Champaign Nursing Home Abuse & Bedsore

Champaign Nursing Home & Pressure Sore Attorneys

In many cases, the only conclusion families can make in providing ongoing care to a loved one is to move their parent, grandparent or spouse into a nursing facility. This decision is usually accompanied by anxiety and fear for their continued well-being. These fears are not unwarranted, as the high incident rates of life-threatening nursing facility-acquired bedsores have reached epidemic proportions. In fact, the Champaign nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC have handled many cases where senior citizens suffer preventable bedsores due to the negligence of the nursing staff.

Even though the Nursing Home Reform Act of 1987 was enacted in an effort to establish standards of reform on the procedures, practices and protocols used in nursing facilities, many residents are still the victim of nursing home neglect. Nearly every bedsore (decubitus ulcer; pressure ulcers; pressure sore) is preventable if the nursing staff ensures that the resident is turned or repositioned every couple of hours to avoid constricting blood flow to the skin caused by immobility and pressure on bony areas of the body. Unfortunately, insufficient supervision or lack of proper training and an understaffed environment can be detrimental to the health and well-being of residents.

Nearly 85,000 residents live within the Champaign city limits, of which approximately 10,000 are senior citizens. This number more than doubles when accounting for all of the elderly living throughout Champaign County. As members of the baby boomer generation continue to grow older, the increased number of elderly in the population has placed a substantial burden on nursing facilities that lack adequate staffing to ensure the health and hygiene needs of every resident is met.

Champaign Nursing Home Resident Bedsore Concerns

When a family places a loved one in a nursing facility, they are required to sign a contract agreeing to transfer the responsibility for providing care of their loved one over to the home. Any development of a facility acquired bedsore might be an indicator of neglect or mistreatment by the nursing staff and provide ample grounds for the family to bring a lawsuit or file a claim for breach of contract, statutory violation or negligence.

Our Illinois elder abuse attorneys recognize that every resident in a nursing environment has the right to be free of neglect, mistreatment or abuse. To assist families, nursing home attorneys continuously review, assess and evaluate health concerns, safety violations, filed complaints and opened investigations against nursing facilities all throughout Illinois. We gather this information from numerous national databases including the federal website Medicare.gov.

Comparing Champaign Area Nursing Facilities

Our Illinois bedsore attorneys have compiled and posted the list below of Champaign area nursing facilities currently maintaining below average ratings compared other nursing homes nationwide. In addition, we have added primary concerns about specific cases in detail particulars in each case that might be seen as negligence or mistreatment. Many families use this information to determine the best location to a place a loved one who requires the highest level of hygiene and health care.

Piatt County Nursing Home

1111 N State St
Monticello, Illinois 61856
(217) 762-2506
A “For-Profit” 100-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars
2 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores or Heal Existing Pressure Sores

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/02/2015, a notation was made during an annual licensure and certification survey by a state investigator concerning the facility’s failure to “provide necessary interventions to prevent skin breakdown for [one resident at the facility] review for pressure sore risks.”

The deficient practice was noted by state investigator after an interview with a facility Licensed Practical Nurse at 10:45 AM on 04/01/2015 who stated that the Wound Nurse for the facility “was not notified of the ER room reporting on 03/07/2015 that [a resident] had a Stage I or Stage II pressure sore to the right gluteal fold.”

The Wound Nurse stated that the Wound Nurse is responsible for tracking “all pressure and non-pressure related skin conditions on the Weekly Skin Report Sheet […and] that the floor nurses are responsible for daily monitoring of the [resident’s] skin condition.” The Wound Nurse noted that they “had not assessed or measured the right gluteal fold until this morning [04/01/2015].”

The Wound Nurse also stated that the resident “had a pressure sore caused by the straps on the mechanical lift slings previously and that in November 2014 a [different] sling was ordered for [the resident].” The Wound Nurse then remarked, “that on 11/17/2014, an in-service was conducted to train the CNA’s regarding [the resident’s] transfer status and use of mechanical slings.”

The Wound Nurse also indicated that the resident’s “antifungal treatment to perineal and buttock area is a preventative measure to prevent [the resident’s] skin from breaking down […and] confirmed that there is missing documentation and [missing] circled initials on the treatment sheet […and] that the missing documentation and [lack of] circled initials means that the treatment was not administered as ordered.”

The state investigator noted that throughout the entire month of March, the Nurse’s Notes did “not document an assessment or description of the resident’ skin condition related to [the resident’s] excoriation to her right gluteal fold.” In addition, the entire month of March Treatment Sheet documents a treatment to apply antifungal cream to the perineal area, buttocks every shift as [a preventative measure]” that for the most part was not done according to orders.

Our Monticello nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow procedures and protocols when providing treatment to a resident with existing bedsores could cause additional harm and allow the bedsores to degrade. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Piatt County Nursing Home might be considered negligence or mistreatment because the facility failed to follow established procedures and protocols to provide a standard of care at a level enforced by federal and state nursing home regulators.

Heartland of Paxton

1001 East Pells Street
Paxton, Illinois 60957
(217) 379-4361
A “For-Profit” 106-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 2 out of 5 possible stars
2 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols for Treating Pressure Ulcers that Resulted in a Degrading Wound

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 04/30/2015, a complaint investigation was opened against the facility for its failure to “provide pressure ulcer treatment as ordered.” This deficient practice by the nursing staff at Heartland of Paxton affected one resident at the facility.

The complaint investigation involved a review of medical records clinical notes and observations including observation of the Assistant Director of Nursing (ADON) at 10:25 AM on 04/28/2015 who “cleansed the resident’s sacrum ulcer with [medication] and then applied the wound VAC foam to the wound base, then secured it.” The state investigator conducted an interview at 6:10 PM that same day on 04/28/2015 where it was confirmed by the Assistant Director of Nursing “that she did not apply Santyl to the wound base prior to applying the wound VAC foam.” The ADON stated, “I’ll have to check into that, I thought the Santyl had been discontinued.” However, the Assistant Director of Nursing “confirm she did not check the order prior to doing [the resident’s] treatment.”

Our Paxton nursing home neglect lawyers recognize the failing to follow protocols when providing treatment to residents suffering from pressure ulcers could cause the wound to degrade to a life-threatening condition. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Heartland of Paxton might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow established procedures and protocols on providing the minimal standards of care when treating a bedsore.

Arcola Health Care Center

422 East Fourth Street
Arcola, Illinois 61910
(217) 268-3022
A “For-Profit” 100-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 3 out of 5 possible stars
3 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Ensure Residents Receive Proper Treatment to Prevent New Bedsores or Heal Existing Pressure Sores

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 12/9/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “implement a pressure relieving intervention for [a resident at the facility] reviewed for pressure sores.”

The deficient practice was noted by the state surveyor after a review of a resident’s Minimum MDS (Minimum Data Set) that revealed that the resident “requires extensive assistance for bed mobility and transfers.” The resident’s 09/15/2015 Care Plan documents that the resident “is at risk for skin breakdown and that [the resident’s] coccyx is red. The Care Plan documents an intervention for [the resident] to have a pressure relieving cushion in his chair.”

The state investigator noted that the resident’s 12/04/2015 Weekly Wound Tracking Sheet documents that the resident “has a Stage II pressure sore on his right great toe, which was acquired at the facility.”

Observations were made by the state investigator beginning at 9:00 AM on 12/08/2015 where the Registered Nurse was observed cleansing the resident’s “coccyx and applied barrier cream to the area. At the time the [resident’s] coccyx was red.”

At approximately 11:55 AM on the same morning, the resident “was seated in his wheelchair in the dining room and he did not have a pressure relieving cushion in his wheelchair.” Less than 20 minutes later at 12:15 PM, on 12/08/2015, a Certified Nursing Aide providing the resident care assisted the resident “to transfer into his wheelchair. At that time [the resident] did not have a pressure relieving cushion in his chair.”

A further observation was made at 3:30 PM on 12/08/2015 the noted that the resident “was seated his wheelchair at the nurse’s station and did not have a pressure relieving cushion in his wheelchair. At that time [a Certified Nursing Assistant providing the resident care] stated that [the resident] does not use a cushion in his wheelchair.”

The investigator then conducted a review of the resident’s care plan with the facility’s Director of Nurses and Minimum Data Set Care Plan Coordinator at 3:55 PM that same day on 12/08/2015. At that time, the Director of Nurses stated that the resident “should have a pressure relieving cushion in his wheelchair.”

Our Arcola nursing home neglect attorneys recognize the failing to follow procedures and protocols when providing care and treatment to residents suffering from pressure sores could provide an environment where the bedsore degrades to a life-threatening condition. The deficient practice by the nursing staff at Arcola Health Care Center might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions failed to follow established procedures and protocols enforced by state and federal nursing regulators.

Arba Care Center of Colfax

402 South Harrison
Colfax, Illinois 61728
(309) 723-2591
A “For-Profit” 60-certified bed Medicaid/Medicare-participating facility
Overall Rating – 1 out of 5 possible stars
1 Star Rating

Primary Concerns –

Failure to Follow Protocols for Treating Pressure Ulcers that Resulted in a Degrading Wound

In a summary statement of deficiencies dated 10/22/2015, a state surveyor made a notation during an annual licensure and certification survey concerning the facility’s failure to “consistently assess and document pressure ulcers, implement dietary interventions, pressure relieving methods, ensure appropriate treatment and develop of Plan of Care.” This deficient practice by the nursing staff at ARBA Care Center of Colfax directly affected to residents at the facility.

The deficient practice was noted by state surveyor who reviewed a resident’s 09/23/2015 Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk that revealed the resident had scored a 12 on the Braden Scale, “which represents a high risk for pressure sores.”

A review was also conducted on the resident’s MDS (Minimum Data Set) that revealed the resident had “a Stage II pressure ulcer and treatment of pressure reducing device for bed and pressure ulcer care. The Care Area Assessment [CAA] Worksheet for pressure ulcers and nutrition documents the pressure ulcer that triggered the Care Area Assessment will be addressed in the Care Plan.”

The state investigator noted that “there are no additional intervention or wound updates or nutritional interventions for the wound in the care plans updated 09/23/2015.” This is while the resident’s 10:00 AM 11/08/2014 Nurse’s Notes documents an “open area to the left buttock.”

The next time the resident is documented in the Nurse’s Notes occur on 12/30/2014 at 10:00 AM which documents “there are two open areas on the [resident’s] left buttock and that a new treatment [was prescribed to the resident].”

The surveyor reviewed the resident’s 12/31/2014 Order Summary Report that documents an order involving: Extra Liquid (Nutritional Supplements) give 4.5 gram by about two times a day.” However, upon review “the facility was not able to produce evidence the nutritional supplement was given to [the resident] in August 2015, September 2015 and October 2015.”

In addition, “there is no evidence that the (nutritional supplement for wound healing) was discontinued during this time.” Additionally, the resident’s 04/02/2015 Fax Cover Sheet documents that the resident “has an open area on the left and right buttock. There are no Nurse’s Notes or assessments documenting the open area.”

The state investigator reviewed the resident’s 05/24/2015 Nurse’s Notes that documents “skin area observed and a fax cover sheet [sent to the] Medical Director documenting an open area to the left inner gluteal fold. There is no documentation regarding the open wound in the Nurse’s Notes until 07/26/2015 at 10:00 PM that documents: 2.0 centimeter open area was observed on the left buttock.”

The 8:30 PM 08/30/2015 Nurse’s Notes maintain for the resident documents: Wound on resident’s bottom is resolved. Peri-wound area is reddened; however, skin is intact.” The resident’s 09/17/2015 2:00 PM Nurse’s Notes document an open area on his bottom.” Three days later, the 09/20/2015 Nurse’s Notes document that “the resident presents with a Stage II area on the left inner buttock.”

Again, on the resident’s 09/16/2015 Individual Weekly Wound Tracking Tool “documents a Stage II left buttock pressure wound with measurements of a length of one inch and width of 0.5 inch. There were no other entries on this Weekly Wound Tracking Tool when a copy was obtained” by the state investigator. In addition, “a copy of the same document provided by [the facility Registered Nurse Supervisor] documents an additional entry on the sheet dated 09/30/2015 that the wound was healed.”

An additional notation was made in the resident’s Individual Weekly Wound Tracking Tool documenting that “measurements must be done a minimum of every seven days.” In addition, the resident’s 09/21/2015 nutrition progress notes that document “Stage II open area to the left inner buttock, may benefit from adding extra one ounce of protein with breakfast for wound healing.”

The facility’s Registered Dietitian stated at 1:35 PM on 10/20/2015 that “she fills out a request for any diet interventions that need to be implemented and the facility supposed to take care of it [the dietary intervention] request and send it to the resident’s doctor for the order.” The Registered Dietitian “was asked about the recommendation for an extra one ounce of protein at breakfast [and reply], ‘they did not do that yet’?”

The state investigator noted that “there is no documentation or evidence that the Weekly Skin Assessments every Tuesday were completed for [the resident]. In addition, the resident’s “TARs (Treatment Administration Records) for the weekly skin assessment every Tuesday dated February 2015, July 2015, September 2015 are blank […and that the resident’s] October 2015 documents and assessment on 10/06/2015, but, no other evidence of skin assessments for October [were noted].”

By 09/23/2015, the resident’s Current Care Plan documents “an open area to left buttock that is pressure related with measurements of a width of 0.8 centimeters, depth of 2.0 centimeters and length of 1.0 centimeters.”

Our Colfax nursing home neglect attorneys recognized the failing to provide adequate services when caring for residents suffering from bedsores could place their health and well-being in jeopardy. The deficient practices by the nursing staff at ARBA Care Center of Colfax might be considered negligence or mistreatment because their actions fail to follow the facility’s 06/01/2015 policy title: Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers and Wounds and General Wound and Skin Care Guidelines that read in part:

“The facility will ensure that all residents at risk for pressure ulcers or wounds receive necessary treatment services to promote healing. Nurses will provide wound care as prescribed by the physician. Document in the resident’s chart and the TAR (Treatment Administration Record) that wound care was administered as prescribed.”

“Skin care guidelines should be followed for all residents. Document wound assessment, treatment performed and response to treatment on the appropriate documentation form.”

Sepsis and Osteomyelitis Regularly Encountered as Bed Sore Complications

The development of a bedsore can be a crippling condition especially if the nursing staff does not take appropriate measures to stop the sore from degrading. Without proper treatment and care, a small unassuming wound on the skin can advance to a life-threatening condition especially if sepsis (blood infection) or osteomyelitis (bone infection) is allowed to take hold.

In the early stages of a bedsore (decubitus ulcer; pressure sores; pressure ulcers), an infection in the bloodstream may respond well to treatment. Alternatively, if the nursing staff does not properly care for the open wound, and the condition is allowed to rapidly escalate, the consequences could result in serious injuries or death.

Sepsis is an infectious condition that develops when bacteria is allowed to enter the body through an open bedsore. The infection can become highly aggressive if the resident’s immune system has been diminished by age, other medical condition or lack of nutrition/hydration. At this point, it may be impossible to stop the infection from spreading throughout the entire body, leading to the resident’s death.

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone that usually develops at the later stages of a developing pressure sore. When the skin, tissue and muscle is allowed to degrade into an ulcerated wound, the resident’s bones, muscles and tendons deep inside the wound become exposed and highly susceptible to infection. Aggressive treatment using heavy antibiotics is usually required, where many residents are transferred to the hospital’s intensive care unit for further treatment.

Preventable Problems Related to Decubitus Ulcers

Nearly every developing bedsore in a nursing facility is preventable. Individuals that are most highly susceptible to developing a pressure ulcer are those who are mobility challenged and bound to a wheelchair or bedridden. Without assistance from the staff to readjust their body at least one time every two hours or more, the weight of the resident’s body against the mattress, chair or another body part could restrict blood flow, causing the deterioration of skin and tissue because of a lack of oxygen in as little as two hours.

In recent years, overcrowding, underpaid and understaffed nursing facilities has seen a significant rise in the number of cases involving facility acquired bedsores. The lack of adequate staff to monitor the resident and take appropriate measures to turn and reposition their body has caused significant problems to the health and well-being of residents. So too has the lack of training of the nursing staff to identify, detect and document newly acquired, completely treatable pressure sores. In many cases, the staff has allowed the pressure sore to develop to a stage where it is nearly impossible to reverse.

Hiring a Nursing Home Lawyer to Represent Your Family in a Champaign Bed Sore Case

If you suspect that your loved one has suffered from sepsis, osteomyelitis or another debilitating injury from an open wound bedsore, it is essential to alert the medical professionals immediately. A wound doctor can confirm a diagnosis and ensure the treatment is provided according to protocols and procedures. However, many families will hire personal injury attorney who specializes in nursing home abuse cases to handle a legal aspect of ensuring that their loved one receives the best care.

The Champaign nursing home neglect attorneys at Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC can provide you and your family various options on how to ensure that the rights of your loved one are maintained. Our team of dedicated Illinois elder abuse lawyers can speak with the nursing home Administrator, Director of Nursing and law enforcement to determine if negligence or mistreatment was directly involved in the injury suffered by your loved one.

We urge you to call our Champaign County elder abuse law office at (888) 424-5757 today. Schedule your appointment to meet with one of our reputable attorneys for your free, no-obligation case review. All information you share with our law offices will remain confidential. We accept all personal injury cases, wrongful death lawsuits and nursing home abuse claims through contingency fee agreements. This means you and your family receive immediate legal representation without payment of an upfront fee.

Should you have questions about Illinois law related to pressure sores, view our page here.

For information on bed sores and nursing home negligence in other Illinois cities, please review the pages below:

  • Aurora Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Bloomington Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Cicero Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Chicago Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Joliet Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Moline Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Naperville Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Orland Park Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Peoria Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Rockford Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Schaumburg Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Springfield Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Urbana Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys
  • Waukegan Nursing Home & Bed Sore Attorneys