigator reviewed the resident’s Clinical Record, and the Nursing Progress Notes that revealed that the “staff had been applying [mitten restraints] to both of the resident’s hands, per physician’s orders.” Additional nursing progress notes revealed the resident’s medical condition and stated that the staff “suctioned the resident’s trach, that medications were administered through a PEG tube (feeding tube) the resident’s suprapubic catheter was draining urine, and that the resident’s mitten gloves were removed to assess skin then reapplied.”

    Subsequent nursing progress notes “revealed no documentation regarding specifically what the resident was doing (what, if any behaviors other than the resident’s norm) to warrant the staff’s application of risk restraints.” The investigator also noted that there was “no documentation of what alternative measures were attempted [before] implementation of the soft wrist restraints.”

    The investigators further reviewed the nursing progress notes that revealed that the resident was observed “to be a little drowsy and that the soft wrist restraints were still in place.” The resident’s “physician discontinued the use of bilateral soft wrist restraints and to reinitiate bilateral mitten gloves.” However, the clinical record did not reveal any “documentation to support the application of bilateral soft wrist physical restraints to the resident” between a specific time frame.

    The clinical record contained “no documentation that [the resident] had exhibited any unusual behaviors outside the resident’s norm where the bilateral wrist restraints were applied.” Additionally, “there is no indication that the resident’s behaviors had escalated or, that by their nature, posed a threat to his overall health and well-being. There was no documentation that the staff had attempted any non-physical restraint interventions [before] the application of the resident’s bilateral wrist restraints.” During an interview with the facility Director of Nurses, these problems were confirmed.

  • Failure to Report and Investigate Any Acts or Reports of Abuse, Neglect or Mistreatment of Residents
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated July 20, 2017, a state surveyor documented the facility’s failure to “ensure that one resident’s allegation of abuse/neglect was thoroughly investigated.” The state investigator reviewed the facility’s policy and procedure titled: Abuse Prevention and Reporting from 2006 that revealed in part:

    “In response to allegations of abuse, neglect, exploitation or mistreatment, the facility will ensure alleged violations involving abuse, neglect, exploitation or mistreatment, including injuries of unknown source or misappropriation of resident property are reported immediately, but no later than two hours after the allegation has been made.”

    This response includes “if the events that caused the allegation involving abuse result in bodily injury or not later than 24 hours if the events that caused the allegation do not involve abuse and do not result in serious bodily injury.” The staff is to report the incident “to the Administrator or the facility and to other officials including the State Survey Agency and Adult Protective Services where state law provides for jurisdiction over long-term care facilities.”

    “Failed to ensure that one resident’s allegation of abuse/neglect was thoroughly investigated.” – PA State Inspector

    The incident in question involved a cognitively intact resident who “requires the assistance of one-person, physical assist.” The investigator reviewed the resident’s clinical record that revealed the resident reported “to her family that she was not changed all day.” The investigator interviewed the Assistant Director of Nurses who “confirmed there was no investigation regarding the resident’s allegation and stated, ‘I cannot give you what I do not have.’” The investigator documented that the facility had “failed to ensure that one resident’s allegation of abuse/neglect was thoroughly investigated.”

  • Failure to Ensure Every Resident is Provided an Environment Free of Accident Hazards That Led to the Resident’s Death
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated March 8, 2017, the state agency surveyor noted the nursing home’s failure to “maintain a safe and hazard-free environment related to oxygen and medication storage.” The deficient practice by the nursing staff involved one resident. The Nursing Home also failed to ensure the resident “received adequate supervision related to the previous removal of a tracheostomy which caused actual harm to the resident when the tracheostomy was removed for the second time and resulted in the resident’s death.”

    The state investigator reviewed the resident’s clinical record to show that “after spending three months in an acute care hospital and an acute care rehabilitation center, following a massive subarachnoid bleed [between the brain and tissue)” the resident entered this nursing facility. Upon admission, the resident “was non-verbal but could communicate by nodding her head yes or no.” The resident had undergone a ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgical procedure that collects excess cerebrospinal fluid in the brain’s ventricles. The resident required a ventilator to support her breathing and used a PEG tube that passed into their stomach through the abdominal wall as a way of taking and food.

    A review of the resident’s Progress Notes revealed that one evening just before midnight, “the Charge Nurse responded to a call by a nurse assistant. The resident was noted to be in bed with her trach completely out, staff immediately had to hyperextend (extend the neck beyond its normal limits to open the resident’s airway) the resident’s neck and reinserted the trach back into place. A small [amount] of blood was noted around the insertion site. The resident was noted to be in respiratory distress. The physician was made aware, and an order was given to send the resident to the emergency department for further evaluation.”

    The investigator interviewed the Director of Nurses who “confirmed that the only new interventions added to the resident’s Plan of Care upon her return from the emergency department were close supervision, hand mittens to prevent the resident from pulling the trach out. The physician ordered trazodone [an antidepressant] to be given during hours of sleep.”

    Subsequent Progress Notes revealed that the resident “continues with periodic episodes of agitation and has made several attempts to take the trach out.” At 6:30 PM one evening, the resident was seen receiving breathing treatment and still “had one trach in and one mitten was off, and the mitten was replaced at about 7:45 PM [when the] staff checked on the resident. The resident was not responding, and on thorough examination, the staff noted that the resident’s trach was out. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated. The resident was pronounced dead at 8:33 PM.”

    The state investigator noted that the facility “failed to implement interventions and supervision to prevent a resident from harming themselves, following the removal of the tracheostomy that caused actual harm to the resident when the tracheostomy was removed for the second time and resulted in the resident’s death.”

  • Failure to Ensure That the Nursing Home Area is Safe, Easy to Use, Clean and Comfortable for Residents, Staff, and the Public
  • In a summary statement of deficiencies dated November 16, 2016, a state surveyor documented the facility’s failure to “provide a safe, sanitary and comfortable environment for residents and staff.” The state investigator observed the second floor of the facility with a Licensed Practical Nurse where it was revealed that “two central shower areas had soiled floors and two shower drains, metal, approximately 5-6 inches in diameter, were heavily soiled with hair and gray/brown debris. In one shower area, there were two large open bins with soiled clothing with brown stains; the areas had a bad odor.”

    The investigator observed the third floor with a Licensed Practical Nurse and saw “that two central shower areas had soiled floors and two shower drains, metal, approximately 5-6 inches in diameter, were heavily soiled with hair and gray/brown debris: the area had a bad odor.” The same findings were made on the first floor in the central shower area. A review was conducted on the Monthly Resident Council Meeting minutes where “residents gathered to discuss issues affecting their lives. The document “revealed the bathrooms and shower rooms were not cleaned and had urine odors.”

Were You Injured at Cheltenham Nursing And Rehabilitation Center?

If you believe that your grandparent, parent or spouse died prematurely or suffered serious injury while a resident at Cheltenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, contact Pennsylvania nursing home abuse lawyers at Nursing Home Law Center at (800) 926-7565 today. Our law firm fights aggressively on behalf of Philadelphia County victims of mistreatment living in long-term facilities including nursing homes in Philadelphia. Our nursing home attorneys have successfully resolved many financial compensation claims for victims of mistreatment in nursing homes. Contact us now to schedule a free case review to discuss how to obtain justice and resolve a financial compensation claim. Let us fight aggressively on your behalf to ensure your rights are protected.

We accept every case concerning wrongful death, nursing home abuse, and personal injury through contingency fee arrangements. This agreement will postpone payment of our legal services until after our lawyers have resolved your case through a negotiated settlement or jury trial award. Our law firm offers every client a “No Win/No-Fee” Guarantee, meaning you will owe us nothing if we are unable to obtain compensation to recover your family’s damages. Let our team begin working on your case today to ensure you receive adequate compensation. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential.

Sources:

Client Reviews
★★★★★
Jonathan did a great job helping my family navigate through a lengthy lawsuit involving my grandmother's death in a nursing home. Through every step of the case, Jonathan kept my family informed of the progression of the case. Although our case eventually settled at a mediation, I really was impressed at how well prepared Jonathan was to take the case to trial. Lisa
★★★★★
After I read Jonathan’s Nursing Home Blog, I decided to hire him to look into my wife’s treatment at a local nursing home. Jonathan did a great job explaining the process and the laws that apply to nursing homes. I immediately felt at ease and was glad to have him on my side. Though the lawsuit process was at times frustrating, Jonathan reassured me, particularly at my deposition. I really felt like Jonathan cared about my wife’s best interests, and I think that came across to the lawyers for the nursing home. Eric